Tell us your experience after the 1st Healing Experiment

DID YOUR LIFE GET HEALED?

If you were part of the Healing Intention Experiment, please take just a few minutes to tell me how the experiment went for you and if your life has changed in any way – for better or worse: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/SJ852PN

 

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Next Intention Experiment

 

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Lynne McTaggart and Quantum University want to give you another chance to experience the power of group thoughts and learn the results of the first Intention Experiment to be broadcast live on QuantumWorld.TV on May 24th, 2014.

http://quantumworld.tv/second-intention-experiment/ 

The Fairness Campaign

I have just returned after two and a half weeks on the road around Pennsylvania and the Pacific northwest, spreading the message of The Bond about survival of the fairest – our need to care, share and be fair. 

It was my first trip back to my home country since January, and what smacked me right between the eyes about the current state of my home country was the unfairness I saw, everywhere I looked.  Everything about the current American experience these days appears to be manifestly, grossly unfair. (more…)

The Declaration of Cooperation

I’m thrilled to announce that the American version of my very latest book The Bond is now available on Amazon and other online stores: www.thebond.info.

Last week I promised to tell you more about my vision for a new way forward and the thinking behind The Bond.

I explained that, like you, while observing the crises around us – in the economy, in the unemployment figures, with all the devastation in our environment, with gas and oil and food prices skyrocketing and the US government in unprecedented stalemate — I spent three years saying to myself there has got to be a better way. 
 
There must be a better way to live, to work — even to learn. (more…)

The Bond Tour: A New Vision, a New Way Forward

There's only two weeks to go before the release of my new book THE BOND : CONNECTING THROUGH THE SPACE BETWEEN US, and I wanted to tell you a little more about the work that I have been doing for three years.  The book was written in response to all the crises we now face, including the financial recession, which I believe have occurred because the livese we´ve chosen to lead are not consistent with our truest nature as givers and sharers.
(more…)

Love hurts, love wounds

A study caught my eye this week that underscores the powerful connection between us.  It concerned the emotional pain of rejection, and social psychologists from the University of Michigan made an extraordinary discovery:  the pain of rejection is not simply an emotional pain, but an actual physical hurt. (more…)

Survival of the fairest

As most of you know, for two years, I have been holed away, writing a new book, The Bond. Now that it’s done, I want to tell you a little about this project and why I wrote this book.  

All of us now sense that we have reached the end of something. Since the millennium, commentators of every variety have been trying to get a handle on the collective significance of the continuous crises besetting us in modern times: banking crises, terrorist crises, sovereign-debt crises, climate-change crises, energy crises, food crises, ecological crises, manmade and otherwise. (more…)

The Heart of Darkness

At the moment, I am reading a new book by Robert Jahn and Brenda Dunne, formerly directors of the former Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR).  Consciousness and the Source of Reality (www.icrl.org) is the extraordinary story of their three-decade journey into the heart of consciousness.  (more…)

Just like us

All of us in the West took a ring-side seat to watch in jubilation as Tunisia and Egyptian protesters recently managed the unthinkable: the non-violent overthrow of their countries’ repressive, corrupt political regimes.
As other countries in the Middle East — Libya, Bahrain, Yemen, Morocco, Jordan — follow suit, we cheer them on with the tacit thought that it’s about time they all embraced our political and economic values, became open and fair democracies – became, in effect, just like us. (more…)

Belief: It’s in our Bones

Several weeks ago I came across a study that confirms everything that I believe about the very human need for the transcendent. 

Michael Blume, a social science researcher at Jena University in Germany, decided to see if it was true that religions are ‘like viruses of the mind,’ as Richard Dawkins maintained, costing those so ‘infected’ in time, money but most especially health.  (more…)

The wave of love – causes a jolt

Russian physicist Dr. Konstantin Korotkov has sent us back results of our December 11 Intention Experiment, which, as always, are very interesting.

Dr. Konstantin Korotkov

For those of you who have just come on board, Korotkov, a professor at St. Petersburg Technical University, invented the Elecrophotonic Imaging (EPI)/Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer. Korotkov’s equipment blends several techniques: photography, measurements of light intensity and computerized pattern recognition.

This equipment aims to measure the subtle light emissions that emanate from all living things. Korotkov’s equipment stirs up individual photons by ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal.

These light emissions offer valuable information about the state of health of the organism in question; the subtlest of changes show up as a change in light.

The GDV is now widely used in Russia as a diagnostic tool for many illnesses and also for materials testing – particularly of liquids —because it can detect the subtlest of changes in freshness or stability.

(more…)

A book without an ending

The Intention Experiment, voted a top Amazon 100 by readers and now a worldwide sensation, is the first book to provide all the scientific evidence about human intention.

It is also the first book to invite you, the reader, to take an active part in its original research.

(more…)

The Field

Lauded around the world, from scientists and non-scientists alike, as the first book to synthesize discoveries from quantum physicists about the nature of consciousness into a unified theory.

The number-one read for anyone interested in paradigm shift, nature of consciousness, the ‘paranormal’ or noetic science. (more…)

Expanded Audio Book Editions

Living the Field: Tapping into the Secret Force of the Universe - Winner of the "2008 Nautilus Award" for World Changing Audio Books!!!

Living with Intention: Intention is a skill we can all use, but scientifically-based training for this faculty remains scarce. (more…)

Failing children

I’ve just returned from a Transformational Leadership Council conference in New Orleans.  Although I had a wonderful time and celebrated my birthday surrounded by friends and the Big Easy’s Dixieland music, I have to say that I was shocked by what I saw and read while I was there. 

During our visit, we drove around some of the areas that had been hit by Hurricane Katrina.  Naturally, I was disturbed by the devastation still apparent in some quarters, which the richest country in the world had not rebuilt more than five years after the disaster. Nevertheless, that was not the main source of my alarm. What shocked me most was the nature of my country’s statistics these days. (more…)

Healing thoughts

The biggest headache for any drug-company executive is the placebo. A placebo, or sugar pill, is used in controlled drug trials precisely to show that the drug in question works.

One of two groups of patients is given the active drug, while the other group is given the placebo, but neither knows who got what.  The assumption is that far more patients will show improvements on the drug than on the placebo.  Upon this assumption is built the entire edifice of modern medicine.

Nevertheless, in practice, so many patients receive the same relief and even the same side effects with a placebo as with the drug itself that a placebo often is not a true control. (more…)

Hug a Republican (or Democrat) Today

All of us were left traumatized by the rampage shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Gifford last Saturday, which left 13 others in the line of fire injured and six dead, including a 9 year old born on September 11, 2001.

Although President Barack Obama was credited with a moving bi-partisan speech at the Arizona memorial last week, the political repercussions of the event continue, with Democrats blaming Republicans for inflammatory language and Republicans blaming Democrats for exploiting the situation to leverage their own sagging political fortunes. 

Nevertheless, to lay the cause of the tragedy at the door of any single partisan cause — whether Sarah Palin, lax gun laws or too liberal democratic legislation — is entirely to miss the point. (more…)

The wave of love - causes a jolt

Russian physicist Dr. Konstantin Korotkov has sent us back results of our December 11 Intention Experiment, which, as always, are very interesting.

For those of you who have just come on board, Korotkov, a professor at St. Petersburg Technical University, invented the Elecrophotonic Imaging (EPI)/Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer. Korotkov’s equipment blends several techniques: photography, measurements of light intensity and computerized pattern recognition.

This equipment aims to measure the subtle light emissions that emanate from all living things. Korotkov’s equipment stirs up individual photons by ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal. (more…)

The secret Santa who pays it forward

Marie, an employee of a software company, had an epiphany one day at her company’s vending machine.  She decided that every time she came for her afternoon Coke, she’d leave money in the machine for the next person, with a note and a card: Your can of Coke has been paid for.  Take this Smile card and pay it forward.

From the moment Marie began her campaign, frantic emails began circulating around the office in an attempt to pinpoint the identity of the company’s secret Santa. A Neighborhood Watch scheme was set up with two or three employees on constant lookout.  At this point, Marie decided that it was time to escalate operations.  She moved to another floor, where she surreptitiously left a daily supply of donuts. For months everyone was talking about it.  It completely changed the conversation. More important, though, it entirely changed the atmosphere of her office.

“When generosity is the basic social capital, you see things from a broader perspective,” says Nipun Mehta, who runs CharityFocus and distributes Smile cards. “You come from a different place of openness. You’re more likely to see multiple views. It deepens trust. The cup of gratitude overflows, and turns into action in so many ways.” (more…)

A prescription for old age

Aside from rushing around to ready ourselves for the festivities, this time of time of year gives most of us pause.  It’s a time for good cheer, but also for assessing our lives.

Most of us in the West assume that if we’re lucky enough to exceed our threescore and ten – the Biblical estimate of our lifespan — we do so at the expense of our bodies.  We’ve come to expect that the long path to our death is accompanied by an inevitable decline in our physical health. And, of all the things we fear, perhaps the most terrifying is the prospect of decay.  We live with the certainty that we will grow progressively more feeble, forgetful and immobile.

The latest evidence would suggest that this perception of old age has largely resulted from the interfering hands of modern medicine.  (more…)

The cancer in your soul

As I prepare for our special cancer teleconference with the pioneering Dr Patrick Kingsley this Sunday, I’ve been looking over the many things I have written about the disease. 

I have largely characterized it as a deficiency disease — a slow-motion starving of vital nutrients resulting from the wholesale industrialization of food —or disease of toxicity — a poisoning from our chronic exposure to some 20,000 chemicals present in our air, food, water and homes.

Clearly, these elements play an important supporting role. But perhaps not the leading one. (more…)

The love wave

Several weeks ago, in Riccione in Italy, when I was a speaker at the Reconnection Mastery Conference, I heard about new equipment devised by Russian physicist Konstantin Korotkov.

As you may remember, Korotkov, a professor at St. Petersburg Technical University, invented the Elecrophotonic Imaging (EPI)/ Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer.

Ordinarily, as we know from the work of Fritz Albert Popp, living things send out a tiny current of photons, perceptible only to the most sensitive equipment in conditions of utter pitch black.

As Korotkov realized, a better way to capture this light was to stir up photons by ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal. (more…)

Our starry, starry days

Last week, an article in the British papers concerned the fact that medical scientists, usually so dismissive of anything smacking of astrology, were studying the work of a British astrologer named Nicola Smuts. 

Smuts makes the extraordinary claim that she can help those women with fertility problems to conceive – even if they’ve failed at IVF – by divining special astrological times when women are most likely to get pregnant.

Smuts, who is the granddaughter of Jan Smuts, the former South African prime minister, has a string of successes, even among clients who were initially skeptical.  For instance, Mandy Parry, a teacher from Bristol, had undergone seven failed attempts at infertility treatment and was 46 besides – when fertility has largely waned.

During a consultation in June, Smuts told Parry that the next good time for her to conceive was just six weeks away in August. 

Although Parry didn’t believe her, she followed her advice anyway, as she was trying anything at that point.  She was stunned to find that, as Smuts had predicted, the IVF treatment worked that time, and Parry gave birth to her daughter Violet in last May. (more…)

All die of heartbreak

Nearly a year ago, Hollywood was shocked when actress Brittany Murphy, just 32, died from pneumonia, which she contracted after taking over-the-counter drugs.  Within five months, her doting husband, British screenwriter Simon Monjack, aged 40, was also dead.  He’d died from a cardiac arrest – his heart had literally broken.

I bring this up because I just came across some fascinating data that confirms what I’ve always suspected: there is such a thing as a broken heart. (more…)

The roar of the crowd

Recently I read two items about the power of groups.  The first concerned a new book, Talking to the Enemy,  written by an anthropologist named Scott Atran, who has traveled around the world making a detailed study of terrorists and all violent extremists, including suicide bombers, by asking one simple question:  Why do they do it?

The answer is not, as we believe in the West, religion.

As Atran puts it:  “People don’t simply kill and die for a cause.  They kill and die for each other.” (more…)

On Forgiveness

Several weeks ago I had the privilege of speaking with my good friend James O’Dea.  As co-director of the Social Healing Project and former director of the Washington, D. C. office of Amnesty International, James has spent many years smoothing the way for warring sides to reconcile and forgive. 

For 10 years he has co-hosted “compassion and social healing” dialogues with Dr. Judith Thompson, in which members of very divided social and political groups — Republican and loyalist Northern Irish, Turkish and Greek Cypriots, Israelis and Palestinians — meet in an attempt to heal from their shared experience. 

I thought forgiveness an appropriate meditation for all of us, in the wake of the very fraught and polarized American mid-term election.

In the social-healing dialogues, O’Dea and Thompson move the emphasis away from who is right and who is wrong, and toward who is wounded and how to heal.  And in most cases, they discover that both victim and perpetrator are wounded. (more…)

Gene genie

Lately, I’ve been asking myself a few pretty basic questions:  What on earth is a gene? And, an even bigger question: What on earth is evolution?

In 1953, molecular biologists James Watson and Charles Crick claimed to have unlocked the “secret of life” by unraveling deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the genetic coding in the nucleus of every cell. Thereafter, scientists came to believe that within the coiled double helix lay every individual’s lifelong blueprint. (more…)

In all our dreams

Recently, an amazing statistic emerged from a little known sleep laboratory at the University of Swansea in Great Britain:  namely, that the number of people in Western society experiencing a lucid dream has increased by up to 40 per cent in the last 30 years. 

In fact, current estimates are that most of us — eight of every 10 people — will experience a lucid dream at some point in our lives.

In a lucid dream you are, in a sense awake; you remain aware that you are dreaming and so can consciously manipulate the dream’s events.  This neat ability was recently highlighted in the movie Inception, where Leonardo DiCaprio and Ellen Page are able to custom-design their dreams in order to blow up cafes, curve streets into the heavens and in general bend reality to their will.

This ability used to be relatively rare — a mark of the gifted psychic or sensitive.  But according to Professor Mark Blagrove, one of Britain’s leading authorities on dreams, our dreaming patterns are drastically shifting. These days far more of us are able to delve into our dreams and consciously control them.  (more…)

Dirty medicine

After 21 years of reporting on the excesses and dangers of modern medicine for my newsletter What Doctors Don't Tell You, I have become a bit ho-hum when confronted by yet another new revelation about the practices of drug companies.

But I have to tell you that I have been shaken to the core by new evidence that a good percentage of the medical research published in the world’s top medical literature is ghostwritten.

In the pharmaceutical world, ‘ghostwriting’ has a particular meaning.  A drugs company will hire a PR firm — known in pharma-speak as a ‘medical education and communication company  (MECC)’ –  to prepare clinical trials, engage a ghost to write an article with a positive spin on the results, and then enlist a prominent academic to put his name to a paper he’s had nothing to do with in order to give it a patina of respectability.

This ‘study’ will then be submitted (and usually published) in a respectable medical journal. (more…)

More than our fair share

Last week, at his party’s annual conference, British prime minister David Cameron made as the subject of his speech a return to ‘fairness’ in society when announcing some painful fall-out as a result of the new government’s drive to reduce the country’s enormous budget deficit.  Child benefits for the better off were to be axed, and welfare benefits were to be curbed for those fit to work.  Since that time, commentators have been busy attempting to define what exactly is fair.

 “Fairness is about reciprocity and contribution,” wrote a blog by the Fabian Society last Wednesday.  “The ’something for something’ conception of fairness, which the government seeks to appeal to with its welfare reforms, also includes the idea that those who do put in to the common pot should get something back”. (more…)

All our family

Last weekend my family and I saw an incredible staging of Arthur Miller’s play All My Sons at the Apollo theater in London. I’d seen the play before, but Miller’s themes especially resonated with me this time because they offer such a vital message in these uncertain times.
 
If you haven’t seen it, here are the basics of the plot:  Joe Keller owns a company that manufactures airplane parts, which was under contract to the Army Air Force during World War II.  The play takes place three years after the war is over. One son has returned home after being in command of a company that was mainly killed. The other, a pilot in the war, is still missing. (more…)

Against Darwin, against debate

Last week, I was making the point to a friend of mine that Darwin has been used as the unwitting intellectual rationale for many social movements that haven’t been particularly good for humanity (such as red-in-tooth-in-claw capitalism), and also that Darwin, for all his brilliance as a scientist, was a white supremacist.

My friend worried that by making this explicit, I might be laying myself open to being labeled a radical Creationist. (more…)

Bullyboy science

No matter what else I write about, inside this breast will always beat the heart of a reporter. I grew up during the Woodward-Bernstein years, when journalists considered themselves members of the Fourth Estate and took seriously their role as guardian of the public interest.

For each of the first three of the six books I’ve written (including the book What Doctors Don’t Tell You), I spent months inside lawyer’s offices, laying before them shopping bags and cartons full of documents, articles and tape recordings to prove my various cases.

This early exposure — to the press’s power to bring down a corrupt presidency, and to the importance of being sure of my facts — developed in me a reasonable sense of fair play, to stick only to the evidence I had and to make sure that evidence was exhaustive. (more…)

What does conscious evolution look like?

Now that I’ve returned from my Evolutionary Leaders’ retreat, I thought I’d share with you some of my observations about what happened there. 

The Evolutionary Leaders’ is a collection of leaders in the consciousness movement, set up in 2008 by Deepak Chopra and the Association of Global New Thought.  It was Barbara Fields, the director of AGNT, and Diane Williams, of Source of Synergy Foundation whose long-term dreams — to create a ‘super group’ of thought leaders who would work together to catalyze ‘conscious evolution’ — inspired our first meeting in July 2008.  (more…)

Intention of the Week

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Intention of the Week - Kate Mcclelland

Help to heal her hepatitis C.

Kate Mcclelland

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Kate Mcclelland has hepatitis C, which has gone untreated because she writes that she just can not find a doctor to treat her.

Consequently, it has harmed her liver; she was recently told she has grade 3 cirrhosis with bridging fibrosis.

“I have studied metaphysics,” she writes. “I have read the Intention Experiment, Ernest Holmes’ The Science of Mind, and tried meditation. However, I have been unsuccessful in my efforts. All areas of my life are in need of repair. I have been unable to connect with people within my community, predominantly Irish Catholics, and actually feel in exile here.”

Please come onto the website on Wednesday, September 8, 2010 at 1 pm Eastern DST and send the following intention:

"My intention is that Kate Mcclelland be healed of hepatitis C, her liver return to full health and that she find her own community."

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Why thinking is doing something

I am just returning home from a four-day retreat with the Evolutionary Leaders, a “supergroup” of leaders within the New Thought movement begun by Deepak Chopra and the Association for Global New Thought. Joining me was Marianne Williamson, Jack Canfield, Jean Houston, Barbara Marx Hubbard, Andrew Cohen, Gregg Braden, Bruce Lipton, Lynne Twist and 40 other luminaries.

As part of this group, in late July I led a group intention to heal the Gulf oil spill, both as part of the ELs and also on my Intention Experiment site.  I suggested that participants send an intention to assist the technicians at BP in their efforts to cap the oil leak and that, no matter how one felt personally about the BP, it was important to send positive intentions to assist their efforts as the solution to the Deepwater Horizons spill lay in their hands. (more…)

Intention of the Week

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Intention of the Week - Fendi ten Hoeve

Help to heal her bladder cancer.

Fendi ten Hoeve

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Fendi ten Hoeve, aged 51, who lives in Nederhorst den Berg. a small village near Amsterdam in the Netherlands, was diagnosed with bladder cancer last March. Although some of the tumor was removed through surgery, the doctors could not remove all the cancer without risk of puncturing the bladder. The doctors have advised her to remove her bladder, lymph nodes, ovaries and womb, but she is seeking a second opinion. She is using a variety of alternative therapies: orthomolecular supplements, meditation, rest, special diet, and, she says, ‘allowing more love in my life’.

‘I truly believe in the power of the intention and the power of the numbers. Accumulated energy from as many people as possible is something I strongly believe in. Once I visited the Wailing Wall in Jerusalem, and although I am not a religious person, I had a truly spritual experience there. The energy of all these people — Jerusalem, Jews, Christians and Muslims — praying in that area was amazing and touched me and made me cry and feel peaceful for the rest of the day.’

On Sunday, August 29, 2010 at 6 pm Eastern DST, please send the following intention to Fendi:

"My intention is for Fendi ten Hoeve to be free of all bladder cancer, and to be healthy and well in every way."

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Bringing intention to work

I’ve just returned from our summer vacation, and among my books for holiday reading was Ernest Hemingway’s short works.  His tale The Old Man and the Sea tells the story of an impoverished old fisherman named Santiago, who hasn’t caught a fish for many weeks. One morning, he decides to head out further than he has ever been before and, after a Herculean struggle, he hauls in an 18-foot marlin, the largest fish ever caught in those parts, and lashes the carcass to his small skiff. But on the perilous route back, a number of sharks eat away at the fish so that, by the time he reaches the shore, only a skeleton remains.  (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Alessandra Di Noto

Help to heal her sciatic pain.

Alessandra Di Noto

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My name is Alessandra, I live in Canada.

I'm suffering so much back pain since october 2008 with both irritated sciatic nerves in my legs. I have crises going up and down. I wonder if I never will came out of this. I do not have any kind of life, laying down on my bed all the day.

Nothing help and doctors let me down with my crisis of pain. I ask for me and all the other people who are living with chronic pain and doesn't find help anywhere.

On Sunday, August 15, 2010 at 1:10 pm Eastern DST, please send the following intention to Alessandra:

"My intention is for Alessandra to completely heal from her sciatic pain and become healthy and active in every way."

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Against holism

Just occasionally, I come across a medical hero, a doctor willing to break the conspiracy of silence that exists among doctors about the damage caused by their tools.

My hero of the hour is an American psychiatrist called Grace E. Jackson.  Dr. Jackson is utterly, refreshingly horrified by psychiatric medicine. In fact, she is horrified by most forms of pharmaceutical medicine, period.  She spends her life lecturing and writing about the dangers of drugs and their ability to cause mental illness.  (more…)

Not my problem

In 2002 my magazine What Doctors Don’t Tell You first learned about plans within the European Union to radically restrict natural medicine across all member countries, starting with laws that would create a very low ceiling of ‘safe upper limits’ in vitamins.

Although the laws were ostensibly to create a level playing field within the European supplement market, the proposals bore the heavy hand of Big Pharma. (more…)

Whorls on fire

Here in the UK, we’re preparing for what scientists are calling a ‘solar tsunami’.  All predictions are on that we will have a rare glimpse of Northern lights  — a vivid neon glow of solar activity if the grey cloud perpetually engulfing England lifts tonight.

In many locations around the world, the inhabitants are regularly entertained by earthlights—strange, recurring balls of light in the sky. Even more strangely, when earthlights appear, UFO sightings, religious visions and all manner of anomalous visions are also reported. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Victor Ghattas

Help to heal his pancreatic cancer

Victor Ghattas

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Victor Ghattas lives in New Milford, New Jersey, USA. He is aged 69, but turns 70 in August. He had around 60 percent of his stomach removed many years ago, and doctors inserted mesh in a reconstructive surgical procedure. He has also had three stents in his heart.

Last May, he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Most of his pancreas has been affected by the cancer, and tumors have also been detected in the artery between the liver and pancreas. The tumor has blocked the artery, and surgeons were unable to fit a stent.

The cancer was discovered when he had a major operation. The large incision from the surgery is still not healing properly, and has become infected.

On Sunday, August 1, 2010 at 1:10 pm Eastern DST (right after our Gulf Oil intention), please send the following intention to Victor:

"My intention is for Victor Ghattas to be completely free of all cancer in his pancreas and elsewhere in his body and to be healthy and well in every way."

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First sight: back to the future

I’m back home from my Transformational Leadership Council meeting in Santa Fe, New Mexico.  During the week-long event, and the various meetings with remarkable men – and women – one particular connection stood out: a dinner my husband and I had with Larry Dossey, during which we’d had a fascinating chat about the power of premonitions. 

Larry Dossey is a doctor and former chief of staff of a Dallas, Texas hospital, who gave up his practice to write heretical books on the role of the mind, prayer and the sacred in health care. (more…)

Transcending the self

When astronaut Edgar Mitchell was returning from his flight to the moon, he had an epiphany that would change his life. Staring out the window of the Kittyhawk, he experienced a feeling of connectedness, as if all the planets and all the people of all time were attached by some invisible web. It was an overwhelmingly visceral feeling, as if he was physically extending out to the furthest reaches of the cosmos. In a single instant, he had discovered and felt The Field. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Anders Nielsen

Help to heal his esophageal cancer

Anders Nielsen

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Anders Nielson, who is 43 and lives in London, was diagnosed with cancer of the esophagus a year ago, when doctors found a 10 cm tumor there and enlarged lymph nodes in the stomach. He commenced a nine-week course of conventional chemotherapy treatment in August 2009.

This was to be followed by 'pioneering' surgery to remove and resection the esophagus in November.

The surgery was aborted one and a half hours in when they discovered a "spread" of a film of cancer like cells on the left pleura of the lungs. The surgical incision and the exploration of that area meant that recovery from the surgery was slow. This was hugely improved by a regime that Anders underwent at the Manhattan Advanced Medicine Clinic [MAMC] in NYC.

At tjos alternative clinic Anders was given a number of homeopathic tinctures, a restrictive diet, and alkaline, vitamin
and mineral infusions. This lasted for three weeks, after which Anders was doing incredibly well, was mobile, fit and with a healthy appetite.

After returning to London, Anders resumed conventional treatment, this time an eight-week course of radiotherapy at The Royal Marsden.

Since then he has developed severe lymphoedema which has made him quite immobile although that has improved dramatically recently. He had eight litres of fluid drained from his left lung recently and is in a lot of pain. He recently spent several days in St Raphael's Hospice where they have managed the pain with a further cocktail of drugs, although he has returned home now.

On Sunday, July 18, 2010 at 1:10 pm Eastern DST (right after our Gulf Oil intention), please send the following intention to Anders:

"My intention is for Anders Nielsen to be completely free of all cancer in his esophagus and elsewhere in his body and to be healthy and well in every way."

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Intention of the Week - Michel Habets

Help to heal his cancer

Michel Habets

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Michel Habets, 52, who lives in Japan, has cancer on his small bowel. Recently, he underwent surgery to remove the cancer. During the operation, the doctors found that the cancer had spread, and that both small and large bowels are damaged. After removing the obstructive cancer, the doctors have placed a stoma and a tube for anesthesia next to the stoma.

The doctors have now told him that without chemotherapy he has three months to live.

Although he does not want the chemo, he will take it because the doctors say that the chemo will extend his life by three years. After his first chemo treatment, he suffered many severe side effects, lost nine kilograms in weight and has trouble both sleeping or gearing himself to undergo the ordeal again.

As his Dutch friend Sylvia says: ‘ He is a very soft personality and has a great heart.’

On Sunday, July 11, 2010 at 1:10 pm Eastern DST (right after our Gulf Oil intention), please send the following intention to Michel:

"My intention is for Michel Habets to be completely free of all cancer in his bowels and elsewhere in his body and to be healthy and well in every way."

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Time's pencil

One of the most vexing problems to most physicists is the notion of time and its absolute relativity, depending on the subjectivity of the observer. In the normal course of events, we experience time as a flow, or arrow.

But during extraordinary experiences — during a mystic revelation, while taking a mind-altering drug, in a moment of madness, or even during a near-death experience (NDE) — all of us experience time rather differently: as an eternal moment of now or even, in the case of clairvoyants, as a moment in the future. (more…)

50 Ways to Leave Crude Oil (with apologies to Paul Simon)

So many of you have written in with brilliant comments to my blog last week about the Gulf oil spill that I thought I’d carry on the conversation this week.

As I wrote, it’s no good all of us demonizing BP. The bloodjet of oil pouring out of the earth now symbolizes something far deeper.  BP and all of Big Oil are engaging in deep drilling in response to overwhelming consumer demand for petroleum (manufactured or otherwise).  All of our modern-day lives are utterly intertwined with petroleum use. Petroleum is in virtually every manufactured product; it makes up the warf and woof of modern life. In order to keep up with the demand, Big Oil is drilling deeper and more dangerously. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Jennifer Harper-Deacon

Help to heal her lymph-node cancer

Jennifer Harper-Deacon

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Jennifer Harper-Deacon, former Sunday Times columnist, who has written extensively about health, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of malignant melanoma in February 2009.

Although a wide excision was delayed, in January 2010, a lump appeared in her right groin, which was confirmed as cancer. A Pet/CT scan showed it had spread from her thigh into groin and hip so in February 2010 she had a double block dissection removing all lymph nodes in her right thigh, groin and hip. Sadly, only two were confirmed as cancer and her body has been struggling to cope with this loss of 21 lymph nodes, which has caused lymphoedema and even a bout of cellulitis.

She is now at stage 3 and concerned that she will reach stage 4 when it spreads to brain, liver and lungs.

This form of cancer, she says, is resistant to all forms of conventional treatment so any healing along with natural support is the only option she believes she has.

“I pray this journey is to help others with this condition as many errors have been made in my 'care' along the way so I hope I can inspire others diagnosed with this condition in the future,” says Jennifer.

On Sunday, June 27, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for Jennifer Harper-Deacon to be free of all cancer now and in future, for her lymphatic system to adjust to the loss of nodes and not suffer with oedema, and for the inflammation and toxicity that is present in her body now to be clear."

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Well, after all, it was you and me

Last week I watched the spectacle of US Senators behaving very righteously, as they scrambled over each other to shoot BP chief executive Tony Hayward, with Hayward clumsily dodging their bullets.

The culpability for the Gulf Oil spill is being laid at Hayward’s door, as an example of individual corporate irresponsibility in the drive for ever increasing profits.

There is some truth to that, of course.  Cutting corners oN safety for profit is essentially the daily bread of corporate life. The banking industry and ongoing world financial crisis immediately come to mind. (more…)

In search of the gut hunch

One of medicine’s great textbook cases concerns a 25-year-old railroad construction foreman named Phineas P. Gage. Gage’s company, the Rutland & Burlington Railroad, was laying new tracks across Vermont in the summer of 1848, and Gage was in charge of overseeing the controlled explosions used to blast through the layers of stratified rock covering the uneven terrain.

For this exacting job, he’d had a special iron bar made that was nearly four feet long, an inch-and-a-half in diameter and weighing more than 13 pounds. After a hole was drilled into the rock, and powder, a fuse and sand inserted, the job of the iron bar was to tamp down the sand, which contains the explosion within the rock. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Vivien Russell

Help to heal her breast cancer

Vivien Russell

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Let’s send another intention to Vivien, 38, of Chinnor, Oxfordshire, whose breast cancer has spread. She is married with a six and nine year old, and has a strong will to live.

On Sunday, June 13 , 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for Vivien Russell to be free of all cancer and to be healthy and well in every way."

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Something there is that doesn’t love a wall

Green Valley, Nevada, one of the US’s burgeoning number of ‘master-planned’ and gated communities, with a population of 60,000 – the size of many middle-sized towns – is one of the world’s fastest growing types of neighborhoods, constructed with the primacy of the individual specifically in mind.

Walls of extremely precise design and construction have been firmly placed between dwellings, at the end of backyards, between sections of the community — including the wholly enclosed school and local stores — and particularly between the community and the outside world. Bans are in place prohibiting residents from altering the walls in any regard, even those on their property. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - the Gulf of Mexico oil leak

Involve your friends in containing the spill from the Deepwater Horizon site

Gulf Oil Spill

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As the spill is carrying on, I’ve had numerous special requests to carry on with our intention to to stave the flow of oil into the Gulf of Mexico from the April 20 oil rig explosion.

Let’s all take more time this Sunday to send an intention for all efforts to work and contain the spill, with minimum impact on the ecosystem of the seas. Let’s also send our intentions for all the people whose livelihood has been adversely affected.

One way may be to invite your friends to join with you as a special intention group together.

Let’s continue to send positive intention to all efforts – containment domes, relief wells and floating booms — to contain the spill, with a big focus on returning the seas to full health. On Sunday, June 6, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for the Deepwater Horizon’s oil leak to be immediately and successfully contained, and full eco-balance restored to the surrounding sea and marine life."

Check here for the time in your time zone: http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/converter.html

Strange bedfellows?

Recently, I received the latest issue of Eureka magazine, from the London Times, a periodic science publication, with a photo of cancerous lungs in a museum case. The article featured inside promised that scientists were making such magnificent discoveries about cancer that they were soon to consign specimens such as this to a museum curio. (more…)

Born to be good

“What makes Iago evil?” Joan Didion asks, opening her novel Play it As it Lays.

The more interesting question, to my mind, is what makes Desdemona – or indeed anyone — good?

Every story that we are told ingrains in us the idea that we were born to be selfish.  Left to our own devices, without the taming influence of a religion or social contract, we would act according to our true natures, which is to say meanly cold-bloodedly and entirely for self-preservation. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Justine Van Remoortere

Help to heal her abdominal cancer

Justine Van Remoortere

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Justine Van Remoortere of Brussels in Belgium, who is just 8 years old, has been diagnosed with a malign germinal cancer in her abdominal cavity. Last year, she underwent surgery, and although the surgeons could not remove all the cancer (which is in an awkward place, behind the top of the stomach, below the sternum and near the liver), the cancer went into remission for 12 months. Now it has returned.

Justine has received chemotherapy and has entered the sterile quarters of Reine Fabiola Hospital in Brussels, where she is receiving an autotransplant of bone marrow.

In the sterile part of the hospital, patients can only receive very limited number of visitors, and doctors and nurses must wear gloves, masks and gowns at all times. Hugs or any form of touch are likely to be forbidden, as the risk of infection is too great for a patient with virtually no immunity.

As her friend Lisa McManus put it, for small child, even one with Justine’s extreme courage, ‘this is a lot to take’.

Let’s send an intention to heal both Justine and her mother Nathalie, who is nearly on her own in helping Justine with this ordeal.

On Sunday, May 30, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for Justine van Remoortere to be free of all cancer and to be healthy and well in every way. I also intend for her mother to be helped and supported during this challenge."

All in this together

Normally, I don’t pay a huge amount of attention to the politics of my adopted country, usually because I happen to disagree with some aspect of policy pretty much most of the time. 

My indifference also stems from the fact that I can’t do anything about the state of affairs here, since, as an American alien resident in Britain, I can’t vote and so don’t have any say about who is in office.

But ever since the extraordinary outcome of the recent election, which resulted in a hung Parliament, and the new coalition created between the Conservatives and Liberal Democrats, I have been riveted by the course of events and by all the lessons we can learn from this turn of events in living life according to a new set of rules. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - Lorraine Pyatt-Wisdom

Help to heal her cancer

Lorraine Pyatt-Wisdom

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Lorraine Pyatt-Wisdom is 62 and lives in New York. She has been treated for the last two and a half years for cancer of the colon, liver and lung. The first tumor appeared behind her appendix and was removed; nevertheless, the cancer soon spread to the other areas. She underwent a variety of chemotherapy and other new procedures and techniques, without success.

On Sunday, May 23, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for Lorraine Pyatt-Wisdom to be healed of all cancer and to be healthy and well in every way."

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Intention of the Week - The Gulf Oil Spill

Help to contain the spill from the Deepwater Horizon site

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As the spill is carrying on, I’ve had numerous special requests to carry on with our intention to to stave the flow of oil into the Gulf of Mexico from the April 20 oil rig explosion. As Sandy Fox wrote me from H2Om Water, the spill is like "a vein that is hemorrhaging in the Earth.”

Let’s all take time this Sunday to send an intention for all efforts to work and contain the spill, with minimum impact on the ecosystem of the seas.

Some of you suggested simple positive intentions, with no mention of the rig and the ‘problems’. But as you may remember from The Intention Experiment, my research revealed that being specific tends to help, with intentions, so long as the specifics are framed positively.

Let’s continue to send positive intention to all efforts – containment domes, relief wells and floating booms — to contain the spill, with a big focus on returning the seas to full health. On Sunday, May 16, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for the Deepwater Horizon’s oil leak to be immediately and successfully contained, and full eco-balance restored to the surrounding sea and marine life."

When 10-3 = 13

Recently, an American researcher from the University of California  was conducting research on the Suya Indians of Mato Grosso, Brazil, attempting to determine how they count.  This group of Amazonian Indians are largely famous for their music; Anthony Seeger, a Professor of Ethnomusicology at the University of California, Los Angeles, who has produced a book called Why Suya Sing, says that their singing is used to create community, establish relationships and social identity and also formulate ideas about time and space.  (more…)

Thinking in pictures

Michelle Dawson, a neuroscientist, maintains that people with autism gets a bad rap. Dawson knows from whence she speaks as she herself has autism.

Medicine looks upon autism as essentially a three-pronged impairment — in communicative, imaginative and social skills. In fact, three-quarters of people with autism are classed as mentally retarded.

Dawson’s line is that far from being retarded or impaired, ‘auties’ process stimuli differently – in fact, in a way that probably renders them open to information received beyond the five senses. In fact, they are far better than the rest of us at processing all sorts of things. (more…)

Feeling like an animal

To the scientific community, an animal is essentially still perceived as nothing much more than a robot with an array of chemical processes, without the ability to register much more than the crudest pain or fear—certainly none of the more complicated human feelings such as excitement, boredom, annoyance, anger or suspicion. (more…)

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Intention of the Week - The Gulf Oil Spill

Help to contain the spill from the Deepwater Horizon site

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Many of your wrote in to request that we gather together to send an big intention to stave the flow of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, which is occurring unabated after the April 20 oil rig exploded.

Let’s send an intention for all efforts to work and contain the spill, with minimum impact on the ecosystem of the seas.

This includes sending positive intention to the 125-ton steel containment dome that crews lowered over the Deepwater Horizon site on Thursday night, plus relief wells and floating booms to contain the spill. The more that these systems work, the fewer chemicals may be needed to be pumped into the seas.

On Sunday, May 9, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website and send the following intention:

"My intention is for the Deepwater Horizon’s oil leak to be immediately and successfully contained with no damage to the environment."

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Health Intention of the Week - Vivien Russell

Help to heal her breast cancer

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Vivien Russell, 38 of Chinnor, Oxfordshire in the UK was first diagnosed with breast cancer in December 2007. It has now returned and progressed to a few places. She is married with kids of 9 and 6.

“I really have the will to live, as I also want to help others. I would be so grateful to be part of a great intention. This truly would mean the world to me. The kids are upset and my 9 year old says I can still survive this. He is a wise soul.”

Please come onto our website on May 2, 2010 at 5 pm GMT (check our website under Intention of the Week for your time zone) and send the following intention:

"My intention is that Vivien Russell be free of breast cancer and throughout her body and to be healthy and well in every way."

The human antenna

No one quite knows what to make of the pineal gland. This cone-shaped pea of a gland sits on the roof of the third ventricle of the brain, directly behind the root of the nose, floating in a small lake of cerebrospinal fluid. Because it lies in the center of the brain, neurosurgeons and radiologists have found it a useful landmark for brain surgery. (more…)

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Health Intention of the Week - Roy McClellan

Help to heal his lymphatic cancer

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On Sunday, April 25, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website, look at Linda’s photo and send the following intention:

"My intention is that Roy McClellan be free of lymphatic cancer throughout his body and to be healthy and well in every way."

Navigating without a compass

One of the thorniest problems in all of biology is how exactly a bird finds its way home. Most animals migrating over great distances appear to find their way by detecting tiny signals from the earth itself. Birds, butterflies, whales and even bacteria all respond to the  earth’s geomagnetic field. (more…)

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Health Intention of the Week - Linda Klabacha

Help her to overcome her eating disorder

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Linda Klabacha, aged 60, of Los Angeles, California, wrote us about her eating disorder. “Compulsive overeating probably sounds so minor to what you must get every day,” she wrote, "but it's just so debilitating to me."

“I've gained and lost hundreds of pounds over the course of my lifetime and have recently kept off 80 pounds for two years, but I'm bingeing again and I simply can't seem to stop. It so affects every part of my life. I don't show up at work, I have no friends because I want to isolate. . . it's a miserable day-to-day living experience."

“Maybe there's a broader intention here for curing all addictive behaviors, but I would pray for the opportunity to have people hold the intention for me to stop bingeing.”

On Sunday, April 18, 2010, at 5 pm GMT please come onto our website, look at Linda’s photo and send the following intention:

"My intention is for Linda Klabacha to be free of her eating disorder and all addictive behavior and to be healthy and well in every way."

The power of a 'supergroup'

In 1954, 22 lower middle class 11-year-old Protestant boys from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma of similar lower middleclass backgrounds, unacquainted with each other and carefully screened for psychological stability and adjustment, boarded two buses bound for a 200-acre Boy Scouts of America summer camp near Robbers Cave State Park in Oklahoma. (more…)

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Health Intention of the Week - Wilma and Kelly Guidry

Help to heal RSD and fibromyalgia

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This week’s Intention of the Week concerns a mother and daughter who live across the street from each other just outside Houston, Texas, and suffer from the same illness.

Wilma Guidry, 76, and her daughter, Kelly, 48, both have complications and intense pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD) and fibromyalgia.

'Both my mother and I are suffering and the pain has become too much for us,' writes Kelly. The pain has become so much that both of our lives have no more quality of life. Only quantity! I know usually just one person asks, but I am asking for both my mom and I as we both are suffering too much. Too much!’

Please come onto our website on April 10, 2010 at 5 pm GMT (check our website under Intention of the Week for your time zone) and send the following intention:

"My intention is that Wilma and Kelly Guidry be free of all pain and complications from RSD and Fibromyalgia and to be healthy and well in every way."

The Purifying Effect of Love: the Lake Biwa Intention Experiment, part 2

Dear friends,

Last week I reported on the results of our first live water Intention Experiment, the March 22 Lake Biwa experiment, where we have evidence that we changed the cluster structure of the water molecules. This week I’ve received the report from Dr. Konstantin Korotkov about our effect on the pH of Lake Biwa’s water.

(more…)

Praying for water: the results of the Lake Biwa Intention Experiment

I’m back from my trip to Japan, and our first live water Intention Experiment on Lake Biwa. As I’ve written earlier, this Intention Experiment had been planned 18 months ago, when Dr. Masaru Emoto, author of Messages in Water, approached me with the idea of using an Intention Experiment to purify the water in the lake.

As I mentioned in an earlier blog, Lake Biwa, one of the world's oldest lakes, supplies water to 14 million residents. Since 1983, after rapid urbanization of the surrounding land, domestic and industrial waste has changed the population of microorganisms in the lake, causing outbreaks of red tides, water bloom and water weeds and a moldy odor.

It was the perfect first target for first live experiment.
For this experiment, I enlisted Russian physicist Dr. Konstantin Korotkov of St. Petersburg State Technical University, who has worked with us on two earlier experiments: the First and Second Korotkov Water Experiment. Dr. Korotkov, you may recall, invented the Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer.

Korotkov captures the tiny pulse of photons emitted by all living things by stirring them up — ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal.

Korotkov’s equipment blends several techniques: photography, measurements of light intensity and computerized pattern recognition. When used on humans, his camera takes pictures of the field around each of the 10 fingers.

A computer program then extrapolates from this a real-time image of the ‘biofield’ surrounding the person and deduces from it the state of health in the case of a person.

Water’s cluster structure
As with our Water experiment with Pennsylvania State University materials science expert Dr. Rustum Roy, we were examining whether intention can changes the molecular structure of water. Any changes in the light emissions of water indicate changes in the clustering of water molecules.

The ‘structure’ of water, from a scientific point of view, refers to the molecular arrangements of individual water molecules (which are, you know two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen). The molecules form units, or ‘clusters’, which remain stable anywhere from a part of a second to several weeks.

Think of water molecules as analogous to pieces of Lego, which cluster together, continuously forming different configurations.

The way in which water molecules cluster together can vary enormously. For instance, water can contain molecular clusters of up to several hundred H2O units apiece.

Water molecules adhere to each other not only through hydrogen bonds but also a wide range of very weak bonds (known as van der Waals bonds).

The presence of very weak bonds enables water molecules to change clustering with remarkable ease by very subtle radiation, including the power of intention.

This change of structure can change fundamental properties, even if the composition of the water doesn’t change.

A perfect example of this is diamond and graphite. Both share identical composition, yet diamond is one of the hardest substances on earth and graphite one of the softest.

Water grows polluted from a number of sources, including bacteria, chemicals or even a change in temperature. These changes can also change the clustering of its H2O molecules. Molecules of healing water or clean water cluster together in very different patterns than that of polluted water.

So changing molecular structure is one highly powerful way to use intention to purify water.

Water with a high degree of structure (strong regular structure) is found in in the cytoplasm of healthy tissue and a variety of healing waters like that of Lourdes.

Tests on liquids
Korotkov and his team have carried out a great deal of research on a great variety of biological liquids, including water, showing that the GDV equipment is highly sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical contents of liquids — subtle changes that don’t show up in ordinary chemical analyses.

For instance, Korotkov discovered statistically significant differences between the blood samples of healthy people and those patients suffering from cancer or heart disease. He has also found statistically significant changes in water after it was irradiated — even when when homeopathic remedies diluted 30 times were added to it.

Preparing the water
On Sunday March 21, I traveled with my family to Lake Biwa, which is outside of Kyoto, Japan. The night before Dr. Emoto’s conference was to begin, my husband I climbed out onto the rocks of Lake Biwa to collect two samplings of water in two different glasses.

We then carried the glasses to Dr. Korotkov’s hotel room, where we photographed our target glass and then our control.

Those photographs were both uploaded in my computer and whisked off to our Copperstrings web team in India, who readied our on-line experiment for the following day.

Meanwhile, Dr. Korotkov took measurements with his GDV instrument using a syringe installation before the experiment. He also measured the pH of the water before and during the experiment.

I arranged with Copperstrings to have our experiment run at 12 noon Japan time – exactly the time I would run the experiment at Lake Biwa. I began my lecture at 11 am, and at exactly noon, showed my audience of more than 500 both the glass of water and the photo of the glass that was uploaded on our Clean Water Experiment site.

After powering up, our audience (as well as our worldwide audience over the internet) sent an intention of love to the water and were told to imagine it like a mountain stream.

After our intention, Dr. Korotkov measured the water with his equipment again.
To register the subtlest of changes, he examined many parameters, including the power of the signal (its area) and the spectrum of the signal (its intensity) and its form co-efficient (the measure of a physical or chemical property that is constant for a system under specified conditions — such as, say, friction.

As you can see from the figures below, he found a statistical different in the area and intensity of the light signal (first chart) and also its form co-efficient (second chart).

The red bar represents our control glass and the blue bar our target glass.

Interestingly, after our influence, the power of the signal waned, but not its intensity.

This would indicate that we made a permanent change.
As Korotkov writes: ‘All presented results demonstrate that collective intentional mental influence has significant effect both on water parameters and on the condition of the space. These results give us one more indication of the power of our mind.’

Next week we will report on the pH and the involvement of our international audience.

Have a blessed and restful Easter weekend.

Warmest wishes,
Lynne McTaggart

The Lake Biwa Clean Water Experiment

As I’ve told you in earlier weeks, we will be taking our Intention Experiment live to Japan on March 22 for the first ‘live’ Clean Water Experiment.

But I also have some really exciting news. If you cannot join us in Lake Biwa, you can still join us in the world’s largest Water Intention Experiment — right in front of your own computer. (more…)

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Peter Henrik Pieters

Please help him to be cancer free

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Peter Pieters, aged 41, presently in Amersfoort, The Netherlands, was diagnosed with a low grade glioma (Astrocytoma grade II) brain tumor three years ago after suffering a seizure. The tumor is larger than 8.5 cm and is located on the frontal right site of his head.

He is having surgery on March 9 in Utrecht to remove as much of the tumor as possible while minimizing damage to the normal brain.

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT and send the following intention to Peter for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Peter be completely free of all cancer, that the doctors successfully remove all the tumor without damaging his brain and that he is healthy and well in every way."

Water into Wine: Your Questions Answered

So many of you commented on our Water into Wine results – both positively and negatively — that I asked psychologist Gary Schwartz, director of the Laboratory of Advancement in Consciousness and Health of the University of Arizona, who designed our experiment, and his lab technician Mark Boccuzzi, to respond to your questions. (more…)

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Health Intention of the Week - Vivien Russell

Please send healing intention to her cancer

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Vivien Russell, 38, of Chinnor, in Oxfordshire, UK, was first diagnosed with breast cancer in December 2007. It has now returned and progressed to a few places. Vivien is married with two children, aged 9 and 6.

She wrote us: "I really have the will to live, as I also want to help others. I would be so grateful to be part of a great intention. This truly would mean the world to me. The kids are upset , and my 9 year old says I can still survive this. He is a wise soul."

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT (noon US Eastern time), and send the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Vivien Russell be healed of all cancer and be healthy and well in every way."

I'll be there

Presently, I’m in the midst of collating more information about our recent Water into Wine Intention Experiment, including what happened to our participants. Each time, a small miracle happens — a miracle I continue to try to understand.

As you know, our ongoing Intention Experiment runs on two levels. We both conduct our large-scale well-controlled scientific experiments and also informal intentions within our community or during my workshops for people with health or financial challenges.
(more…)

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Health Intention of the Week - Nellie Wang

Please send healing intention to her cancer

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Nellie Wang, of Marina del Rey, California, is suffering from multiple cancers – stomach, kidney and pancreatic cancers, currently at stage 4. She was at UCLA Medical Center and undergoing treatment for pain and nutritional management, but recently was released and is now back home.

Please come onto our website on Sunday, February 21, 2010 at 5pm GMT (noon US Eastern time) and send the following intention for 10 minutes:

“My intention is that Nellie Wang be healed of all cancer and be healthy and well in every way.”

Results of the January 30 Water into Wine Experiment

I’ve just heard back from psychologist Dr. Gary Schwartz, director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Healing, and his chief lab technician Mark Boccuzzi, both at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. They have just finished analyzing the results of our historic January 30 Water into Wine Experiment, which I want to share with you.

Like all science, even the simplest experiments take a good deal of planning and many steps to carry them out. Here’s how we did it, and here’s what happened.

Preparation
Five days before the Saturday experiment, Mark filled up two 300 ml beakers (labeled “Beaker #1” and “Beaker #2”) with simple Tucson tap water.

Two days before the experiment, I wrote “Beaker #1” and “Beaker #2” on two pieces of paper, folded them, juggled them about, and chose one at random. Usually my youngest daughter performs this crucial part of the experiment for me, but this time, she was at school so I stepped in.

The target turned out to be Beaker #2, below:

Here’s the actual recording setup with the sensors, holders, Vernier PC interface, and computer.

I immediately emailed the photo of the beaker to my web team at CopperStrings, located in India, who were preparing our experiment pages. Each Intention Experiment gets assembled using the expertise of people from three continents, which just goes to show what an international effort this is.

As with all our experiments, both Mark and Dr. Schwartz were deliberately ‘blinded’ — they did not know which beaker was selected as the target for distant global intention until after the experiment was finished and they’d performed their calculations.

The twenty-minute experiment
On January 30, the Intention Experiment was carried out for 20 minutes in total: a five-minute period to ‘Power Up’ (following the special program I developed to focus the mind and heart); a five- minute ‘Instruction’ period to read about water pH, why we were doing this intention and how the experiment would work; and then the 10- minute period of the actual experiment, where the image of Beaker 2 was revealed to our participants, who were told to hold a specific intention to lower the pH of the water by at least 1 pH measure.

As with all our recent experiments, our Copperstrings web team control all the pages, so that they flip over automatically during the experiment. As usual, one of the team was on hand for two hours before the experiment started to well afterward, and we had virtually no reports of problems in participating.

We also asked our participants to focus on an image of pH scale and to imagine the water’s pH moving toward the acidic (or red) side of the scale. During the intention, the participants were instructed to imagine the water tasting more like wine and to do so with all their five senses.

Meanwhile, Mark, back in Tucson, then took recordings of pH and temperature twice every second for five minutes before our experiment started, during all the time of our Power Up period, Instruction period, and Intention period, and for five minutes after the experiment. In total, his equipment monitored pH and temperature in the two beakers for a half hour.

Beside this ACTIVE Experiment (where we were actually sending intention), the following week, the Tucson scientists set up an identical DUMMY Experiment. In this experiment, they designated Beaker #2 as the ‘intention’ beaker, and ran the entire experiment for the exact same length of time, but this time there were no participants, no procedure on the web and no intention sent to either beaker.

Having a DUMMY Experiment provides scientists with more information, in order to control for any variables.

Our results
Here’s the simple raw data of pH and temperature of the two beakers, recorded by the sensors and then displayed by the Logger Pro software, for first the ACTIVE and then the DUMMY Experiments.

ACTIVE EXPERIMENT (our actual Water into Wine Experiment) (Fig.1)

DUMMY EXPERIMENT (Fig.2)

The upper graph in the ACTIVE Experiment chart represents the pH data for the two beakers and the lower graph represents the temperature data, plotted for that half hour period before, during and after the experiment.

The red line in the first graph represents the pH reading for Beaker #2 (our target), and the blue line its temperature. The green line is the pH and orange squiggle the temperature reading of Beaker #1 — the control.

In the DUMMY Experiment, the scientists imitated the real experiment exactly, by designating Beaker #2 the ‘target’ and Beaker #1 the ‘control’.

The same colors apply to pH and temperature for the two beakers in this DUMMY Experiment.

Note that as soon as Mark inserted the pH sensors, the pH rose rapidly and then began to stabilize.

You’ll also note Beaker #2 was always slightly cooler than Beaker #1 (in both Experiments), which may have had something to do with the placement of the beakers relative to the computer monitor.

During both experiments, the temperature in both beakers decreased as time went on. Nevertheless, it began to recover in the DUMMY Experiment more than in the ACTIVE Experiment.

Studying the results more closely
In order to carefully analyze our results, Mark and Dr. Schwartz then thin-sliced the time frame further, so that even the subtlest of changes would show up more clearly. Here are the graphs for pH for the ACTIVE and DUMMY Experiments, shown below.

In this expanded scale, it is now easy to see that the pH of our target Beaker #2 (the red line) is consistently lower than that of Beaker #1 (the green line) for both sessions, again possibly because of the position of the two beakers relative to the computer monitor.

ACTIVE Session pH (Fig. 3)

DUMMY Session pH (Fig. 4)

Nevertheless, a close examination of the 10-minute Intention period reveals a slight decrease in pH for the Target Beaker #2 (red) compared to the Control Beaker #1 (green). Interestingly, the five-minute Instruction period (directly preceding the 10-minute Intention period), and the five-minute Post-intention period both show pH increasing for the Target Beaker compared with the Control Beaker.

These patterns are less prominent in the DUMMY Experiment’s results for pH, which stayed relatively steady through the entire Experiment (fig. 4).

Temperature changes
The next two sets of graphs show the data for temperature — again examined in closer detail for a clearer snapshot of any subtle changes.

ACTIVE Experiment Temperature (Fig. 5)

DUMMY Experiment Temperature (Fig. 6)

Close examination of these two sets of graphs again reveals a subtle but meaningful trend, says Dr. Schwartz. In our actual ACTIVE Experiment (Fig. 5), the temperature of the Targeted Beaker #2 (shown in blue) decreases between the first half and the second half of the ten- minute Intention Period. The Control Beaker #1’s temperature (shown in orange) stayed relatively steady.

In other words, our decrease in pH during the exact time we sent intention was paralleled by a small but measurable decrease in temperature (compared to the matched control).

Furthermore, as you can see in the graph, the decreased temperature is maintained in the five-minute Post-intention period.

The difference between Targeted and Non-Targeted beakers is clearer in the ACTIVE Experiment (Fig. 5), when compared to the DUMMY Experiment (Fig.6). In the Dummy Experiment, the the Targeted and Non-Targeted beakers show a consistent and parallel path throughout the experiment, including a decrease over the ten-minute “intention” period - even though, of course, no intention was actually sent for that experiment.

Furthermore, during the five-minute Post-intention period, the temperature in both beakers moved in the opposite direction to that of our Target Beaker. The temperature rose in both beakers in the DUMMY Experiment, whereas the temperature fell with the Target of our ACTUAL Experiment.

What does this all mean?
It means, quite simply, that we had a small, positive result — a measurable lowering of both pH and temperature in our TARGET beaker, compared to the control of the ACTIVE Experiment and the two beakers in the DUMMY Experiment.

“The trends observed in this exploratory experiment are consistent with our prediction that global distant intention to lower the pH of tap water could have a measurable effect on decreasing the pH of water in a controlled, blinded experiment,” Dr. Schwartz concluded.

Furthermore, the effects were observed exactly during the 10-minute window of our Intention. “Moreover, adds Dr. Schwartz, “these effects were paralleled in the temperature of tap water, and were observed in both the Intention and POST periods,” he adds.

Although the effects were small (a part of a pH and a degree of temperature) it’s well to remember that subtle changes in pH or temperature can improve or disturb a live body of water – or indeed an entire ecosystem damaged by modern pollution. We do well to realize that just a change of a half pH in our bodies would cause life-threatening illness, if not kill us.

In this, our first exploratory experiment into pH, we discovered that positioning of the beakers may matter, as Beaker #2 had consistently lower pH and temperature values than Beaker #1 in both our ACTIVE and DUMMY Experiments.

Nevertheless, the observed effects of our intention on the pH and temperature were larger than any possible effects from position, Dr. Schwartz concludes.

As we replicate this experiment in the future, we’ll get enough data to control for position. We’ll also examine the pH levels over longer periods of time to determine whether our changes remain constant.

Our thanks and blessings to Dr. Schwartz, Mark and their entire University of Arizona lab and also to our web team at Copperstrings for pulling off a flawless experiment.

So this, our 19th experiment, is also our 16th successful Intention Experiment – demonstrating, once again, that our collective thoughts have the power to change – perhaps even heal – our world. Every experiment brings us that much closer to understanding what intention can and cannot do.

What happens next?
It’s time to focus, for the first time, on a real live target — namely a real and highly polluted body of water. I’m partnering with Masaru Emoto and four prominent scientists (to run four Intention Experiments on Lake Biwa, near Kyoto in Japan on March 22, which also happens to be the United Nation’s World Water Day. See: http://lakebiwaevent.com if you would like to come to this historic event. And stay tuned for more information about our planned simultaneous Intention Experiment, which I hope to run live over the internet so that all of you can take part.

Heaven knows

Those of you outside of the UK where I live undoubtedly heard about last November’s ‘Climategate’, where 1,000 e-mails and 2,000 documents covering climate change research from 1996 until 2009 came to light after computers at the UK’s University of East Anglia were hacked into.

The controversy concerned a small batch of emails, suggesting that some of the scientists in question file-drawed material that doesn’t fit their hypotheses about global warming. This week, I’ve been a fascinated spectator as an independent inquiry attempts to make sense of the whole business — and indeed the whole science.

Don’t get me wrong. I believe that human beings, particularly those of us in the developed world, have to a great deal to learn about sharing more and consuming less on every front. Nevertheless, what is always missing from any debate on climate change is the effects of the planets and how they interrelate with us on earth.

Gravitational effects
Several years ago, a University of Toronto physicist named Jerry Mitrovica and Alessandro Forte, of the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, published a paper in the prestigious scientific journal Nature showing, through mathematical calculations and simulations, a relationship between tiny changes in the earth’s shape and axial rotation, and the gravitational effects of other planets in our solar system, particularly Jupiter and Saturn.

The paper was fairly technical and the ideas a little obscure. Nevertheless, beneath all the science, they were making big claims.

“We’re showing for the first time that changes in the Earth’s shape, when coupled with the gravitational effects from other planets, can produce large changes in the Earth’s climate,” said Mitrovica, who is working on behalf of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (Earth Systems Evolution).

In his mathematical model, Mitrovica has shown that the earth’s orbit is affected by the gravitational pull of Saturn and Jupiter and, at some point during the last 20 million years, the earth encountered gravitational ‘resonance’ with the orbits of Jupiter and Saturn, which ultimately influenced the angle of tilt of the earth’s axis during that period.

Profound effect on climate change
Scientists realize that the slightest change in the earth’s axis has a profound effect on climate, because it changes the pattern of sunlight falling on the earth.

“To understand climate on Earth, it’s clear that we need to consider the Earth as this dynamic deforming system,” Mitrovica says. “But we also need to understand, more than we thought we did, the Earth’s place in the solar system.”

The gravitational pull of any particular planet is extraordinarily small, and many scientists don’t believe that, on its own, it would have much of an effect on the earth’s geomagnetic field.

However, some researchers including chronobiology expert Franz Halberg of the University of Minnesota believe that there are ‘tidal’ effects, in which the gravitational forces of the various planets also interact with the magnetic fields of the sun and moon as well as the solar wind.

This, then, has a cumulative effect on the magnetosphere — the geomagnetic field encasing the earth — which, ultimately, can have profound effects on climate and also biology.

Furthermore, as all the planets are exerting gravitational effects on each other, this would have, as one researcher pointed out, a ‘non-linear’, or ‘chaotic’, effect.

Resonance effects
In an article published in 1989 in the journal New Scientist, Carl Murray, a reader in astronomy at Queen Mary College, University of London, noted that the reason that the planets orbit in an elliptical shape or rotate on their axis in a particular degree of tilt has to do with various gravitational effects.

The resonance effect can also be established between two planets when the time periods of their rotations around each other lock into a regular mathematical relationship. For instance, the moon rotates around the earth at the same time period as it rotates on its own axis. Other planets may circle around each other at two to three times what it takes them to rotate on their own axis. These relationships can slow down or speed up a rotation slightly and have a profound effect upon weather or even biological life.

These kinds of gravitational effects are magnified when a variety of planets are in alignment, such as occurs during an eclipse.

A greater effect than gravity is the electromagnetic effect of the planets, as the fields created by each solar body interact and affect the sun, the moon and, of course, the earth. Indeed, some scientists believe that it is the influence of planetary fields from the earth and the other planets that trigger solar activity like sunspots, and not the reverse.

It is also known that the interplanetary magnetic field (the space between the earth and the sun) and the earth’s geomagnetic envelope interact more during the equinoxes, largely due to the earth’s spin on its axis.

Scientists have long known that when planets are at major angles to each other (at 90 or 180 degrees, for instance), they will affect reception of radio signals. It is also known that when the earth is positioned at a particular angle to one of the major planets, such as Saturn, Jupiter or Venus, this, too, will affect the formation of sunspots or bursts of solar plasma.

These subtle interrelationships of electromagnetic fields and increases in solar activity once again, could add up to large effects on earth.

Strange sun
At the moment, the sun is acting strangely. Several years ago, NASA and the Max Planck Institute in Germany, recorded a record-breaking number of sunspots and coronal mass ejections — a ‘unique solar maximum in history’, noted George Withbroe, director of NASA’s Sun-Earth Connection Office.

According to a number of scientists, such as Dr. Alexey Dmitriev, a geologist with Russia’s Academy of Science, this is likely to cause a ‘general reorganization of the electro-magnetosphere of our planet’. Dmitriev also notes that the earth’s magnetic poles are shifting, to a major inversion.

It may not be too farfetched to suggest that this massive change in geomagnetics could not only cause a change in our weather but also in ourselves after the peak of this cycle: 2012.

This all is a little humbling. The modern human conceit is to think of ourselves every way, as top dog — at the very apex of the chain of being and the most influential entity in the universe.

Some of this research suggests that our little planet is knocked about by the capriciousness of the heavens, most particularly that ball of hydrogen crossed with a layer of unstable magnetic fields — roughly the size of one hundred earths — that is responsible for our very existence.

Humble servant
What I’m suggesting is not to go out a buy a four-wheel drive, but rather to understand our our place in the universe — not as its master so much as its humble servant. We and all the other living things of the earth are simply be part of a vast, complex energy system, and we do well, as I noted in my Powering Up program, to time intention at certain strategic solar configurations.

We would do well to learn from ancient cultures, which had a far greater respect and appreciation and respect for planetary influences. They knew when the heavens were angry and when to lay low.

Perhaps it is time to step back from climate change and to understand that it may not be all man’s fault. We simply may not have the power.

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Health Intention of the Week - Gerrie Tuitert

Help to heal her lung and liver cancer

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Gerrie Tuitert, who is currently in Deventer, the Netherlands, had lung cancer. She underwent five sessions of chemotherapy, although doctors now find she doesn’t have the cancer she was treated for.

Although the cancer had metastasized to the liver, they couldn’t find any living tissue, but instead found a virus that has grown into an abscess, for which she is receiving high doses of antibiotics.

The doctors are now considering more chemo to rid her body of the liver metastasis, even though it only contains dead tissue.

Please come onto our website on Sunday, February 7, 2010 and send the following intention for 10 minutes:

'My intention is that Gerrie Tuitert will be free of all cancer in her body and the virus in her liver, and be healthy and well in every way.'

It's only fair

In the past few weeks, I was fascinated to watch the spectacle of Goldman Sachs and the other of the big four banks thumbing their nose at the public and President Barack Obama by pledging billions in record bonuses at the same time that a stellar lineup of celebrities volunteered to man the phones during a telethon designed to entice ordinary working people to cough up donations for Haiti.

The contrast between the two scenarios particularly fascinated me because at the moment, I am immersed in studying fairness.

Fehr on fairness
The aptly named Swiss economist Ernst Fehr from the University of Zurich, now based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, has made his life’s work the study of the economics of fairness. Fehr has conducted the most well known studies demonstrating not only that that people are inherently fair and generous, but also have an inherent abhorrence of what he likes to call ‘inequity aversion’.

Fehr has exhaustively tested out his theory with the classic game- theory study called the Ultimatum Game. In this game, groups of volunteers are randomly paired although never allowed to meet. The pairs are then split off into ‘proposers’ and ‘responders’. The proposer is given a sum of money — say $10 — and allowed to offer the responder any amount of money, from $1 to $10, that he sees fit, while the responder’s job is simply to accept or reject the offer.

If he accepts it, he will receive the sum designated, while the proposer keeps the rest. If the responder rejects the offer, however, both leave empty-handed.

This is a one-time-only offer; both parties know there is no possibility of holding out for a better deal.

If human beings were innately selfish, it would make perfect sense for the proposer always to make the most derisory offer, and to keep the lion’s share, and it would also benefit the responder always to accept it, as something, no matter how little, is better than nothing.
Furthermore, there is no social pressure as they will never be given the other’s identity or interact again.

However, in practice, this almost never happens. Although about a quarter of people in total will act for self-interest, the most common offer is 50 per cent, and the overall average ranges between 43-48 per cent. Even though they stand to lose, the average person would rather share equally with people he hasn’t met and never will meet again.

Even more interesting, people tend to punish those who push the boundaries of unfairness. Those playing Ultimatum Game generally reject any offer below 20 per cent. If they’re playing with $10, any offers of $2 or below are rejected.

An impulse to punish
Social scientists call this impulse ‘altruistic punishment’ – our desire to punish unfairness, even at a cost to ourselves. This tends to suggest that we have a strongly honed sense of fair play, or what Fehr and his colleagues refer to as strong reciprocity — the will to cooperate with others and to punish those who violate the social contract of cooperation.

So strong is this impulse in human beings that we are willing to to cut off our own nose, so to speak. We would rather go home empty-handed than allow someone to take more than their fair share.

Save our parks
The domino effect of unfairness has been proved in game theory, with a game called the ‘Public Goods’, another standard in experimental economics. This game is designed to test how people behave when asked to contribute to something that could benefit the entire community but one in which they have no personal motivation to give.

It’s a bit like asking people to voluntarily pay taxes in order to maintain the parks in California. In this scenario, a number of participants are given tokens, which are redeemable at the end for money. They’re allowed to secretly decide how much of it to keep and how much to put into a common pot.

The experimenters will then award some percentage of the total, such as 40 per cent, in the pot to everyone playing.

The most strategic players will soon realize that the best you can do under any circumstance, regardless of what anyone else does is not to put anything into the pot, but to keep all your money yourself, lest you become victim to freeloaders.

However, this almost never happens among the wide number of experiments carried out by Fehr and other social psychologists; most people add something to the pot and the average is for people to give up half their tokens to the public good.

Punishing freeloaders
However, a very different scenario emerges during games run as a ‘repeat’ after 10 rounds. In that instance, as Fehr discovered. the enormous initial impulse to give rapidly fades so that by the final rounds, nearly three-quarters of all people contribute nothing and a large further batch, close to nothing.

When interviewed later, those participants who’d initially been generous grew increasingly furious at the freeloaders, who were contributing nothing and retaliated in the only mode of punishment they had: to stop contributing to the public fund.

This is a salutary lesson to the bankers as well as all the rest of us. Our entire society entirely rests upon a sense of fairness among the population. Take far more than your fair share and ultimately all of society’s cooperation falls apart.

The rich get poorer
That is evident in the research carried out by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett in their book Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Always Do Better. After researching the social conditions of virtually every Western country, Wilkinson and Pickett discovered that in countries of the very rich with giant income disparity, everybody — both the most affluent and the very poorest — suffer from higher rates of ill health, higher crime rates, mental illness, environmental problems and violence.

The UK, the US and many countries in Europe, with their vast difference between rich and poor, are among the worse off in virtually every social indicator than countries like Sweden, with less wealth disparity in the population.

My husband Bryan came up with an ingenious idea that just might redeem the banks in the public eye and restore community spirit.

Here’s what you do, Goldman Sachs. Simply take half the bonus money you and the rest of the big four are planning to pay out in bonuses, pledge it to Haiti and you more than cover the $12 billion needed to rebuild the country.

A word to Julia Roberts; get off the phone with Joe Sixpack and have a word with GS’s Lloyd Blankfein. He hasn’t much time for Barack, but he might just listen to you.

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Health Intention of the Week - Haitian survivors

Send them healing intention

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Send them healing intention

While we’re all gathered together this weekend, let’s come onto the site again on Sunday, January 31, 2010 and send out a special intention for the survivors of Haiti.

Please come onto the website on Sunday January 31, 2010 at 12 noon US Eastern Standard time and hold the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that the survivors of the Haiti earthquake receive enough financial and emotional support to rebuild their country and their lives."

Our water into wine experiment

Register Today For Tomorrow’s Water Into Wine Experiment
www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com

Earlier this week I spoke at length to Dr. Gary Schwartz, the noted psychologist and director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health of the University of Arizona, our partner in this latest experiment. He and his lab technician Mark Boccuzzi (who is now thankfully fully recovered from swine flu) are standing by, with all systems ready for our WATER INTO WINE EXPERIMENT on Saturday, January 30, 2010, at 12 noon Eastern Standard Time.

They have sent me photos of two beaker of water (labeled ‘1 and 2’). Each has been set up and monitored since Tuesday with a pH sensor. The pH sensor will record the pH of the water.

PH sensors
The pH sensors continually monitor the pH of each water sample. As of Wednesday, our water samples had a pH of roughly 8, which is typical of sea water.

Each water sample also is also being continuously monitored with a thermister, a kind of electronic thermometer that continuously measures minute changes in temperature.

As Dr. Schwartz explained, pH changes as a function of temperature. So if intention changes the pH of our water sample, we want to determine if our intention also changed the water temperature as well — and by how much.

We’ve prepared two beakers, with one to act as our target and the other — which will have no intention sent to it — to act as our control. I have had a family member randomly choose one beaker as our target, which I will unveil to you during the experiment next Saturday.

However, the scientists will remain ‘blind’ to our target – that is, they won’t be be given any information about which sample we chosen – until AFTER the experimental results are calculated. That way, we ensure that the results are scientific.

Tomorrow I’ve reveal the actual intention we’re going to use.

Dr. Schwartz may also keep another computer running during the experiment, which has been programmed to calibrate any changes, such as whether any additional energies, amounting to ‘spirit’, are present during our intention. It will be an interesting test to see if we are aided in our endeavors by a ‘higher power’.

Why we’re doing this experiment
One of our readers wrote in the other day to say that this was a useless endeavor. Why not heal countries, end wars or famine?

However, what sets The Intention Experiment apart is that we are attempting to validate intention scientifically. That means we have to choose targets for which any change due to intention can be measured scientifically. And that requires using strict laboratory procedure to demonstrate that we’ve had an effect.

We are working toward all those big plans —hunger, pollution, war — but at the moment we are taking baby steps.

First LIVE Intention Experiment
Furthermore, this experiment, like our other Clean Water Experiments, is a trial run for experiments to begin on real bodies of water.

Many water beds around the world are polluted with too much industrial waste and are too acid. Other water bodies have disturbed ecosystems and so are now too alkaline. Being able to change pH is vital to cleaning up polluted water.

I am going to run the first Intention Experiment in a LIVE setting at Lake Biwa in Japan during World Water Day on March 22. This giant will feature, myself, Dr. Masaru Emoto, Dr. Eric Pearl and Dr. Konstantin Korotkov, among many others.

That Lake is highly polluted. I am arranging to conduct FOUR Intention Experiments that day, some at the site and some remotedly, with scientists in several parts of America. So tomorrow’s outcome will give us some important clues about what we can and cannot do.

So get set to participate, but remember these steps:

1. REGISTER TODAY at www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com if you haven’t already. Don’t wait until the time of the experiment or it might be difficult to get through the web traffic on the registration page.
2. ENLIST ALL YOUR LIKEMINDED FRIENDS to sign up, too. We want big numbers participating.
3. TOMORROW, GO DIRECTLY TO www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com.
4. LOGIN EARLY at least a half hour before the experiment (or more) to avoid a logjam.
5. FOLLOW INSTRUCTIONS to the letter. After powering up, the pages will flip over automatically and you’ll read a description of the intention. The pages will then flip over again and you’ll be told to hold a particular intention for 10 minutes. Music will also play during that time. At the end of the 10 minutes, the page should flip over to signal that the Intention Experiment is over.
6. JOIN THE COMMUNITY DISCUSSION Click on the button there at the end of the experiment or go to www.theintentionexperiment.ning.com. Tell our community from 90 countries around the world how it was for you.

For full instructions, see: https://lynnemctaggart.com/intention/how-to-participate

The power of pH

The pH of a substance, as you probably remember, measures the acidity or basicity of a solution.

Clean water —is usually 7 or neutral, if it is pure — whereas polluted water often a pH that is either more acidic or more alkaline.

Water grows polluted from a number of sources — pathogens, like bacteria or parasites, organic and inorganic chemicals, from detergents to pesticides and industrial waste, and also physical changes, such as a change in temperature from industrial sources.

These changes can also alter the pH of water – either making it too alkali or too acidic. Natural ‘healthy’ rainwater is supposed to have a neutral pH of 7 and most rainwater now is between 5 and 6.

Industrial plants emit acidifying gases such as sulphuric oxides and carbon monoxide, which can change the pH of the rain water to 4 or below. This is why rain with this artificially lowered pH is often referred to as ‘acid rain’.

Certain polluting organisms such as algae, on the other hand, can make the water too alkaline.

So an obvious target, when trying to clean up polluted water, is to change pH. We already have evidence that pH is very responsive to intention. Dr. Melinda Connor, director of the Karen Connor Optimal Healing Research program and a scientist who has worked with Dr. Schwartz at the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health at the University of Arizona, has designed pH experiments to test the ability of experienced healers to change pH.

When I spent time with her at the ISSSEEM conference last June she told me that she has created a particular protocol she asks highly experienced healers to use that can lower pH by several units — more or less permanently.

So I wondered: can ‘ordinary’ intenders make this happen too?

We have some evidence that pH is highly responsive to intention from the work of former Stanford University physicist William Tiller. Tiller has conducted what are some of the most extraordinary studies about the power of intention.

Using a simple black box, the size of a remote control, with an electrically erasable, programmable, read-only memory (EEPROM) component, he has ‘charged’ these devices with human intention and then used them to affect a variety of chemical processes. His experiment rests on the unthinkable assumptions that thoughts can be imprisoned in a bit of electronic memory and later ‘released’ to affect the physical world.

In the late nineties, Tiller gathered together experienced meditators, had them all enter a deep meditative state, and asked them to embed the equipment with a highly specific intention to affect a particular target.

Each time Tiller chose experimental targets that could show a genuine, measurable change, including water pH.

He chose to see if intention can change the pH of water because water pH remains fairly static and tiny changes of one-hundredth or even one-thousandth of a unit on the pH scale can be measured; a change of a full unit or more on the pH scale would represent an enormous shift that was unlikely to be the result of an incorrect measurement.

In both instances, his meditators imprinted intentions into the black boxes to change the pH of water both up and down by a full pH unit.

Shipped to another lab
Tiller would then wrapped the imprinted black box, or the ‘Intention-Imprinted Electronic Device’, in aluminium foil and placed it in another Faraday cage until ready for shipping. On separate days he shipped each box via FedEx to the Minnesota laboratory, some 1500 miles away.

Tiller also prepared an identical control box that had not been ‘imprinted’ with intention by wrapping it in aluminium foil and placing it in an electrically grounded Faraday cage, in order to screen out electromagnetic frequencies of all magnitudes.

He had been careful to blind the experiment so that his lab technicians would not know which device contained the intention and which the control when the two devices arrived.

In the water experiments, the meditators were successful; their intentions managed to change the pH up and down by one unit.

Conditioned space
After three months, Tiller noticed that the results of his studies began to improve; the more he repeated the experiment, the stronger and quicker the effects.

He then did some investigations to try to find if there were any aspects of the laboratory that might be responsible.

After discovering that the air temperature appeared to be going up and down according to a regular rhythm or oscillation, dipping and climbing at regular intervals, Tiller then measured the pH of water in the lab and measured its capacity to conduct electricity.

He observed the same phenomenon as he had with the temperature: periodic oscillations of at least one-quarter of a unit on the pH scale, and regular dips and peaks in the water’s ability to conduct electricity.

Tiller was especially intrigued by the changes in pH. The acid/alkaline balance in any substance is highly sensitive to change; if the pH of a person’s blood shifts up or down by just a half a pH unit, it means that they are dying or already dead.

Energetic harmony
A pattern was developing: as the temperature of the air rose, the pH fell, and vice versa, in near perfect harmonic rhythm. The water’s electrical conductivity showed a similar harmonic cycle. Somehow his lab was beginning to manifest different material properties, almost as if it were a specially charged environment.
The effects also continually increased. No matter which experiment he carried out, the longer the imprinted devices were in the room, the larger the rhythmic fluctuations of the temperature and pH.

These fluctuations remained unaffected by the opening of doors or windows, the operation of air conditioners or heaters, and even the presence or movement of humans or objects around their immediate vicinity. When he compared graphs of air and water temperature readings, they again mapped in perfect harmony.

Every corner of the room that was measured registered the same result. Each aspect of the physical space appeared to be in some sort of rhythmic, energetic harmony.

Human intention captured in Tiller’s little black boxes were somehow ‘conditioning’ the spaces where the experiments were carried out.

After the imprinted boxes had been turned on for a while, the effect became relatively ‘permanent’; the target, whether water pH, ALP or fruit flies, would continue to be affected even if the device was not in the lab.

Although this influence decayed very slowly over time, Tiller’s laboratories appeared to have undergone some long-term thermodynamic transformation. The energy from intention appeared to ‘charge’ the environment and create a domino effect of order.

The constant replaying of ordered thoughts seemed to be changing the physical reality of the room, and making the quantum virtual particles of empty space more ‘ordered’. And then, like a domino effect, the ‘order’ of the space appeared to assist the outcome of the experiment. Carrying out the intentions in one particular space appeared to enhance their effects over time.

Our Water into Wine experiment
So affecting pH of water can have many extraordinary implications. On January 30, we’re going to attempt to make water more acidic, but in future, we’ll try the reverse.

Let’s all see if we can use our thoughts to bring the water back to basics.

So to join us Saturday, January 30, 2010, at 5 pm GMT (12 noon Eastern Standard time). And don’t forget to register: www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com.

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Mike Spencer

Help to heal his kidney cancer

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Michael Spencer, aged 55, of Deland, Florida, has stage IV renal (kidney) cell cancer. He’s also had some tough personal problems. Two months before his diagnosis he went through a divorce. He would like to restore his relationship with his two teenaged daughters.

Please come onto the website on Sunday January 17, 2010 at 12 noon US Eastern Standard time and hold the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Michael Spencer’s cancer be healed, and his relationship with his daughters be healed, and that he be healthy and well in every way. "

Back to basics banking

Our neighbors decided on an unusual get together just before Christmas — our local Chinese restaurant on Elvis night.

Our seating plan offered me a situation I usually don’t find myself in – close proximity to a senior accountant — and in those situations, I usually revert to type and begin asking questions, like any good journo.

While our tubby singalike from the Midlands belted out some very good renditions of the King’s oeuvre, I decided to get serious for a moment, and take advantage of whatever knowledge he might have about the world financial crisis. During Love me Tender, I leaned over and whispered, “So what should we be doing about the banks?”

Bonus announcements
It’s a fair question to ask – and I ask it of almost everyone who might have some ideas — because in the UK, where I live, no one in charge seems to has a clue. It seems an especially pertinent question for today, when JP Morgan and other big Wall Street banks are on the verge of releasing the figures of the record bonuses they’re expected to pay to their highest fliers.

In the US, just since last April, all the major banks have reported bumper year-end results. Nevertheless, they have cut lending to businesses by $100 billion, even though getting credit moving again was the original purpose of the transatlantic bailouts. Meanwhile, bankers have reverted to engaging in the high-leverage risky practices such as subprime mortgage lending that placed the world in jeopardy.

Obama is shortly to announce his levy on banks to claw back some $70 billion of the $700 billion taxpayers spent to bail them out, and in the UK, Gordon Brown has announced a 50 per cent tax on bank bonuses. Meanwhile, the largest bailed out US banks are spending millions of the money they received from us, lobbying to kill legislation that may regulate many of the reckless practices that got them into trouble in the first place.

‘Shouldn’t we just stop some of these practices, since we now own the banks?’ I asked my neighbor.

'Well, it’s complicated,' he said. 'You have to give these people incentives to go on and make money.'

What are banks for?
Perhaps it is because I'm largely ignorant of world economics, but it doesn't seem to be the slightest bit complicated to me. It seems to me that what I’m really asking has to do with the real purpose of a bank and what its suppose to do with money, and also with the nature of the social contract.

In 1774, two years before America declared its independence, the very first Building Society was created in Birmingham, Great Britain.

A building society was, as its name suggested, an organization devoted to helping people build a house, and virtually every town in Britain had one in its name. Local people would join the society and put the money in as a pool; your savings would be loaned to one of your neighbors to build his house, and he would turn around and do the same for you. Although all of the society members, in a sense, ‘owned’ the Bulding Society, a building society was self-terminating. Once everyone in the neighborhood had a house, the society would be dissolved.

So in that sense, they were like a mutual or savings and loan, but with a self-destruct button. Those in charge at the time understood that their only purpose was to act as a community pool of money. A building society only needed to make enough money to cover its operational costs, not to make a profit.

Terminating societies continued to exist until 1980s – at which point, the banking laws in the UK were amended. Building societies were allowed to turn into banks. Most of them convinced their members to surrender their individual mutual rights in exchange for shares, and a number were swallowed up by larger banks. This was the ‘greed-is-good’ era of Margaret Thatcher, when numerous people, with their eye on a quick buck, joined building societies solely in order to gain voting rights, and subsequently pressured the other members to ‘demutualize’.

Suddenly, the emphasis was not in providing a service to members, but to generate profit for its shareholders. With that, as one study discovered, the pricing policies on demutualized societies grew less favorable for customers and more favorable to shareholders. The community cooperative had lost any semblance of its original function and turned into a pirate.

In America, largely because of the recent bailout, all the smaller community banks in America — who avoided these risky practices and more closely resemble a building society — are finding it impossible to compete, and are being swallowed up or closed down.

The problem is that modern banks have forgotten the basic reason for their existence ­ as a cooperative pool of money, fairly distributed ­ and we have lost any semblance of confidence in them because the mutual nature of the exchange has been entirely lost.

Move your money
Frustrated by the fact that Congress isn’t fixing things, publisher Ariana Huffington came up with an ingenious solution. Recently, she created a movement called Move Your Money, which urges Americans to move their money out of the large banks and into the local community banks. The idea is that if enough people move their money out of JP Morgan, Chase, Citibank, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs or Morgan Stanley, we will send a huge message to Wall Street and to the White House that we can no longer tolerate a bank that ignores the public interest. The Move Your Money website (www.moveyourmoney.org) lists all the smaller neighborhood banks that exist in your local area.

In the UK, Richard Branson and Virgin have announced their intention of setting up an alternative bank. So one of the first of the uncomplicated things we can do is move our money to smaller, less greedy banks.

Benefit of tit for tat
I was fascinated recently to see an experiment set up by the University of Leicester’s psychology department. They programmed two computers to be selfish and to engage in performing certain well-worn tasks, with no real benefit to working together.

Nevertheless, after a while, the scientists found that the computer programs began taking turns in perfect coordination. After initial uncoordinated interactions, as soon as the pair begin to coordinate efforts by chance, they began a duet of tit for tat.

Before long, they begin taking turns, and in perfect synch. The programs had worked out that by getting into coordinated turn-taking, they were both better off.

"This locks them into mutually beneficial coordinated turn-taking indefinitely," said the scientists.

Using evolutionary game theory and simulations, Professor Andrew Colman and Dr. Browning found that a similar variation of 'tit for tat' after their computer simulations evolved in at least two genetically different types.

From their work, they believe they've discovered that all living things have evolved to work better when they work together and take turns fairly.

Banks have become like the machines in the Matrix — a pointless, destructive law unto themselves. Nevertheless, they might learn something important from a couple of dumb computers.

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Mike Spencer

Help to heal his kidney cancer

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT
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Michael Spencer, aged 55, of Deland, Florida, has stage IV renal (kidney) cell cancer. He’s also had some tough personal problems. Two months before his diagnosis he went through a divorce. He would like to restore his relationship with his two teenaged daughters.

Please come onto the website on Sunday January 17, 2010 at 12 noon US Eastern Standard time and hold the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Michael Spencer’s cancer be healed, and his relationship with his daughters be healed, and that he be healthy and well in every way. "

The happiness non-formula

Happy New Year, everyone. Please accept my fondest wishes for a happy, healthy, abundant and intentional New Year.

In the UK where I live, everything slows and even shuts down for 10 days over the holiday season. So during our holiday break I had the opportunity to read an entire magazine of the London Sunday Times devoted to the study of happiness and what exactly makes for the good life.

Some of the ideas expressed in one of the articles, written by Joshua Wolf Shenk for the Atlantic, make for a good discussion, during this first week of the new year, about what it means to be happy and whether we can program ourselves — through intention or any other means — to be happy all the time, as many people believe.

Shenk’s article concerns an in-depth look at the Grant study, one of the most complex and fascinating pieces of medical and psychological research unique in modern times.

In the late 1930s, Arlie Bock, director of the health services at Harvard University at the time, backed by department-store magnate named W. T. Grant, conceived of the idea of taking the best and brightest from Harvard and studying them over time to ‘attempt to analyze the forces that have produced normal young men’.

Unlike virtually all medicine of the time, which focused on pathology, Bock wished to study the qualities of wellness, happiness and success: those x-factors that make for a happy life. Bock had big plans; from his data, he promised a blueprint for ‘easing disharmony in the world’.

Impressive study
Bock and his colleagues from an impressive array of disciplines — medicine, anthropology, psychology, psychiatry, physiology, social work — set about selecting 268 young men at Harvard as the most promising, potentially successful and well-adjusted to take part in a longitudinal study. This kind of exercise gets hold of a relatively small sampling of people and tracks their progress over a long period of time.

This is not the only piece of research like this. In 1948, in an attempt to discover the common causes of cardiovascular disease, a group of scientists at Boston University hit upon the idea of tracking its development over time among a large group of participants – in this instance, a substantial percentage of an entire town of Framingham, Massachusetts.

Nevertheless, the Grant study is perhaps the only one of its kind to study the exhaustive biography of all of its sampling (whose survivors are now in their late 80s) in order to determine how exactly the lives of this bright bunch played out.

For 70 years, the group — told they were part of a special elite — were poked and prodded in every conceivable way and every body part measured and compared, from length of ‘lip seam’ to scrotum size. Biological changes with any physical activity were painstakingly observed. Social workers, interviewing their relatives at length, uncovered such private details as when they stopped wetting the beds. Psychiatrists submitted the young men to a battery of Rorschach and other popular psychological tests of the time.

Over many years and successors after Bock finished with it, chiefly psychiatrist George Vaillant, its shepherd since 1967, the Grant study continued to maintain contact with its cohort, monitoring the course of what should have been two hundred plus success stories.

Shakespearean tragedy
In fact, the cases, in many instances, read like Shakespearean tragedy. Although a number of the group achieved extraordinary outward success — the participants included the late President John F. Kennedy, a presidential cabinet member, a newspaper editor, a bestselling author and four who ran for U. S. Senate — by age 50 a third of the men had suffered clinical mental illness. A goodly percentage became alcoholics.

Many of those considered most gifted turned out to have disastrous or even pointless lives. One young man, the son of a wealthy doctor and artistic mother, was singled out as exceptionally blessed: ‘Perhaps more than any other boy who has been in the Grant Study,’ wrote one researcher about him, ‘the following participant exemplifies the qualities of a superior personality: stability, intelligence, good judgment, health, high purpose, and ideals.’

At the age of 31, the young man grew hostile toward his parents and eventually the world. Although the study lost track of him for a time, eventually Vaillant and his colleagues discovered he had lived nomadically, dated a psychotic girlfriend, smoked a good deal of dope and dined out on a rich seam of humorous stories before dying young.

Another young man, considered one of the most ‘bubbling and effervescent’ of the group, followed a batch of odd jobs and married a string of women before finally coming out of the closet and becoming a leader in the gay rights movement. Nevertheless, despite this newfound honesty with himself, he became a heavy drinker and at 64 killed himself by drunkenly falling down his apartment building’s stairs.

Bock was shocked by how his best and brightest were doing. “They were normal when I picked them,’ he remarked when Vaillant caught up with him in the 1960s. ‘It must have been the psychiatrists who screwed them up.’

On the other hand, others who’d started out with difficult early lives rallied as time went on. One young social misfit, given to depression, found his calling as a psychiatrist in mid-life after someone was simply kind to him during one of his bouts in the hospital.

Predictions confounded
All the usual confident predictions about people’s lives are defied by this sampling and also by another study managed by Vaillant, called the Glueck cohort. This study contains the flip side of the Harvard cohort: a group of non-delinquent boys from inner-city Boston, the offspring of poor and largely foreign-born parents, who were also followed for 70 years.

In both groups, rich and poor, Valliant has noted the same themes and he is very careful about generalizing what he has observed. Money and even a good start don’t guarantee happiness or success. Good luck doesn’t guarantee happiness. A particular personality type doesn’t guarantee happiness. What appears to be the x-factor is not how much difficulty you face in your life but your response to that difficulty.

As a psychiatrist, Vaillant is particularly interested in ‘adaptations’, or defense mechanisms – how a human unconsciously responds to stress, whether outright pain, or conflict of any sort or even the unknown.

Although many of his young men began using immature adaptations (such as acting out, passive aggression or projection), as time wore on, the most successful found mature adaptations, such as humor, ways of sublimating aggression (such as sport), working out conflict constructively or altruism. Indeed, among those living longest, as they reached 50, both human and altruism became more common and immature responses more rare.

Illness, nutritional pioneer Dr. Stephen Davies once said, is simply the failure of an organism to adapt to his environment. That environment can be entirely hostile, but we remain healthy if we understand how to navigate through it with grace.

In his article, Shenk calls mature adaptations a ‘real life alchemy’, ‘a way of turning the dross of emotional crises, pain and deprivation into the gold of human connection, accomplishment and creativity’. Vaillant likens it to the grit of sand in an oyster eventually transforming into a pearl.

This idea seems to me to be profound. So much of the time in the personal development field, we suggest that we have the power to make the bad times go away permanently.

What is most important is the understanding that every tough moment is your life’s biggest pearl. That, in my view, is the key to the good life.

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Health Intention of the Week - Bert Kraan

Help to ease his prostate cancer

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Bert Kraan, 75, of Suawoude, the Netherlands, has suffered from prostate cancer since 2001. After a series of intense and focused radiation treatment, his PSA levels fell, but since 2006, they have started to rise again and in January 2009 his urologist told me that the cancer had metastasized.

Bert, a former biochemist, wished to avoid anti-testosterone treatment, and has employed a variety of alternative means to treat his cancer. Unfortunately, he has suffered from swollen kidneys (hydronephrosis) and needs to emply his bladder frequently. He now uses a bladder catheter using a mix of treatments recommended by Ty Bollinger Cancer-Step out the box} and German People Against Cancer’s Lothar Hirneise (Chemotherapy.) He also uses the diet prescribed by Johanna Budwig, plus biocurcumin and apricot kernels.

Please come onto the website on Sunday January 10, 2010 at 12 noon US Eastern Standard time and hold the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Bert Kraan be free of all cancer and to be healthy and well in every way."

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Aaron Gene Phillips

Help him heal after heart surgery

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Aaron, now 13, who lives in Phoenix, Arizona, was born with congenital heart defects. Two were treated when he was two years old with open-heart surgery. On Nov 30, 2009 another surgery was scheduled at Phoenix Children's Hospital to correct narrowing in the aorta.

Please send the following 10-minute intention for his full recovery at noon time Eastern Standard Time, on December 20,2009:

"My intention is that Aaron enjoy full recovery from his heart surgery and be healthy and well in every way."

Doing onto others: the linger effect

Every story that we’ve been told ingrains in us the idea that we were born to be selfish. Left to our own devices, without the taming influence of a social contract, we would act according to our true natures, which is to say cold-bloodedly and entirely for self-preservation.

Many biologists argue that doing ontp others is ultimately an act with selfish motives. Those instances of true nobility of action derive from some rare moral exception, which temporarily suppresses our innately selfish impulse for personal survival.

This is entirely in keeping with most of what is written about the power of intention. Most of the literature on intention or manifestation has to do with creating personal abundance: using intention to get more stuff for me.

Since the start of The Intention Experiment I have rejected the notion that intention and manifestation should be used purely for personal gain.

The altruistic power of thought
I believe that if thought is so powerful, and group thought more powerful still, then we have, in a sense, an obligation to do something more than using it to park a new BMW out front.

This was the thinking behind our small and large-scale Intention Experiments. All should be designed with some large philanthropic implication: making food more plentiful; lowering violence, cleaning up polluted water.

Nevertheless, the most remarkable thing about altruistic intention is that it has an extraordinary rebound effect. What has impressed me most about the results we’ve had in The Intention Experiment thus far is not simply the extraordinary effects we’ve had on the targets – whether seeds, plants, leaves, water or a war-torn country like Sri Lanka – but also the effects upon the participants.

In the last three studies – the Peace Intention Experiment in autumn 2008, the first Clean Water Experiment last June and the second Clean Water Experiment in September — I have surveyed the participants several months later to find out what their experiences were during the experiment and if anything in their lives had changed in any way as a result of their participation in our experiments.

Rebound effects
I have been truly astonished by the results. In all three experiments, the majority of our participants were novice intenders. Although nearly half of the participants in both experiments were experienced meditators, and most had read The Intention Experiment, the majority of PIE and CWE participants had not practiced Powering Up, the intention program I developed, until the experiment.

Nevertheless, in both experiments the experience itself provided them with a rare opportunity to experience the transformative power of group intention with an altruistic purpose.

Despite the fact that their group consisted of total strangers scattered all over the world, a third of all PIE participants and nearly a third of all the CWE participants felt an overwhelming sense of unity with the other participants. Half the PIE intenders (one-third of the CWE intenders) felt a surge of compassionate love and in both instances half the participants felt peaceful.

A third of PIE participants felt a connection with the Sri Lankans — the target of our Peace Intention Experiment — and, remarkably, half of our CWE participants felt connected to the water.

In our forum, many of our participants commented that although they were experienced meditators and used to feeling peaceful, the bliss experienced was unlike anything they’d ever experienced before.

In the Peace Experiment, approximately a third felt more peaceful and compassionate than usual and more connected with others in their lives. Nearly half were more optimistic that world peace is achievable.

With the CWE, nearly 60 per cent said their mood had profoundly changed: they were more peaceful or compassionate than usual, and felt happier and more connected with others. Nearly a third felt more optimistic that clean water in the world for all is achievable.

Long-term changes
What is most fascinating of all, however, is the long-term effect on relationships with others. Although about a quarter feel more love for their loved ones, more than a third – the largest response of all — experienced a profound shift that can only be described as an impersonal, everpresent feeling of love.

More than a third of participants in both experiments claimed they felt more love for everyone they came into contact with. Nearly 40 per cent of the PIE participants and 23 per cent of the CWEgroup said their relationships with strangers improved, with the next best improvement among friends.

These findings have prompted me to studying why people are permanently changed by altruism, and I’ve discovered a few fascinating clues.

Joshua Green and Jonathan Cohen, two psychologists formerly of Princeton University, examined the effect in the neurology of onlookers to victims of violence. They discovered something remarkable: the same network of neurons in the brain lights up when the witnesses observe the potential of harm to another as when a mother sees a photo of her baby.

That basic capacity for caring and responding to suffering extends not only to our young but to strangers and also appears to be basic to our biology.

The rewards of altruism
Other neuroscientists called Jorge Moll and Jordan Grafman at the National Institutes of Health examined what happens within the brain either when participants receive a big monetary reward for ourselves or make a large charitable donation. The researchers discovered that either donating or receiving a big windfall had the same effect in lighting up the primitive mesolimbic reward pathways in the brain that get aroused during eating or having sex.

Nevertheless, those volunteers who chose to make a donation had additional activity in the the subgenual cortex/septal portion of the brain. This portion of the brain is linked with bonding and social attachment.

Ayn Rand once wrote, “If any civilization is to survive, it is the morality of altruism that men have to reject.”

This study shows just the reverse. Giving not only feels good, but is the primary impulse – and not selfishness – that keeps us all together.

May you find permanent joy in giving this holiday season.

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Adriana Gibaut

Help her to beat cancer

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I would like to nominate my sister Adriana for the intention of the week. She was diagnosed with breast cancer about three years ago. Her type of cancer is very invasive (HER2+), and eventhough she is responding fairly well to chemotherapy and rays, about a year ago she started to have mestatases in bone an liver -this reacted well to medication and are somehow under control- but about three weeks ago, a new set of tumors were found in her brain.

Doctors are studying if only the cerebelus is affected, but they have the fear that this could be also attacking the meninges, this would be very bad, as there are only a few highly risky procedures to treat this.

This is why I would need and beg, if it´s possible to have her nominated for this week intention (Sunday Dec, 6) or as soon as possible. Results from some spinal cord puncture study will be ready next monday, and the following week she -and her doctors- should have to take a decision on what procedure to follow.

On Sunday, December 13th, please come onto the site at 5 pm GMT (noon time Eastern US) and send the following intention to Adriana:

"My intention is for Adriana Gibaut to beat the cancer she is fighting and for her body to return to its healthy state."

Take two friends before bedtime

‘Tis the season to be jolly - but only for some of us. It’s also the season where one in six of us in the West are overwhelmingly, debilitatingly depressed. In fact, so prevalent is depression that it is predicted to overtake heart disease as the number one illness of our times.

True clinical depression, like most illness these days, is considered largely our ancestor’s fault. The entire edifice of standard treatment for depression rests upon the theory that depression results from a chemical imbalance within the brain, which in many circles is considered to be largely hereditary.

A chemical imbalance
Most of the millions of people diagnosed as suffering from clinical depression are told they are low in a neurotransmitter called serotonin, which is largely responsible for mood. For decades, the medical solution has been to offer up a drug to counteract this poor genetic roll of the dice.

This view of the origin of depression mirrors that of virtually all of medicine, which maintains that blueprint of our life and health lies in our DNA, the genetic coding that supposedly holds a fixed menu of our potential for health or illness.

My heart problem is like dad’s, who had a dicky ticker; I’m likely to get breast cancer because it’s what my grandmother died of. We look upon ourselves in a sense as victims—victims of our genetic history.

The fact is ‘chemical imbalance’ theory of depression never been convincingly proven in any peer-reviewed study anywhere. Researchers comparing the cerebrospinal fluid of clinically depressed and suicidal patients have found absolutely no differences in their serotonin levels, compared with those of healthy controls.

Even when of healthy participants in medical trials have had their serotonin levels deliberately lowered, they have failed to become depressed; when depressed people have been given huge increases of serotonin their symptoms have not improved.

Indeed, the bible of the psychiatric community, The Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry, refers to the theory of serotonin deficiency as “an unconfirmed hypothesis”.

Some forward-thinking researchers are re-examining the serotonin issue — in fact the entire theory of why depression occurs — in light of work such as that which has just emerged from Northwestern University.

The genetic short straw
Joan Chiao, an assistant professor of psychology at the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern, was fascinated by the genetic roll of the dice signified by the gene (STG), which is responsible for transporting serotonin.

STG comes in two different flavors —the short and long allele — but the short allele, like its name, represents the short straw. This variation carries the major ‘on’ switch for depression; anyone with this gene who goes on to experience multiple life stresses is thought to be overwhelmingly likely to spiral into major depression.

Chiao and her colleagues are part of the new field of cultural neuroscience, which examines mental health across nations and individual social groups. One of the greatest distinctions in any culture is how someone thinks of himself — as an individual or mainly in relation to a group.

In Chiao’s study, she and her colleagues first began by differentiating the cultural values of 29 countries, including the US, the major European countries, South Africa, Eastern Europe, and also South Asia, East Asia and South America. They examined the degree to which each population was individualistic or collectivistic – that is, whether their cultures place greater emphasis on the individual or the group.

“People from highly individualistic cultures like the United States and Western Europe are more likely to value uniqueness over harmony, expression over agreement, and to define themselves as unique or different from the group,” Chiao noted. We are defined by our distinctiveness.

Social harmony
In collectivistic societies, such as those of East Asia, on the other hand, higher value is placed on social harmony rather than individuality. The culture encourages behaviors and practices that endorse interdependence and group cohesion. These people are largely defined by the social groups to which they belong.

Chiao’s team then studied the genetic makeup of all these societies. They discovered that East Asia has a hugely disproportionate number of carriers of the short allele — at least 80 per cent of the population — who are genetically susceptible to depression.

In fact, they found a powerful association between the collectivistic tendencies of the population and the prevalence of the short allele gene. The tighter knit the population, the higher percentage of the people who carried the gene for depression.

If the genetic theory of depression is right, they should have discovered correspondingly high levels of depression among these populations.

Instead, they found the opposite: among these highly susceptible populations, the actual prevalence of depression was significantly lower than that of Western Europe or America.

Buffering from the group
Chiao believes that their surprise finding has to do with a tacit or openly acknowledged expectation of social support. “Such support seems to buffer vulnerable individuals from the environmental risks or stressors that serve as triggers to depressive episodes,” she noted.

As a rough rule of thumb,” wrote Harvard political scientist Robert D. Putnam in his book Bowling Alone (Simon & Schuster, 2002), “if you belong to no groups but decide to join one, you cut your risk of dying over the next year in half.”

Make sure this season to have yourself a friendly little Christmas.

Co-creators – far away and long ago

Many people these days toss around the term ‘observer effect’ without really knowing what it is or what its full implications are.

Probably the person most responsible for examining this question was an American physicist called John Archibald Wheeler.

Wheeler, a protégé of Danish physicist Niels Bohr, was fascinated by what became known as the Copenhagen Interpretation, after the place where Bohr, and his brilliant protégé, the German physicist Werner Heisenberg, formulated the likely meaning of their extraordinary mathematical discoveries.

Bohr and Heisenberg realized that atoms are not little solar systems of billiard balls but something far more messy: a tiny cloud of probability.

As the founders of quantum theory first discovered in the early part of the twentieth century, subatomic particles like electrons or photons by themselves aren’t an actual anything yet.

Every subatomic particle is not a solid and stable thing, but instead exists in many states at once, in a state of pure potential — what is known by physicists as a ‘superposition’, or sum, of all probabilities.

Scientists only allow that an electron ‘probably’ exists when they pin it down and take a measurement, at which point those multiple states of being collapse and the electron settles down into a single state of being.

The fact that this occurs only when the particle is measured or observed suggests a staggering possibility to many scientists: that the role of the scientist himself — or in real life, the role of living consciousness — somehow is the influence on the smallest elements of life that turns the possibility of something into something real.

A new double-slit experiment
Wheeler wanted to test this with a variation of the famous double-slit experiment in quantum physics, a variation of an experiment with light first created by Thomas Young, a British physicist of the nineteenth century.

In Young’s experiment, a beam of pure light is sent through a single hole, or slit, in a piece of cardboard, then passes through a second screen with two holes before finally arriving at a third, blank screen.

In Young’s experiment, the light passing through the two holes forms a zebra pattern of alternating dark and light bands on the final blank screen. If light were simply a series of particles, two of the brightest patches would appear directly behind the two holes of the second screen – as a pattern of individual particles.

However, the brightest portion of the pattern is halfway between the two holes, caused by the combined amplitude of those waves that most interfere with each other. From this pattern, Young was the first to realize that light beaming through the two holes spreads out in overlapping waves.

A modern variation of the experiment fires off single photons through the double slit using a gadget called an interferometer. These single photons also produce zebra patterns on the screen, demonstrating that even single units of light travel as a smeared-out wave with a large sphere of influence.

Twentieth-century physicists went on to use Young’s experiment with other individual quantum particles, and held it up as proof that quantum physics has Through-the-Looking-Glass properties: quantum entities acted wavelike and travel though both slits at once.

Since you need at least two waves to create such interference patterns, the implication of the experiment is that the photon is somehow mysteriously able to travel through both slits at the same time and interfere with itself when it reunites.

Nevertheless, there is a catch to this experiment: when the experimental apparatus has a particle detector on it to discover which slit the photon went through, it changes the outcome of the experiment. Instead of being wave-like, the photon acts like a particle and is detected as definitely traveling through one of the two slits.

Rather than creating an interference pattern, it creates a definite particle pattern on the screen.

So when the particle detector is turned on, rather than a smeared out, uncongealed wave, the photon acts like a solid particle: it has come into being. At this point, it collapses to a single entity, goes through only one of the slits and enables you to track its path.

Delayed choice experiment
In 1978, when Wheeler was pondering the meaning of this experiment — which seemed to place an emphasis on whether the photons were detected or not — he wondered whether timing was important – whether it mattered at which point the photon is observed or measured.

He devised a famous thought experiment called the Delayed Choice Experiment, in which a particle detector is delayed so that the photon’s path only gets detected after it has gone through the slits.

Think of a photon which has already passed through the slits and is traveling toward the back walls. There are three possible routes for the photon: the left slit, the right slit or both slits at the same time, and at this stage, we don’t know which route it has taken.

Wheeler imagined that the apparatus includes a highly mobile detector screen, which can either be either removed at this point or left in place. If the screen is removed, two telescopes are revealed, each one trained on one of the slits. If the screen is removed, the telescopes be able to see and record a little flash of light as the photon traveled through one of the slits and so be able to detect the path of the photon through one or the other slit.

In this experiment, the observer has ‘delayed his choice’ of whether he wants to observe the path of the photon (via the telescopes) or not until after the photon has presumably made its decision to go through one slit, the other slit or both.

According to Wheeler’s ingenious mathematics, the path of the photons entirely depends upon whether they are observed or not.

Astonishingly, if we remove the screen and the telescopes record the path of the photons – even after the photon has passed through the double slits – we get a distribution pattern consistent with the kind of pattern we’d get if particles were going through one or the other of the two slits, but not both.

If the screen is up, the photons remain in a state of superposition and go through both slits.

Observation – backward in time?
The remarkable aspect of this experiment of course, is that timing is irrelevant: even after the event has occurred and the photon has gone through one or both slits, the presence or absence of the screen — that is the presence or absence of observation — determines its final outcome.

So the implications are that observation, even after the fact, determines the final outcome.

The observer entirely controls whether that which is observed comes into being – at any point in time.

In the words of Wheeler’s protégé, the famous physicist Richard Feynman, the role of the observer in quantum physics was the ‘mystery which cannot go away’.

Nevertheless Wheeler’s idea remained an intriguing feat of mathematics until 2007 when Jean-François Roch and his and his colleagues at the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan in France found a way to carry out the experiment Wheeler had imagined thirty years ago.

At its most elemental, physical matter not only isn’t an anything yet, but remains something indeterminate until our consciousness becomes involved with it. The moment we look at an electron or take a measurement, it appears that we help to determine its final state. The most fundamental relationship of all may be matter and the consciousness that observes it.

However, what is most breathtaking about Wheeler’s discoveries and the proving by Roch and his fellows is the implications about the irrelevancy of time.

As Wheeler once noted in 2006, two years before he died: “We are participators in bringing into being not only the near and here but the far away and long ago.” In his fertile imagination, he even imagined the entire universe as one giant wave in need of observation to have brought it into being.

In this instance, perhaps the observer will turn out to be God.

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Health Intention of the Week - Tamar Friedner

Send an intention to heal her pancreatic cancer

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Tamar Friedner, who is 31-year-old young woman, has recently been diagnosed with aggressive pancreatic cancer, now very advanced and progressing rapidly. Last week she started chemotherapy to reduce the extreme pain and to try to shrink the tumors. At first it looked promising, but there has apparently been a turn for the worse since.

Tamar is staying with her parents now in Milford, Massachusetts, USA. Before falling ill, she was a member of the Dancing Rabbit Ecovillagefor Sustainable Community Living -- an intentional community in rural northeastern Missouri. Here she is, Tamar working on a new building for the community, and creating a mosaic for a building project.

On Sunday, November 29th, please come onto the site at 5 pm GMT (noon time Eastern US) and send the following intention to Tamar:

"My intention is that Tamar Friedner be free of all cancer, free of all pain and healthy and well in every way.”"

Natural Selection and Natural Born Killers

Last week, my daughter had a field trip to the new Darwin Center at the Natural History Museum in London, the place where you can see real scientists at work and ‘true’ science in the making.

For me, the unveiling of this new building, and all the bicentenary hoopla about Darwin – the commemorative stamps, the re-releases of his books, the special museum piece in his honor, the television specials all featuring the kindly, long-bearded gentleman-genius – have sparked in me some rather grave second thoughts about the man and his enduring legacy.

Although all of science has a profound effect on our own definitions of our universe, the discovery that may have had the greatest and most enduring impact on our philosophical view of the world was the theory of natural selection.

Scarcity model
When putting together his ideas for what eventually was published as On the Origin of Species, Darwin was profoundly influenced by the concerns put forward by Reverend Thomas Robert Malthus about population explosion and limited natural resource, and ultimately concluded that since there wasn’t enough to go around, life must evolve through struggle.

Subsequent interpretation of Darwin’s work did most to generate a vision of man’s solitary nature, with the suggestion that in life only the toughest and most singleminded survive.

Darwin’s thoughts about randomness got a further boost in 1953, when James Watson and Charles Crick unravelled deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), the genetic coding within the nucleus of every cell. Thereafter, scientists came to believe that within the coiled double helix lay every individual’s lifelong blueprint.

Each of our cells, equipped with a full pack of genes, would live out its pre-programmed future, while we were held hostage, powerless to do anything other than to observe the drama unfolding.

As with every other kind of matter, the individual could also, in a sense, be reduced to a mathematical equation.

Consequently, for two hundred years our world view has been shaped by a scientific and philosophical story describing isolated beings competing for survival. Our paradigm for living, as largely extrapolated from Darwin’s theories, has been built upon the premise that competition is the most essential aspect of existence.

No true morality
The modern-day followers of Darwin, the so-called ‘Neo-Darwinists’, have taken this one stage further, with the more extreme view that our genes, even our ideas and morals, are engaged in competition with other gene pools and thoughts for domination and longevity.

Morality itself was an evolutionary happenstance, completely at the whim of what works best in keeping the species alive.

Shooting your classmates is not objectively wrong, but the idea has evolved to ‘appear’ wrong so that we all don’t turn on each other with a semi-automatic.

Recently I came across an extraordinary new book, entitled The Political Gene: How Darwin’s Ideas Changed Politics, by Dennis Sewall, which takes issue with the beneficial effect of Darwinism.

As Sewell notes, one person is not celebrating the Darwin double anniversary this year. That is Darrell Scott, a resident of Columbine, Colorado.

Natural selection at Columbine
Scott’s 16-year-old daughter Rachel was killed by Eric Harris and Dylan Klebolt when they sauntered through Columbine High School on April 20, 1999 (Adolf Hitler’s birthday), armed with two 20-pound propane bombs, an Intratec TEC-DC9 blowback-operated semi-automatic ‘handgun’, a Hi-point 995 Carbine semiautomatic pistol, a Savage 67-H pump-action shotgun, and a Stevens 311D double-barrel sawed off shotgun, plus assorted bombs and Molotov cocktails, opening fire on much of the student population, killing 13 of their classmates and injuring 24 others before turning the guns on themselves.

Last April, at the gathering of the 10th anniversary of Columbine massacre, Scott senior noted that on the day of the massacre, Harris was wearing a t-shirt with the words ‘Natural Selection’ emblazoned on it.

‘They made remarks on video about helping out the process of natural selection by eliminating the weak,’ noted Scott. ‘They also professed that they had evolved to a higher level than their classmates. I was amazed at the frequent reference to evolution, and that the press completely ignored that aspect of the tapes.’

Attorneys for six of the families whose children were killed at Columbine also found, among Harris’ journals and videotapes made at the time, that Harris was a great devotee of Darwinist principles and saw his actions purely as a natural extension of evolution and survival of the fittest.

My killer camp
Before it was closed down, ‘Natural Selection Army’ was a popular social networking chatroom considered a training ground for the disaffected like Harris and Klebolt. One of its frequent guests was Pekka-Eric Auvinen, an 18-year-old Finnish student, and self- described ‘social Darwinist’ (his You-Tube street name was ‘Natural Selector89’).

In 2007, Auvinen went on to shoot and kill his head teacher, while she was kneeling in front of him, and seven other students at his senior school in Tuusula, Finland, again before turning the gun on himself.

His rationale? ‘Stupid, weak-minded people are reproducing . . . faster than the intelligent, strongminded’, he wrote.

Many of the survivors noted that Auvinen was discriminatory about whom he chose to kill and whom he’d set free, deliberately attempting to root out those he deemed ‘unfit’.

The Harris and Auvinen cases appear the rantings of the lunatic sociopath until you ponder the fact that every aspect of our society reflects the essentially competitive nature of the universe and life as equivalent to a game of chess.

Every modern recipe in our lives has been drawn from this notion of being as individual and solitary struggle, with every-man-for-himself competition an inherent part of the business of living.

We have built our entire Western economic model on the notion that competition in a free-market economy is essential to drive excellence and prosperity.

In our relationships, we extol our inherent right to individual happiness and expression above all else, as our divorce statistics testify. We educate our young by encouraging them to compete and excel over their peers.

The currency of most modern two-cars-in-every-garage neighborhoods, as I have found, is comparison and one-ups-manship.

Darwin actually predicted (and appeared to favor) the idea that at some point in the future Europeans and Americans would exterminate those deemed to be ‘savages’ and that the higher races would prevail. Violent competition in nature, in his view, inevitably produces winners and losers. The winners have a right to winner take all, because the race as a whole will benefit from it.

As our Darwinian economic model and much of our social contract lays in ruins, we have to question, as Sewell puts it, “the more sinister aspects of the world-view that has come to be called ‘Darwinism”.

While we live our lives in competition, every last one of us has a piece of Eric Harris inside of him.

Intention of the Week

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Health Intention of the Week - Myriam Dragicevic
Help her to heal and be cancer free

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Myriam Dragicevic is 48, and lives in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada and has recently been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. She is
married and has a 7-year-old daughter. She is going through treatment and to her sister's surprise and happiness, is open to receiving blessings, prayers and
alternative energetic healings.

On Sunday, November 22, please come onto the site at 5 pm GMT (noon time Eastern US) and send the following intention to Myriam:

"My intention is for Myriam to be cancer free and to heal completely and to live a long life with family and friends."

Intention of the Week

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Financial Intention of the Week - Ilse Carpay
Help her to receive funding for her new business

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Ilse Carpay, 39, lives in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. She and her business partner are writing a business plan at the moment to set up their own business, a photographer's agency, based in Amsterdam.

As she writes: "We have both worked in this field before, and we would like to be our own bosses. We have five photographers at the moment and we are aiming at 10 in total. The five current ones have absolute trust and belief in us. But without a little bit of financial support it will be very tough to succeed."

Ilse says she needs 'micro credit’' - or funding from the bank. Let's set an intention to help her get that financial boost she needs to make a start.

Isle is no stranger to intention. She says she recently survived cancer, and believes that her recovery had to do with all her friends and family from around the world joining in to sending out positive thoughts before her surgery to contain the tumor so it didn’t spread to her organs.

On Sunday, November 15, please come onto the site at 5 pm GMT (noon time Eastern US) and send the following intention to Ilse:

"My intention is for Ilse and her partner to receive the financial help they need from the bank for their new photography business."

Bad vibes and good viruses

Last night we ran our first teleseminar on Intention, which was fantastically well-attended by people all over the world. If you missed it, we’ll be running another one soon on developing intuition, so stay tuned.

One of the questions I repeatedly receive during workshops such as last night’s is how to protect yourself from the collective negative effect and intention of a group. Why do certain groups fairly irradiate ‘bad vibes’ and others joyful ones? Why is it that when you attend certain events you are elated and yet others leave you feeling utter depressed? How can you prevent yourself from becoming ‘infected’ by it, most people ask? What kind of psychic protection do you need?

Recently I found a fascinating answer to this, in the work of Professor Sigal Barsade, who teaches management at the Wharton Business School at the University of Pennsylvania.

Transformed office
As a young graduate student, Sigal went to work one day and noticed that something fundamentally had changed – something that she couldn’t quite put her finger on. There were no new employees, no change of management and no change of scenery, but she might have strayed into the wrong office, so different was the atmosphere from usual.

The general mood, usually so edgy and stressful, had completely transformed. Those who’d stared at her and barely acknowledged her before now looked up from their work and smiled. Workers who’d usually spent the entirety of every day glued to their computer screens took breaks to chat around the coffee machine.

For the whole of that blissful week, the group with whom she regularly worked was more relaxed and sociable than she’d ever thought them capable of. For the first time, she began to look forward to going to work.

The following week, the veil that seemed to have been lifted abruptly dropped. The collective mood was back to normal – tense, testy and sullen.

Barsade was confused by it all. Nothing was different about the week, and yet the whole of the office had been profoundly affected – for the worst. When Sigal cast around for an explanation, the only difference – the only variable to which she could attribute this change – was the return of a petulant co-worker from vacation.

The negative virus
Even though the woman didn’t work with Barsade’s group, so palpable was her complaining and snappish temperament that it had engulfed everyone who worked at the company, like a virus raging through the office and infecting everyone in its path.

Barsade, who was in the midst of her master degree in business at the time, began to think of this employee’s moodiness as a contagion. Perhaps it was, she thought, that people were walking ‘mood inductors’.

She decided to test what she began calling ‘the ripple effect’ of emotion by devising an ingenious experiment with students at the Business School. In her experiment, she created four groups of students, who were to act as managers assigning a pay bonus among their employees, with each manager acting as an advocate on behalf of his own team member.

The mood regulator
Unbeknownst to the students, Barsade had placed a cuckoo in the nest of each group – a drama student who was asked to act out a different amount of pleasantness and energy in each group.

The results were striking. Even though ‘Rick’ had offered identical participation in every group, each one was profoundly affected by his moods and, what’s more, the members of each group responded in kind.

When Rick was upbeat, so was that particular group; when he exuded pessimism and negativity, his bad mood infected every other member of the group and they were less likely to cooperate with each other. When he was calm and happy, the group was more likely to bond and work with each other productively.

The effect was not only insidious, but also completely unconscious. Even when the separate groups filled out questionnaires, all attributed their own effectiveness within the group to other factors — never to collective mood.

Rick’s effect on each group also extended to all encounters he had with group members on campus in subsequent months. Those with whom he’d acted positively greeted him warmly; those in groups in which he’d been the group pessimist continued to greet him hostilely or with chilly silence.

Positive is more contagious
Barsade made another fascinating discovery, however: Rick’s positive moods were more socially contagious than his bad moods, and were more likely to act like a giant virus, overwhelming the group. In fact, when Rick was in his positive state, the group actually gave him more money than he’d asked for.

Barsade concluded that both kinds of emotion – positive and negative – are contagious, but that positive emotions are the more powerful and stimulate others to be more cooperative.

Emotions are virulent viruses. Almost immediately our emotions infect others; elements in our brains and bodies immediately begin to copy theirs. (If you don’t believe this, try to resist smiling when someone — even a newscaster on TV — smiles at you.)

During a recent study in which participants listened to a speech read by an actor, alternately using happy, unhappy or neutral inflections of speech, when the participants were asked to rate their own emotional states, in every instance, their own emotions matched those of the speaker while he was reading the speech.

Furthermore, when they were asked provide their attitude toward the speaker, they were least fond of the speaker with the unhappy voice.

An ugly mood
I was witness to the power of emotional contagion at a conference we once ran in London. During question time, a member of the audience began to heckle one of our speakers, who had made a number of fascinating, but controversial points.

Almost immediately the mood turned very ugly, and the entire audience took it in turns to verbally attack the speaker. The collective mood, formerly so positive, had been thoroughly hijacked.

These were early days in my speaking career, and as master of ceremonies, I wasn’t sure how to restore audience confidence or order.

I picked up the microphone, went back to the initial questioner’s question, politely but firmly defended our speaker from attacks and went back to address the unfair methodology of the heckler.

Then, to try to dispel the icy silence, the speaker and I jointly told a joke, giving everyone our widest smiles. Order and confidence were immediately restored, the mood had lifted and at the break, the heckler approached our speaker to apologize.

Perhaps the best antidote to negativity is not protection at all, but examining it from the perspective of relationship. Rather than reacting to negativity, simply start your own virus — a contagion of good will.

The Power of the Group: beyond mob rule

Because I am interested in the power of the group and the power of group thought, lately I’ve been investigating why and under what conditions this occasionally goes horribly wrong. Why do large groups of seemingly civilized, kindly and moral people perpetrate acts of inhumanity?

Under what mindset did many ordinary German people agree to be, as Daniel Goldhagen put it, ‘Hitler’s willing executioners’? What can be conditions under which inhabitants of the Balkans feel justified in carrying out systematic rape and the destruction of entire communities? Is there a mob psychology that takes over, prompting an otherwise loving person take up a machete and use it to slaughter women and children in Africa?

What, Joan Didion famously asked, makes Iago evil? Is evil inherent in the person or inherent in the social context?

During the 1961 trial of Adolph Eichmann. the American historian Hannah Arendt concluded that far from being a dysfunctional psychopath, Eichmann was, to all intents and purposes, shockingly ordinary.

Evil, she posited, is utterly banal, capable of being committed not by the crazed and lunatic but by the unremarkable: even the most civilized among us — the happily-married, two-kids-and-two-cars regularly-churchgoing neighbor — can turn into a sadistic crazy when given social support and a legitimatizing ideology, such as Nazism.

Shocking findings
One of the people fascinated by Arendt’s then explosive thesis was Yale University social psychologist named Stanley Milgram who created one of the most famous experiments examining this question. He’d created a study in which an actor, posing as the ‘Learner’ in an experiment, was subjected to memory tests. If he got any answers wrong, the participants in the experiment — the Teachers — were told to deliver shocks of increasing severity to the participant.

In actual fact, the Learner did not receive real shocks, nevertheless he responded convincingly as though he had. The extraordinary finding of his experiment was that every last one of the 40 Teachers had been willing to administer shocks of 300 volts and two-thirds prepared to order the full voltage of 450-volt shocks, even though the Learner was heard to scream out in agony, complain of a bad heart condition and repeatedly demand to be released from the study.

Milgram had designed the study so that his participants were both repeatedly ‘ordered’ to continue meting out ‘punishment’ and absolved of any blame for what happened. The experimenter would take ultimate responsibility if the Learner got ill or died.

Milgram concluded that Arendt was right: ordinary people would placed obedience to authority (‘I was just following orders’) above their own moral values under certain circumstances.

Mob rule
Perhaps the most famous study of in relation to the dynamics of groups and ‘mob rule’ was carried out in 1971, the Stanford Prison Experiment. Stanford University psychologist Philip Zimbardo created a mock prison in which a group of nice, middle-class university students, especially screened to be the most psychologically stable of all those who’d volunteered, were assigned the roles of guards or prisoners, with Zimbardo taking in the role of prison supervisor.

The Palo Alto police were cued to ‘arrest’ the students and fingerprint them, and they were given humiliating clothing to wear, referred to only by number and made to follow endless arbitrary orders and punishments in order to mimic the dehumanizing aspects of prison.

The experiment quickly got out hand. The student guards became more and more sadistic, refusing to allow the prisoners to urinate or defecate, or to empty the sanitation bucket, forcing them to sleep on concrete, placing them in a closet deemed to be ‘solitary confinement’, and finally subjecting them to degrading and pornographic violence. What’s more, the prisoner students accepted their humiliating treatment. At least one third of the guards were judged to have exhibited true ‘sadistic’ tendencies; many of the prisoners were left emotionally traumatized by the experience.

Although it had been planned for two weeks, the study had to be halted after six days.

Zimbardo’s conclusion was that his prison experiment had all the hallmarks of mob rule: that when people assemble into groups and are given power over other groups, they cannot resist behaving sadistically.

These two pivotal studies have been cited in all the decades since in psychology classes as proof positive that groups have an automatic Lord-of-the-Flies effect, causing people to shed their moral judgment, even their humanity.

The BBC Experiment
In 2002, Alexander Haslam, a professor of social psychology at Britain’s University of Exeter and Stephen Reicher, social psychologist at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, wished to revisit these ideas and recreate the Stanford University experiment.

Funded and filmed by the British Broadcasting Company (and eventually shown on TV as The Experiment) the two researchers created an elaborate prison, and again randomly divided a group of men into two groups as either prisoners or guards.

Nevertheless, this time, unlike Milgram or Zimbardo, the experimenters did not in any way attempt to influence the participants’ actions. So crucially they did not provide the defining ideology – or justification for cruelty.

Over eight days, the experimenters were witness to stunning developments. Although the prisoners, the ones with less power and privilege, were initially demoralized, over time the group dynamics shifted.

As the prisoners developed a sense of shared identity, they began to function effectively as a group and also increasingly enjoyed improved morale and mental well-being.

Shared identity
Shared identity ultimately led to improved effectiveness and even health, with low levels of cortisol – the hormone pumped by the body in times of stress. As time wore on, the prisoners became stronger, happier and empowered.

The guards, on the other hand, who had not bonded as a group, became increasingly dispirited and powerless, exhibiting high levels of cortisol.

Eventually the prisoners staged a breakout and the authority of the guards collapsed. After the coup, everyone — guards and prisoners — spontaneously agreed to form a system of greater equality: what they termed a ‘self-governing, self-disciplining commune’.

The experiment would have ended on a happy note, but the idyll didn’t last. After the group began doubting their ability to enforce the commune, the organization of the group soon began to fall apart.

Tyranny re-established
At this point, some members of the guards and prisoners began to plan a new ‘coup’ in which they would take over, re-establish a line between prisoners and guards, and establish more authoritarian order. They even requested black berets and black sunglasses to reinforce their images of a you-talkin-to-me bad ass.

Those in the commune didn’t fight back, but were in such disarray that they, too, were willing to agree to a system of tyranny again. At this point, fearing another Stanford experiment situation, Haslem and Reicher ended the experiment.

Haslem and Reicher are very clear about what they observed.

Nevertheless, tyranny was not inherent once people formed a group; it was displayed because of the failure of the groups, first the failure of the guards to form a collective bond and then the failure of the entire group to create the equalitarian commune they’d imagined.

While the prisoners had successfully fought off some relatively minor inequalities at the start of the experiment, by the end they were willing to embrace and even support tyranny because they did not enforce their collective utopian ideal.

Although the researchers believe tyranny is a product of group processes, not individual pathology, they disagree about the nature of it.

“From our standpoint, people do not lose their minds in groups, do not helplessly succumb to the requirements of their roles and do not automatically abuse collective power. Instead they identify with groups only when it makes sense to do so.’

The individual inside the group
Groups — our neighborhoods and towns, our religious affiliations and political parties, even our countries, in every sense — determine and justify what we do.

Cohesive groups are extraordinarily strengthening — indeed necessary for our survival.

Even as a beleaguered group, the BBC prisoners remained robustly immune to treatment by the guards — so long as they could connect with others in the same boat. In fact, the more they were oppressed as a group, the stronger they became.

The bottom line is that every group creates a collective culture — whether of hate or love — but every individual in the group helps to create that culture and has a responsibility.

What is important is establishing and maintaining the we’re-all-in-this-together cohesion of the group, but then taking a good long look at its values to ensure that it does not stand for oppression of anyone.

Because you are a Republican does not give you the right to behave badly to a Democrat. Because you are Israeli does not absolve you from humane treatment of a Palestinian — and vice versa.

And that’s where your individual responsibility takes over.

Confessions of a Not-so-Hockey Mom

For the last two weeks I have been busy reacquainting myself with math, as I help our 12-year-old daughter prepare to take an entrance test for her senior school. (In the UK where I live, there is no guarantee of decent local schooling, no matter where you live. Children have to pass tests to get into the better schools – state or private.)

I’m not only surprised at noting, from the perspective as an adult, how utterly extraneous most of what she’s having to learn has proved to be in terms of useful life skills for me, and also now early complicated abstract concepts are now being shovelled in.

The need to parade a familiarity with all this fairly useless knowledge has got me thinking a good deal about the main thing that we are teaching our children about the social contract when we force them to compete with each other for places in schools – or indeed anywhere else.

The playground battlefield
I was a guest speaker on a teleseminar called Women on the Edge of Evolution the other week, which had been prompted by a comment by the Dalai Lama that the future of the world will be led by Western women.

My initial response on this teleseminar was incredulity. In my experience, Western women are learning to as competitive and cutthroat as men and their battlefield is essentially the playground.

As the mother of two children, I find more competition between mothers than I do in most boardrooms. In many instances, the social exchange is tainted with a distinctly mean-spirited or competitive edge, laden with a large sprinkling of schadenfreude.

Which school has your child gotten in to? How many children do you have? What’s your kid’s university grade point average? Where, in other words, do you/your spouse/your offspring fit on the social ladder?

Social competition
I often remain blissfully tone deaf to social competition, largely because my foreignness — an American abroad — means I never quite catch the full nuance of the distinctly underwater means of communication unique to Britain.

Once, when I was invited over for tea by the mother of my then 5-year-old eldest daughter’s best friend, she spent a good deal of time inquiring after what we did on our weekends. I painstakingly catalogued the usual list of jolly inner-city leisure activities — trips to museums, afternoons at the park.

When I relayed the conversation to my British husband later, he patiently decoded for me that this exercise was meant to pinpoint where we stood on the social strata by ascertaining whether or not we owned a second home in the country. (We don’t.)

But other times the competitive edge is anything but coded. Many years ago, while I was still grieving after a miscarriage, one acquaintance with four children turned to me and noted matter of factly, ‘So this is the second one, isn’t it?’

And one of my better friends, also pregnant, who’d initially called to offer condolences, ended up explaining why she’d now opted to take a hormone: ‘I want to make sure the same thing doesn’t happen to me.’

Scarcity complex
Perhaps the greatest rending of the social fabric has to do with our scarcity mentality when it comes to our children. Any success for your children is somehow perceived as a lessening of my child’s chances.

At a party a few years ago, we were asked about our eldest daughter’s college plans, and mentioned that her first choice was one of the top universities in England. I noticed an awkward silence and covert glances being exchanged, as if to underscore that this was a reach that surely exceeded her grasp.

That’s the university she’s attending now, but I can count only a very few mothers who could, with an honest heart, extend their congratulations. A place for your child means one less place for mine.

And now, as most of my 12-year-old daughter’s friends prepare to take entrance tests for a variety of schools, the school gates are awash with scuttlebutt about which are the better or worse schools and therefore which are the better and smarter children – information that eventually filters through to the children themselves.

Competition on the playing fields
Inevitably, this kind of competitive academic edge begins to creep into the social relations of our children. Last year, a 12-year old girl misrepresented her position in netball (England’s version of female basketball) to take over the place usually inhabited by my daughter – one of her best friends.

As I attempted to raise this tactfully with her mother, she shrugged her shoulders. ‘Well, that’s life, isn’t it?’

All’s fair in love and war.

The effect of all this competition is extraordinarily corrosive. A recent study showed that the most depressed group of people in the British population are teenaged girls; more than one-third feel high anxiety from the need to compete for beauty, slimness and grades.

A loss of empathy
What now seems to be lost in modern femininity is that quality we’re supposed to embody: empathy. In our creation of a competitive society, we appear to have lost that special ability to tune into another – to move beyond the sense of self and take the other’s perspective.

Psychologist Tania Singer of University of Zurich studies empathy and which portions of the brain are activated by a variety of feelings. Recently Singer conducted an intriguing study examining neural activity through brain scanning of 32 volunteers after they’d participated in a simple psychological game called Prisoner’s dilemma.

The game is meant to test our response to fairness, because it allows its players either to cooperate for an equal portion of money or to double-cross their partners for a larger individual payout.

Unbeknownst to the participants, Singer had engaged two actors as the opposite players. In the game, all the volunteers played the first round, and gave their partners money.

The actors responded either by returning high or low amounts of money – so one played fairly and the other unfairly. After the game, the participants were placed inside an fMRI scanner while they watched their two partners in turn each receive a painful shock through electrodes attached to the hands.

Punishing results
Both men and women showed neural evidence of empathy toward the fair players. However, men not only had a reduced empathetic response when they saw unfair players getting shocks; but they also experienced increased activation in the part of the brain connected with rewards.

They were actually enjoying the experience of revenge and favoring physical punishment of those who’d got the better of them.

For the men, empathy occurred only in the context of tit for tat: ‘I’ll scatch your back. . .‘

But for the women, they innately wanted to turn the other cheek. Their neural hardwiring for empathy lit up, even for the people who’d cheated them.

But if this is the case — if women may have more of a developed sense of empathy — in my view our societal creations we have created now wrings much of the drop of human kindness out of us.

Until we recover that ability, we will not be able to evolve. When we can all stop being pit bulls with lipstick we might get somewhere.

More Than Just Spoonbending

Perhaps the only downside about all the publicity having to do with the The Lost Symbol is the renewed attack on consciousness research as unworthy of serious discussion.

All of the skeptics and their websites are brimming with renewed fervor, and in the UK, where I live, all the scientists and science writers have dismissed out of hand any ideas about a science behind the power of thought.

In a recent documentary on The Lost Symbol, the slightest mention of noetic science was conspicuously absent.

The view seems to be that while the material about Freemasonry may be based on fact, noetic science is more akin to science fiction — and more properly belongs on a show featuring an illusionist like Derren Brown.

The heart of the difference
This body of science and indeed all the implications about the power of thought go well beyond spoon-bending tricks.

This central idea, that consciousness affects matter, lies at the very heart of an irreconcilable difference between the world view offered by classical physics – the science of the big, visible world – and that of quantum physics – the science of the world’s most diminutive components.

These discoveries offer convincing evidence that all matter in the universe exists in a web of connection and constant influence, which often overrides many of the laws of the universe that we used to believe held ultimate sovereignty.

Information transfers
The significance of these findings extends far beyond a validation of extrasensory power or parapsychology. They threaten to demolish the entire edifice of present-day science.

Frontier research into the nature of human consciousness has upended everything that we have hitherto considered scientific certainty about our world.

For more than 30 years many of the scientists I write about — physicists like Fritz Albert-Popp and Hal Puthoff, psychologists like Gary Schwartz and Dean Radin, biologists like the late Jacques Benveniste — have been amassing unimpeachable evidence in experiments that has stretched credulity.

At least 40 top scientists in academic centres of research around the world have demonstrated that an information transfer constantly carries on between living things, and that thought forms are simply another aspect of transmitted energy.

Hundreds of others have offered plausible theories embracing even the most counter-intuitive effects, such as time-displaced influence, as now consistent with the laws of physics.

Our definition of the physical universe as a collection of isolated objects, our definition of ourselves as just another of those objects, and even our most basic understanding of time and space, will have to be recast.

Using the power of thought
Ideas about the power of thought are no longer the ruminations of a few eccentric individuals. They now underpin many well-accepted disciplines in every reach of life, from orthodox and alternative medicine to competitive sport. Any modern coach of a competitive sport routinely offers training in some form of mental rehearsal, and often it is touted as the decisive element separating the elite sportsperson from the second-division player.

Medical scientists often speak of the ‘placebo effect’ as an annoying impediment to the proof of the efficacy of a chemical agent. It is time that we understood and made full use of the power of the placebo. Repeatedly, the mind has proved to be a far more powerful healer than the greatest of breakthrough drugs.

This knowledge may give us back a sense of individual and collective power, which has been wrested from us, largely by the current worldview espoused by modern science, which portrays an indifferent universe populated by things that are separate and unengaged.

Indeed, an understanding of the power of conscious thought may also bring science closer to religion by offering scientific proof of the intuitive understanding, held by most of us, that to be alive is to be far more than an assemblage of chemicals and electrical signalling.

Medicine, healing, education, even our interaction with our technology, would benefit from a greater comprehension of the mind’s inextricable involvement in its world. If we begin to grasp the remarkable power of human consciousness, we will advance our understanding of ourselves as human beings in all our complexity.

The art of the impossible
Frontier science is the art of inquiring about the impossible. All of our major achievements in history have resulted from asking an outrageous question. What if stones fall from the sky? What if giant metal objects could overcome gravity? What if there is no end of the earth to sail off?

All of the discoveries about the power of thought and remote influence have similarly proceeded from asking a seemingly absurd question: what if our thoughts could affect the things around us?

True science always begins with an unpopular question, even if there is no prospect of an immediate answer – even if the answer threatens to overturn every last one of our cherished beliefs. The scientists engaged in consciousness research must constantly put forward unpopular questions about the nature of the mind and the extent of its reach.

In our group Intention Experiments, we have asked the most impossible question of all: what if a group thought could heal a remote target?

It is a little like asking, what if a thought could heal the world?

It is an outlandish question, but the most important part of scientific investigation is just the simple willingness to ask the question.

Mainstream science — and indeed the press — have grown ever more fundamentalist, dominated by a few highly vocal scientists and science writers who believe that our scientific story has largely been written.

Nevertheless, a small body of resistance carries on in defiance of this restricted view. With every unorthodox question asked, with every unlikely answer, frontier scientists such as those featured in my books remake our world. May they and their ilk light our way.

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Financial Intention of the Week - Marcelle Costanza
Help her to get the job of her dreams

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"I am 51 years old and living in New Jersey, and have always been the bread winner in my marriage," says Marcelle. She’s had several home-based businesses, which were doing well until "the bottom dropped out of the economy," she says. After taking a low-level job at the university near home, she left because she could no longer afford to pay for medical insurance.

Recently, she saw a posting about a job that is tailor-made for her, which includes graphic designs and much creativity. It will also enable her to pay back money she had to borrow to keep making mortgage payments. She’s applied for the job, and is asking all her friends and our community to join with send intentions, visualizing her in the job.

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT on Sunday, October 18th, follow the Intention of the Week instructions on the front page and send the following intention:

My intention is for Marcelle Costanza to be working at the university job she has applied for – the job of her dreams.

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Intention of the Week - Susie Christofi
Help her beat cancer

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Susie Christofi, 33, who lives in Boise, Idaho in the US, has stage IV BAC lung cancer with a pleural effusion (fluid in the lungs) and a great deal of pain. This is her third year battling the disease with traditional medicine as well as nutritional and alternative therapies. The pleural effusion is recent, says a loved one, Laura, her sister-in-law.

We are looking for the fluid to be reabsorbed by the body, for tumors to shrink as cancerous cells return to normalcy. Thank you so much for your help.

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT on Sunday, October 18th, follow the Intention of the Week instructions on the front page and send the following intention:

My intention is for Susie Christofi’s cancer cells to return to normal, her lung fluid to be reabsorbed and for her to be healthy and well in every way.

Results of the Clean Water Experiment:Of glowing light and alchemy

Dear friends,

  This week I returned from speaking at Omega and the New York Open Center (both wonderful groups, I must say), and waiting for me was a complete analysis of the results of the two Clean Water Experiments we ran on June 13 and September 19 of this year with psychologist Dr. Gary Schwartz of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health at the University of Arizona. 

The results are so breathtaking that I must share them with you here.

Mark Boccuzzi, our chief lab technician who actually runs the experiments, prepared four Petri dishes of ordinary tap water, labelled ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’.  He then took images of them with the Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, developed by Russian physicist Konstantin Korotkov. 

 Photographing the light from water

The GDV makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer to photograph the biophotons emissions, or light, emanating from living things.

Ordinarily, a living organism will dribble out the faintest pulse of photons, perceptible only to the most sensitive equipment in conditions of utter pitch black. As Korotkov has realized, a better way to capture this light is to stir up photons by ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal.

Korotkov’s equipment blends several techniques: photography, measurements of light intensity and computerized pattern recognition.

Like people, liquids glow

In the case of liquids, the GDV machine examines the emission activity on the surface of the liquid — that is, its ability to retain important information from other molecules.

The emission activity of liquids depends upon the presence of clusters of hydrogen atoms with a special ability to bond.  It is this special property, Korotkov believes, that gives water its unique capacity to record and retain information. 

Tests on liquids

Korotkov and his team have carried out a great deal of research on a great variety of biological liquids, showing that the GDV equipment is highly sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical contents of liquids — subtle changes that don’t show up in ordinary chemical analyses.

His equipment can detect tiny differences in between the glow of natural and synthetic essential oils with the identical chemical composition; between blood samples of healthy people and those patients suffering from cancer or heart disease; and even between oils extracted by different methods. He has also found statistically significant changes in water even when homeopathic remedies diluted 30 times were added to it.

Healing changes water

Since 2001 Dr. Korotkov has investigated the remote mental influence of a healer on water samples. Numerous experiments or his have demonstrated that mental influence results in statistically significant changes of the electrophotonic quality (the ‘glow’) of water.  

In our experiment, we took this one stage further.  We wanted to see if we could transform the glow of tap water to become more like that of mineral water. 

Mineral water and tap water have very different looking GDV images. 

GDV Images of mineral and tap water

Typically, bottled water (the image on the right) generates a larger inner ‘water drop’, or glowing area, and a much smaller and smoother outer ‘aura’ area than tap water (the image on the left).

The Clean Water Experiment protocol

In both our June and September experiments, after taking the GDV images, Mark Boccuzzi made an ordinary photograph of each dish and emailed the images to me.  These water samples were then allowed to sit for five days in a secured location until the date of the experiment. 

During that time, the water became stagnant; when Mark took GDV images shortly the experiments were carried out, both the controls and the targets showed increased ‘glowing’ around the water drop.  At this stage, both images look identical.

Just before we were due to start June experiment, I took four pieces of paper with A, B, C, D written on them, and asked my youngest daughter Anya to select one randomly.  My husband Bryan randomly chose the target for our September experiment.

 

In both instances, dish ‘C’ was chosen.  The scientists were blinded to our target until after the experiment – which meant they didn’t know which dish we’d targeted. We uploaded dish C on our website, then asked our community, again from some 60 countries around the world, to send an intention to make the energy footprint of the sample water look more like the footprint of bottle water.  During the intention, we showed our audience the photos above, and asked them to imagine the water’s footprint changing.

Here are the impressive results:

JUNE 13, 2009

The first photos show the first GDV photos, when the water was first poured.  The second set of photos shows what the energy footprint looks like after the water is stagnated.  The third set is after intention.  All the photos on the right are of our target Petri dish. The ones on the left represent one of the three controls of each experiment.

As you can see, in the first two sets of photos, the images are very similar, particularly after stagnation.  Nevertheless, after we sent intention to the targets, the target photos (the final photos on the right) show larger center water drops and smoother auras — much like the energy footprint of bottled water. The controls have smaller center water drops and more jagged outer auras.

CONTROLS                       TARGET

 

FIRST PHOTOS

First Photos

AFTER STAGNATING

After Stagnating

AFTER INTENTION

After Intention

A near identical situation occurred in our September 19 experiment.  Once again, the GDV images looked very similar at first and also after stagnation.  After intention, however, the water droplet in the center of our target dish (bottom photo on right) appears rounded, and the aura smoother:

SEPTEMBER 19, 2009

CONTROLS TARGET

 

FIRST PHOTOS

First Photos

AFTER STAGNATING

After Stagnating

 AFTER INTENTION

After Intention

As Dr. Gary Schwartz concludes in his analysis, the results of both the June and September global intention Experiments show increased roundness and smoother auras, which are consistent with the ‘predicted effects of intention on reversing stagnation in water.

Furthermore, the fact that we were able to replicate our findings over the two experiments supports the use of the GVD technique as a means of measuring the energetic effects of stagnation and the use of intentions to create cleaner water.

So what does this all mean, in plain English?  It means that we were apparently able to change the energy footprint of water to something more consistent with the energy of bottled water.

It is a first step toward using intention to clean up water.

It represents nothing less than a kind of alchemy.  Dan Brown would be proud.

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Intention of the Week - Victor Hugo Osorio
Help him let go of past emotional problems, and replace the tumours in his bladder with clean and healthy tissue.

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Victor Osorio, age 64, from Stockton, CA, has worked in a job that required him to use strong, industrial-strength chemicals. His son is convinced that this, combined with childhood trauma he's been holding onto, is responsible for his bladder cancer. Now he is facing surgery to remove his bladder.

The good news is the cancer has not spread beyond it. However the tumor, which has been recurring on and off for the past 21 years, has now imbedded so deep there is no available option other than the surgery. The lining of the bladder doesn't repair like other organs, so when tumors have been removed before, it has stayed raw and irritated which has caused the tumors to return.

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT on Sunday, October 11th, follow the Intention of the Week instructions on the front page and send the following intention:

"My intention is that Victor Osorio will release his emotional past, and the tumor will be replaced with clean healthy tissue.”

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Group Intention: A Field effect

Last week, two studies that caught my eye seemed to answer fairly basic questions about the nature of the social group and the power of the social contract, and why all this related to the power of group intention.

The study, recently published in Cancer Prevention journal, represented some groundbreaking collaboration between cancer specialists at the University of Chicago and behaviorist psychologist Martha McClintock, founder of the Institute for Mind and Biology at the University of Chicago. McClintock had been fascinated by the effect of social isolation on disease and aging.

Isolated mice
As usual, the study involved mice (and I will state here my continual objections to animal research like this – this study could have been done on humans). The Chicago scientists gathered together infant mice that were genetically predisposed to breast cancer and identical in every way, and divided them into one of two groups. One was then raised within a group of mice, and the others were raised on their own.

They then studied genetic expression in the mouse mammary tumors over time. Before long, the Chicago scientists discovered that the mice that had been isolated grew far larger tumors. They were also found to have developed a disrupted stress-hormone response and behaviour indicative of chronic stress.

The researchers then wished to examine the precise biological consequences of the stressful environment. When they studied the gene expression in the mouse mammary tissue over time, they found altered genetic expression levels of metabolic pathway genes in the isolated mice. The environment had altered the way in which their genes were ‘turned on’.

Suzanne Conzen, associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago, and lead author, was stunned by the results. “I doubted there would be a difference in the growth of the tumors in such a strong model of genetically inherited cancer simply based on chronic stress in their environments, so I was surprised to see a clear, measurable difference both in the mammary gland tumor growth and interestingly in accompanying behavior and stress hormone levels.”

Conzen and her colleagues concluded with a statement that would have been heretical to most biologists and geneticists – namely that ‘the social environment, and a social animal’s response to the environment’ can alter gene expression – that is, turn them on or off – in a wide variety of tissues in the body, including the brain.

In the case of the mice, they permanently stressed by being on their own and the stress of isolation altered their genes and made them ill.

Group rowing
I then came upon another extraordinary study, this time of Oxford University rowers. In this instance, a group of anthropologists from the University of Oxford’s Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology asked a group of 12 rowers to work out in a virtual boat in a gym used for normal training. In each of four tests they were to row continuously for 45 minutes, first as members of one of two teams of six, and then in separate sessions as individuals unobserved by the other members of the team.

Exercise has long known to increase a person’s ability to tolerate pain. So after each session, the scientists measured the rowers’ pain thresholds by measuring how long they could tolerate an inflated blood pressure cuff on the arm. Although the rowers evidenced increased pain tolerance after every one of the sessions, they had significantly larger tolerance to pain after the group training, as compared with the effect of exercising individually.

Professor Robin Dunbar, head of the Institute of Cognitive and Evolutionary Anthropology at Oxford, concluded that although all physical activity results in a release of endorphins – the feel-good chemical - the synchrony of the shared physical activity appeared to create a ‘ramped up’ endorphin release, which may have something to do with communal bonding.

So when we do things in groups, we feel a rush of ‘we’re-all-in-this-together’ elation that actually allows us to resist difficulties, including pain.

Said Dr. Emma Cohen, the lead author in the study, which was recently published in the UK’s Royal Society journal Biology Letters, a growing body of evidence suggests that ‘synchronized, coordinated physical activity may be responsible’ for this phenomenon.

The power in numbers
The real takeaway message here is the extraordinary power of the group. These two studies support the central thesis of The Intention Experiment: that group intention creates, in essence, a sacred circle that magnifies the effect.

To my mind, these two studies together answer some vital questions about the power of group intention to ‘ramp up’ the effect of individual thought. If the mouse studies can be applied to other species, including humans (and of course there is no evidence they can be) the lifeblood of most living things is a social group.

Indeed, it appears necessary for survival. Although the mice contained a genetic ‘blueprint’ for mammary cancer, the only factor that turned on the genetic expression of it was social isolation. For the mice raised with other mice, the social group created a ‘field’ that proved protective of cancer.

In the case of the rowers, the group created a ‘field’ that magnified individual efforts and overrode individual limitations. Within the field, the whole was greater than the sum of its parts.

This is why we feel something extraordinarily akin to magic in our intention circles; we glimpse the essential bond that is our birthright.

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Intention of the Week - John Terry Livingston
Help to heal his prostate cancer

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John Terry Livingston, 71, of Cottonwood, Arizona, has early stage prostate cancer.

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT on Sunday, October 4th, follow the Intention of the Week instructions on the front page and send the following intention:

"My intention is that John Terry Livingston be free of all cancer and be healthy and well in every way.”

Do you have a financial challenge at the moment? Be part of our Financial Intention of the week. Send your name, age, location (town/country), details of your circumstance and your photo to: cs@lynnemctaggart.com

The Lost Symbol and the New Celebrity

I’ve just returned home from the September 30 Los Angeles opening of the Living Matrix film, and what a fabulous, glitzy, Los Angeles event (or ‘ta-daaaa’, as my LA hairdresser put it) it was!

The Dan Brown Effect has certainly hit LA. Held in the lush Egyptian theatre, across from the famous Grauman’s Chinese Theater, where the stars leave their footprints immortalized in concrete, the premiere began by parading all the stars of the Living Matrix movie, including me, along a red carpet, as the press’s flash cameras popped and the video cameras rolled.

I’ll feature a short video of the razzle-dazzle on these pages as soon as we get them back from the filmmakers.

If you haven’t seen the Living Matrix (www.thelivingmatrixmovie.com), it is a wonderful documentary about the science and art of energy healing.

Intention goes mainstream
Those of us in the movie may have been treated as celebrities, but the biggest celebrity of all that night was the celebration of a new paradigm, the unfolding of a new idea: the power of thought to change not only health care, but the world.

Such is the reach of Dan Brown’s popular fiction that these radical ideas – heretofore marginalized as New Age – are now being featured all over the popular press. While I was there, I was interviewed for a special NBC Dateline show (to be aired October 15), which will examine the facts behind Dan Brown’s book, including ‘noetic’ science and the Intention Experiment — and explore just how much his imagined scientist, Katherine Solomon was based on fact. News about my book even made it into Entertainment Weekly, one of the biggest entertainment magazines in America.

The power of intention has finally landed smack dab in the center of the mainstream.

During the evening a sell-out audience of 600 screened the movie, and then I joined IONS president Dr. Marilyn Schlitz, Dr. Eric Pearl, the Reconnective healer, Dr. Deborah Rozman, a chief executive of HeartMath, Peter Fraser, a professor of acupuncture, and the film’s two producers, Harry Massey and Greg Becker, in a panel chaired by well-known author and PR guru Arielle Ford of Spiritual Cinema Circle.

We discussed all the evidence about the power of thought as the essential ingredient of healing. For me, most interesting part of intention is the unknown: the exploration of exactly how much power thoughts have to heal. At the end of the panel discussion, I decided to illustrate this with a short demonstration.

A group experiment at the Egyptian
My plan was to ask the audience to participate in the kind of informal group Intention Experiment I run during my workshops and every Sunday for our Intention of the Week.

I asked for a volunteer with a health challenge. ‘Paul’, one of the audience members who’d been diagnosed with had prostate cancer, immediately raised his hand.

We all held hands to connect as a single unit while a group in the front row circled around Paul, our intention ‘target’, placing their hands on his shoulders. By the time we sent him intention to be free of cancer, we had turned into a kind of superorganism – one giant perfect thought.

It was extraordinarily powerful to witness. Paul appeared a very private and quiet man, but during the short focused intention, tears rolled down his cheeks. Many members of the audience also began to weep. When it was over, a number of people approached me to say they’d felt something extraordinary in the room that still lingered on in them. I asked Paul to write me to let me know if he experiences any change.

I emphasized that these kinds of group meetings are an ongoing experiment for me. I don’t pretend to be a healer, or to guarantee any effect, but I’m witness to so many instances of extraordinary physical transformation with group intention that I continue to marvel at its power and reach.

What is the X-factor of the group, I keep asking myself?

Just before boarding my Virgin flight back to the UK yesterday, I bought a copy of Scientific American near the gate. When I sat down to read, I was thunderstruck by the lead story, which seemed to be a message from the universe containing the answer.

The article was called ‘The Social Cure’, which concerned the work of a number of social scientists at the UK’s Exeter University. Although it had always been assumed that membership in a large number of groups was detrimental to health, particularly because it overcomplicates our lives, the evidence shows just the reverse.

The more groups one belonged to, the healthier one was – particularly if one had strong relationships within them. The scientists concluded: “Group life and a sense of social identity have a profound influence on our general health and well-being.”

This was even the case in prisons or with members of ethnic minorities who were the victims of racism. So long as they could connect with other beleaguered members of their minority, they remained robustly immune to the effects of prejudice.

“As a rough rule of thumb,” wrote Harvard political scientist Robert D. Putnam in his book Bowling Alone (Simon & Schuster, 2002), “if you belong to no groups but decide to join one, you cut your risk of dying over the next year in half.”

A group intention, even at a red-carpet Hollywood event, reminds us of the essential nature of the social contract – that our sense of belonging and being loved within a group is one of our most potent healers. At the moment, broke and with its identity in crisis, California is suffering from something close to a complete abandonment of the social code. That evening, with Paul, I like to think that we all had a reminder of just how we could get it back.

Intention of the Week

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Intention of the Week - Annette Sanita
Help improve her finances and help to keep her daughter in school

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We are running financial intentions of the week for people with financial challenges.

Annette Sanita, who is 49 years old, lives in Norwich, New York. She is a widow of seven years now and has a daughter attending her second year at New York University. She lives in the poorest county in the state. “Jobs are far and few between here,” she writes. “I do own a house, but have fallen behind in the taxes due to lack of work. I would like to relocate, New York is just too expensive for me. . . .I know this, but I cannot sell my house at the present time due to its condition. I am not asking for a lot, just to be able to make a living for myself and to enable my daughter to continue her education.”

Please come onto our website at 5 pm GMT on Sunday, September 27, follow the Intention of the Week instructions on the front page and send the following intention:

“My intention is for Annette Sanita to find a well-paying job, sell her house, move to a better location and amply afford her daughter’s education.”

Do you have a financial challenge at the moment? Be part of our Financial Intention of the week. Send your name, age, location (town/country), details of your circumstance and your photo to: cs@lynnemctaggart.com

The Lost Symbol: a group intention experiment

As I’m reading The Lost Symbol, I’m fascinated that Brown has made one of the central themes of the book both the power of thought to create the world, and the extraordinary and unifying nature of mass thought.

Katherine Solomon, one of the main protagonists, is a scientist who carries out consciousness research. Solomon is particularly interested in the power of thought – or intention, as it’s usually referred to — to affect the world.

“However, what really fascinates her is the power of the group. “We have scientifically proven that the power of human thought grows exponentially with the number of minds that share that thought, ” she says.

“This is the inherent power of prayer groups, healing circles, singing in unison, and worshipping en masse. The idea of universal consciousness is no ethereal New Age concept. It’s a hard-core scientific reality. . .”

Ecstatic oneness
In our experiment with our Clean Water experiment last Saturday, we had many reports of ecstatic experiences – a sense of oneness with the group and even with the sample of water.

As always, I’m fascinated by this experience and how each of us, in our separate computers dotted all over the world, can simply come on the website and feel a palpable sense of connection with other people sharing an experience thousands of miles away.

Here’s how some of our participants felt last Saturday.

Bernadette says she became aware of “numerous intentions towards this spot — all in synchonicity, the presence of multiple minds, yet with one focus (or thought form). For a few moments towards the end of the session, it felt like I was in the water itself —or at least became intensely aware of the water - and that it was filled with light.”

Dawn says she could feel the presence of other participants and felt my ‘powering up’ [the process I recommend to use to get highly focused] was assisted by such a collection of wise soul! At times, it almost seemed like the water in the picture was changing before my eyes.”

Although this was Terri Bennett’s first intention experiment, she says, “The energy and connection I felt was intense and beautiful. I truly believe that this type of focused, co-creative intention can change the world!”

It was also Kathy’s first time. “I also felt that my meditative state was assisted by a force beyond me, I have never had this feeling before. Several minutes into the intention I also felt a connection with the water. This was my first experience with something that felt so intense and so different from anything I've ever experienced before.”

Even though she was an experienced ‘intender’, this somehow felt different: “I've been using intention in my daily life so was quite surprised at the change between that and what took place today. As it got closer to the time, I felt my meditation deepening & changing from what I am familiar with — a pleasant sensation. . . . Before the end, I "saw" the water changing from dark-ringed chaotic structures into clear, shining, geometric shapes...it was an incredible feeling and experience.”

Karen Krugel adds: “I felt a strong power of united focus. . . It was very tangible for me. Also, connected with the water element, there was a strong feeling of peace.

“Something deep within,” she adds, “is touched by having been a part of this experiment. . .it's as if I experienced myself as greater & bigger than when I am doing something by myself!”

John Davis: Wow!” wrote John Davis. “This was the first major intention experiment that I was able to participate in directly by being online at the time. In others, I was just able to send intention to the website while at church (at Mass, so I had ‘help’). I got the book, learned the power-up techniques. . . . I was able to focus on the sample and could visualize the energy coalescing into a nice, clean sphere as in the sample picture. I could almost see the transformation of the water!”

Many people wrote in that they were still feeling the effects hours after the event. Lorreli says she “felt a very good feeling sensation throughout my entire body. it was though my entire body was being energized. I STILL FEEL IT!”

The power of eight
So, what is ‘it’ — this feeling of oneness everyone claims to be feeling?

It is, what I like to call the ‘power of eight’. When I have taken my intention experiments on the road, and asked groups of complete strangers to send healing intention for each other in small groups of a eight or more in my workshops, we’ve witnessed, quite literally overnight, that people’s lifelong illnesses have started to clear.

One woman who had suffered a migraine every day had her first ‘clear’ day after being intended for. Another who was a chronic insomniac had her first full night’s sleep after one of the sessions.

Perhaps the most impressive instance was a woman who had lost sight in one of her eyes; the following day she told us that 80 per cent of her sight had been restored.

Merging
Does the group magnify the effect – or just create a kind of merging so that our individual boundaries finally disappear?

In much of the research that I am doing at the moment, I find that a basic drive for cooperation and partnership, even sacrifice, rather than selfishness and naked survival, appears to be intrinsic to the biological makeup of all living things.

Deep connection, rather than competition, is the quality most essential to human nature: we were never meant to live a life of isolation and self-serving survival. Human beings need partnership just to survive; we experience the greatest stress and and the most serious illnesses when we are isolated from others and from a sense of connection.

The greatest healer is just reminding our self of that fact.

Pur group Intention Experiments afford us a rare glimpse of those moments of unity — if just for 10 minutes. They remind us who we were are – who we were really meant to be.

The Key to the Lost Symbol: the Power of Intention

Every so often my life takes such a fantastical turn that I am overwhelmed by the feeling that I am actually in the midst of a lucid dream, and that at any moment awakening will hand me back my ordinary world.

I had that feeling yesterday when I got an email from my editor informing me that me, my book The Intention Experiment, my website: www.theintentionexperiment.com and a good deal of my research were named, explained and used as a background source of a major plotline in Dan Brown’s new book.

I spent last night skimming the entire text of The Lost Symbol. For those of you who haven’t read it yet, the book centers around the recovery of kidnapped head of the Smithsonian Peter Solomon by Brown’s long-standing protagonist, Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, and Solomon’s sister, Katherine.

Solomon is a ‘noetic scientist’, a 50-year-old black-haired woman who has written two popular books about the new science of consciousness and the bridge between science and spirituality, which ‘established her as a leader in this obscure field’.

Presently she does mind-over-matter research and is particularly interested in the power of group minds to change the physical world.

At certain points, the story began to sound strangely familiar. . . In the Cube, a secret laboratory in the basement of the Smithsonian Institute, filled with all sorts of state-of-the-art gadgetry, Katherine carries out her cutting-edge research — virtually all of which represent a composite of the personalities or science  that have been the subject of my books or actual experiments.

Her sidekick is a ‘meta-analyst’ or computer number cruncher called Trish Dunne, which will tickle Brenda Dunne of the PEAR research (also mentioned in the book). Brown also pays homage to the Institute of Noetic Sciences, which will put a smile on the face of Marilyn Schlitz, its president and a real-live noetic scientist.

Much of The Lost Symbol concerns the link between modern physics and ancient wisdom. The ‘big idea’ in Dan Brown’s book is that science is only now providing evidence that ancient traditions have always espoused: that thought has a tangible power, enabling human beings to be creators of their own world.

In The Lost Symbol, Brown very graciously quoted me, mentioned my book by name and even gave out my website address:

“The shocking discovery, it seemed, paralleled the ancient spiritual belief in a ‘cosmic consciousness’—a vast coalescing of human intention that was actually capable of interacting with physical matter. Recently, studies in mass meditation and prayer had produced similar results in Random Event Generators, fueling the claim that human consciousness, as Noetic author Lynne McTaggart described it, was a substance outside the confines of the body . . . a highly ordered energy capable of changing the physical world. Katherine had been fascinated by McTaggart’s book The Intention Experiment, and her global, Web-based study—theintentionexperiment.com—aimed at discovering how human intention could affect the world.”

Brown makes it clear at the outside in a page entitled ‘FACT’, that “All rituals, science, artwork and monuments in this novel are real.”
Nevertheless, a few of the more traditional scientists or science writers are already taking a swing at Brown for his impossible inventions and so-called junk science.

Although I cannot speak for many of the other elements in the book — Freemasonry, ancient symbols, alchemy or hidden keys — virtually all of his comments about physics, consciousness research, mind-over-matter experiments and intention are based on fact – and indeed are enumerated in detail in either The Field or The Intention Experiment.

Here is a quick guide to the science behind The Lost Symbol:

Katherine’s lab uses random event generators. These electronic tosses of the coin were famously the equipment used in 25 years of consciousness research by Robert Jahn and Brenda Dunne’s at Princeton’s PEAR lab (The Field, chapter 6).

Her lab also uses CCD cameras that have photographed a faith healer’s energy pouring from his hands. Dr. Gary Schwartz, a psychologist at the University of Arizona, and frequent partner in our Intention Experiments, has a CCD camera that photographs biophoton emissions from living things. He has photographed light emanating from the dominant hands of healers while sending healing (The Intention Experiment, chapter 2).

Katherine’s lab is electromagnetically sealed – so much so that human thought can’t penetrate it. Possibly. In most cases, thoughts traverse anything (hence why we can run an Intention Experiment from Sydney, Australia to affect seeds in Tucson, Arizona). However, Stanford University physicist William Tiller has experimented with magnetically-shielded rooms, which tend to block the effectiveness of trained healers ((The Intention Experiment, chapter 2).

REGs dotted all over the world recorded an effect on September 11, 2001. Former Princeton PEAR researcher Dr. Roger Nelson’s Global Consciousness Project has shown an association between major catastrophic global events and changes in REG machine output (The Field, chapter 11).

Prayer groups have healed people and also have affected REG machines. Not all prayer studies have been successful, but that, in my view, has a good deal to do with poor study design. Nevertheless, many dozens of prayer and healing studies have shown positive results (The Intention Experiment, chapter 6). Dr. Nelson’s Global Consciousness Project has tracked measurable changes in REG machines after many global prayer events.

The CIA ran remote viewing programs that bordered on ancient magic. They did indeed. These programs, run  by  Stanford Research Institute’s then directors, physicists Hal Puthoff and Russell Targ, conclusively demonstrated that even novices can see things beyond the reach of visual sense (The Field, chapter 8).

Katherine’s mind-over-matter experiments have affected:

the growth rate of plants. University of Arizona psychologist Gary Schwartz and I ran six such experiments, The Germination Experiments, and presented them before the Society for Scientific Exploration in June 2008).

the direction fish swim. Psychologist William Braud, then of the Mind Science foundation, ran such experiments (The Field, chapter 7).

chemical reactions in one’s own body. Thousands of studies of biofeedback and studies on intentionality on living systems by scientists such as Marilyn Schlitz show such an effect (The Intention Experiment, chapter 9).

‘I have witnessed people transform cancer cells into healthy cells simply by thinking about them, ‘ says Katherine. One such experiment was run by Leonard Laskow by researcher Glen Rein (The Intention Experiment, chapter 10).

Katherine carries out thought experiments on water, showing that she can change the design of the crystals, depending on whether she uses a positive or negative thought. These, of course, refer to the work of Dr. Masaru Emoto, author of The Memory of Water, who proposes that sending thoughts into water changes their crystalline patterns. Psychologist Dean Radin of IONS successfully replicated his work under controlled conditions (The Intention Experiment, chapter 12).

Particles are affected by the observer. This is a fundamental principle of quantum physics: observing a subatomic particle turns that potential something into something real.

As Brown quotes me: “‘Living consciousness somehow is the influence that turns the possibility of something into something real. The most essential ingredient in creating our universe is the consciousness that observes it.’”

“We have scientifically proven,” says Katherine, “that the power of human thought grows exponentially with the number of minds that share that thought.” From the 19 studies I’ve facilitated for the Intention Experiment, and the innumerable informal small groups of healing intention I’ve run in my workshops and on my website, it seems that a small number might be just as powerful as a large number. To my mind, what seems to enhance the power of intention is a group – of any size.

“Intention was a learned skill,” writes Brown. “Like meditation, harnessing the true power of ‘thought’ required practice. . . . And throughout history, there had been those few who had become true masters.”

When writing The Intention Experiment, I interviewed dozens of ‘masters of intentions’ – Qigong masters, Buddhist monks, master healers – and all of them discussed particular techniques they learned and practiced to carry out intention. In our web experiments, we’ve had the largest effects with experienced intenders. Experience in focusing thought and carrying out intention seems to count most of all (The Intention Experiment, chapter 5).

“To manifest an intention requires laserlike focus, a full sensory visualization and a profound belief.” These and other techniques are spelled out in my Powering Up program in The Intention Experiment, chapter 13.

Whatever you think of Dan Brown’s books — and I’m finding The Lost Symbol loads of breathlessly page-turning fun — using the world’s bestselling book as a platform to introduce the idea of the power of thought will help to promote consciousness research — and the many scientists who risk careers and reputations in the name of it —  to an entirely new audience,

In the book, as Katherine admits, her particular strand of science is not widely known. But when her story comes out, says the New York Times’ Janet Maslin when reviewing The Lost Symbol, noetic science could get ‘the kind of public relations bump that Brown gave to the Holy Grail.’

This isn’t the first time my work has inspired  fiction. In my 20s, as a young investigator reporter, I had broke several babyselling rings by posing as a pregnant unwed mother and then a prospective adoptive parent.

The resulting book The Baby Brokers was optioned for a television movie by Ron Samuels’ production company. The plan was for his wife, Lynda ‘Wonder Woman’ Carter, to play a young reporter based on me.

For months I had to endure comparisons to superheroines, and dumb jokes about bullet-deflecting bracelets and oversized busts. By the time ‘Born to Be Sold’ hit the small screen, Lynda Carter had been made a social worker, and any resemblance to my book — including the point of it — had been lost.

This Katherine Solomon is different. She’s a girl after my own heart.

‘Within a matter of years,” she says, “modern man will be forced to accept what is now unthinkable: our minds can generate energy capable of transforming physical matter. . . Particles react to our thoughts . . . which means our thoughts have the power to change the world.”

Well, I, for one, am still working on that. But even still, this could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Intention of the Week

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Intention of the Week - Patrick Reid
Help him keep his home

 

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At that time, please come together on the site and send intention again to help Patrick keep his house....

This is the first of our Financial Intentions of the Week. Patrick Reid, who is 53, was injured at work a year ago, and had to go on workers compensation. "This killed my savings," he says, "and I had to refinance my home at a very high (8 per cent) interest rate."

"I have been back at work since November but have been unable to keep up with the mortgage payments. I am currently heading for foreclosure and it’s up to the bank to let me remain in the home I’ve lived in for thirty years."

‘‘I have applied for a mortgage modification and it's currently under review. If approved, it would mean everything to me and to the people who depend on me for a home. I can afford to stay in my home if the rate is lowered and the past due amount is placed to the end of the loan."

‘I know a lot of people are in my situation and I’m not special, but other people who could not afford to live anywhere else are tenants of mine, and they would become homeless as well."

"Thank you all so much, having hope is very comforting after a long time living with none."

Come onto the site on Sunday, September 13, at 5 pm GMT and send the following intention for 10 minutes:

“My intention is for Patrick Reid’s mortgage modification to be approved, for the rate to be lowered, for him and his tenants to remain in his home and for him to flourish financially. “

Do you have a financial challenge at the moment? Be part of our Financial Intention of the week. Send your name, age, location (town/country), details of your circumstance and your photo to: cs@livingthefield.com

The uncoolest guy in the room

On this sad anniversary of the twin towers, I’ve been thinking about how different people on earth see things differently. I’ve been reading of the work of psychologist Richard E. Nisbett, author of The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerns See Things Differently and Why (Free Press, 2003).

Nisbett’s life work powerfully demonstrates that those of us in the West (by which he means Europeans and North Americans) see the world and think very differently that people in Eastern Asia, which includes the Chinese, and all those historically influenced by it.

We Westerners see the world as a big collection of individual things jostling around in empty space. We judge things only in relationship to themselves - their properties and the categories to which they belong.

We understand a labrador by observing its behavior and then logically deduce that it belongs to a category encompassing all creatures which bark and wag their tails, to which we assign a category called ‘dogs’. Where a labrador lives, who or what else affected by labrador behavior, the labrador’s relationship to the earth and sky — all of this, to our minds, is beside the point to the reductive categorizing label.

Life as a field
Eastern Asians, on the other hand, learn to understand things only in relation to other things. They see life only in relationship within a field of forces. They understand matter in the universe, not as discrete objects but as protean — continuous and interpenetrating. Confucius would be right at home with Niels Bohr and quantum physics.

An East Asian is brought up with such a strong sense of connection to others that he can only understand himself in terms of his relation to the whole, whether that be his family, his neighborhood, his culture, the Tao or even his sense of consciousness.

Because Easterners define their world so differently, they have learned to see it with a different set of eyes.

Nesbitt and his team at the department of Psychology at the University of Michigan have demonstrated the stark differences between Eastern and Western perception with a fascinating series of studies. Nesbitt, working with a colleague at Hoakkaido University in Japan, gathered together two groups of students at the two universities and showed them 20-second videos of underwater scenes.

After viewing the film twice, each participant was asked to report what he saw. The Americans invariably began describing the scene with the objects in the center – the fish. To the Japanese, the context, the field itself, was most important: the color of the water, the plants undulating in the current, the ocean floor. In total the Japanese made 65 per cent more observations about the field than did Americans and twice as many relationships between objects.

They were even more likely to see emotions in the fish than were their Western counterparts.

A different set of eyes
Fascinated by this, Nesbitt and his graduate student Hanna Fay Chua wished to study if Easterners and Westerners actually take in their surroundings in a different way. They designed a batch of photographs, each with a single object in the foreground – an airplane, or a tiger, say — against a complex background — the sky or the woods.

The researchers then monitored the eye movements of Americans and Chinese participants while they viewed the photographs.

When viewing the same scene two cultures actually saw something quite different. The Americans quickly fixated on a central object far more than the Chinese and also looked at it more quickly.

The Chinese, on the other hand, had far more rapid intermittent eye movement than the Americans, flitting from one point in the background after another. The Chinese had culturally learned to attend to the whole far more than the Westerners.

These cultural differences are particularly evident in the way members of the two cultures represent themselves in society. When the two groups of students were asked to take a photo of another student, the Japanese would always photograph the entire scene, with the whole person as relatively small against the entire background, whereas Americans would photograph the person in closeup.

When asked to describe themselves, North Americans will stress their individual personality traits, exaggerate their uniqueness and prefer to talk about what they regard as most distinctive about themselves and their possessions.

Indeed, in one intriguing study, when American and Korean students were given the choice of different colored pens to keep as a gift, the Americans chose the rarest colors, whereas the Koreans chose the most common.

One wanted to be the coolest man in the room; the other wanted to be the most invisible. One wanted to be most separate, the other the most embraced.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2009-09-07

Intention of the Week

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Intention of the Week - Isabella Marie Richardson
Help to ease her ADD

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT
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At that time, please come together on the site and send intention again to heal this tiny baby....

We’re sending intention again to Isabella Richardson, who is six months old (born Feb 8 of this year), the surviving twin, who is still in intensive care at the Sacred Heart Hospital in Spokane, Washington. Her last surgery was to reattach her intestines. She’s had pneumonia and since the summer, seizures and is very ill. Please join her grandmother, who wrote on her behalf, come onto this website and send her the following intention this Sunday:

Join us on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com) at 5 pm GMT and hold the following loving intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is for Isabella Richardson to be healed of all infection, for her lungs and intestines to be healed and for her to be strong, healthy and well in every way."

Please also include your comments below:

Sun-baked highs

I’m just back from two weeks of restful vacation in Croatia with my family. On holiday I try to make a point of reading great books I’ve never got round to reading, and this time, one of my choices was Jack Kerouac’s roman à clef On the Road, the fictionalized account of his freewheeling days traversing America with his Beat buddies.

It was a book I’d always meant to read, particularly as my first book editor was Joyce Johnson. As a 21 year old, Joyce (then Glassman) was Kerouac’s girlfriend and happened to be with him the night of the publication of this now legendary book, which transformed him into a celebrity virtually overnight and firmly planted the Beats into the America psychic landscape.

I’d been one of her young authors publishing my second book when she published her own version of that period, Minor Characters, which told the story of those days from point of view of the Beat’s girlfriends, who were, as she puts it, the people on the bus who were there to fill up the seats.

Although I’d admired the extraordinary skill of her workmanship, the central concerns of the Beats hadn’t really resonated with me, a child of the late Sixties – until I read On the Road and finally understood what it was these young people had been looking for.

The overwhelming quest for transcendence through any means to hand – drugs, drink, girls, the road – got me thinking about our human need for the beatific and whether it is in fact biological.

The human antenna
British researcher Serena Roney-Dougal has gathered together some of the most compelling research into the biological means by we occasionally tune into the boundless.

According to Roney-Dougal, it all has to do with our pineal gland. This gland is a cone-shaped pea that sits on the roof of the third ventricle of the brain, directly behind the root of the nose, floating in a small lake of cerebrospinal fluid. Because it lies in the centre of the brain, neurosurgeons and radiologists have found it a useful landmark for brain surgery.

René Descartes is often quoted as claiming that the pineal gland is the seat of the soul — a unique meeting point between body and soul. After Descartes, however, the gland was consigned to the neurological dustbin, regarded by the scientific community as an evolutionary leftover, the appendix of the brain.

Then, in the 1950s, Julius Axelrod, an American pharmacologist, neuroscientist and eventual Nobel prizewinner, went on to discover the importance of this gland as our body’s biological clock. Although its full function is still poorly understood, in some scientific quarters, it is thought that, rather than being simply another endocrine gland, the pineal may be the ultimate master switch in the brain, even controlling the pituitary.

Master clock
In all higher vertebrates, including humans, the pineal gland secretes melatonin, produced from serotonin and tryptamine. Melatonin acts as a kind of master clock, regulating our sleep/wake cycle and retarding the ageing process. The late Bruno Tarquini, head of Internal Medicine at the University of Florence, fascinated by the prospect that human beings are connected to earth’s and other planetary rhythms, discovered something extraordinary – that melatonin is being produced not only from the sun’s light but also its geomagnetic activity.

According to recent neurochemical research, the pineal gland also produces the ‘neuromodulator’ chemicals—–called beta-carbolines. Beta-carbolines are both monoamine-oxidase (MAO) inhibitors and serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which means that they prevent the breakdown of serotonin by inhibiting its uptake into the brain’s synapses, akin to the action of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) like Prozac.

Some evidence also suggests that the pineal can also manufacture a hallucinogenic substance called 5-methoxydimethyltryptamine (5-methoxy-DMT) from melatonin. What might be the result is a pooling of these amines into the synapses of the brain, causing reactions that are similar to drug-induced hallucinations.

The current view is that neuromodulators need 5-methoxy-DMT and DMT in order to work and that, by blocking MAO, the pineal gland regulates and increases the concentration of serotonin. This regulatory function of blocking one chemical and promoting another is thought to be the catalyst for dreaming.

Natural highs
Several facts suggest that the production of serotonin and melatonin may be centrally involved in psychic phenomena. First, many hallucinogenic substances are chemical sisters to those made by the pineal gland. Yage, or ayahausca, a ceremonial drink made by some Amazon tribes to produce psychic effects for healing, clairvoyance and precognition, is produced from native vines (Banisteriopsis caapi) that are chemically nearly equivalent to the 5-methoxy-DMT in humans.

Roney-Dougal has postulated that, when the pineal gland is stimulated from geomagnetic activity, caused by solar flares or other solar geomagnetic activity, it produces chemicals that are similar to these plant hallucinogens, which help to alter consciousness and allow us to ‘enter The Field’.

This accords with other literature on melatonin and serotonin, altered levels of which have also been associated with psychosis and psychedelic drugs. Furthermore, if these chemicals are responsible for dreaming, it is also known that psychic experiences most readily occur in dream-like states.

Enzyme involved
So, how do geomagnetism and the earth’s energies affect these brain chemicals? Researchers have found that electromagnetic and geomagnetic fields strongly affect the production and activity of the enzyme hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT). It is this enzyme that is centrally involved in the production of melatonin and possibly 5-methoxy-DMT.

A number of studies have shown that changing the magnetic field can produce changes in this enzyme’s activity. Studies in animals have also shown that any strong change in the ambient magnetic field—whether increased or decreased—will inhibit production of HIOMT.

Other research shows that serotonin N-acetyltransferase, the enzyme involved in the production of melatonin, is strongly affected by electromagnetic fields.

If all this is the case, says Roney-Dougal, any strong change in the earth’s ambient magnetic field would produce a rush of natural hallucinogens in our bodies, enabling us to be more psychically receptive.

It’s interesting to ponder whether Jack Kerouac’s greatest moments of insight weren’t caused by marijuana, transcendent sex, hangovers, or days of driving, but perhaps the utterly capricious activity of the sun.

Twitter Weekly Updates for 2009-08-10

  • Teenage girls are the most depressed group in UK. One-third are overwhelmed by the drive for A*s and size zero. We must end this iinsanity. #

Results of the Clean Water Experiment

I’m just off the phone with Dr. Gary Schwartz, with some exciting news about our June 13 Clean Water Intention Experiment.

As you may recall, this was our first attempt to clean up polluted water. We decided to start a very subtle measure: water’s ‘energetic footprint’, as measured by Russian physicist Dr. Konstantin Korotkov’s Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which uses sophisticated technology to capture the tiny pulse of photons emitted by all living things by stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal.

The GDV machine also can record the ‘energy footprint’ of liquids.
Korotkov and his team have carried out a great deal of pilot research on a great variety of biological liquids, showing that the GDV equipment is highly sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical contents of liquids — subtle changes that don’t show up in ordinary chemical analyses.

The GDV machine examines the emission activity on the surface of the liquid — that is, its ability to retain important information from other molecules.

Dr. Schwartz, director of the University of Arizona’s Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health, and his team, including the excellent lab technician Mark Boccuzzi, have been photographing these energetic footprints of water.

There are extremely clear differences between the photographs of tap water and those of bottled mineral water. Tap water has a more diffuse image (like the sun under a lot of cloud cover), while mineral water has a strikingly clear image, like an intense circle of light.

Careful preparations
Before the experiment, Mark prepared four Petri dishes with tap water samples, and labeled them ‘A’, ‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’. Once again, Mark and the rest of the scientific team would remain ignorant of which sample we chose.

He then had to photograph the images of the Petri dishes with their labels, plus take images of energetic footprints of all four with his GDV technology.

This is truly an international experiment, run with a lab and scientific team in Arizona, orchestrated by me and my team in London, UK, with our wonderful CopperStrings web team in India, who have donated their time to our project.

Because of the large time difference (12 hours) between the lab and the web team, who must upload the images on our website, Mark had to prepare the samples five days before the experiment, in order to send us the photos in time.

The date before the experiment, I asked my youngest daughter to choose one of four pieces of paper, which contained A, B, C and D, and once she’d selected, we told our CopperStrings team which one to show on our site.

On the day of the experiment, our participants who’d registered beforehand, logged in and were given instructions by the use pages that automatically flipped over at the appropriate times.

Participants from every continent
We had registered participants from 79 countries and every continent, including people from numerous countries in Africa, the Middle East, Central America, and the Far East. Nevertheless, the largest group (more than half) were from the US, followed by Canada, the UK, the Netherlands, South Africa, Australia, Italy, Spain and Germany.

Our participants were shown photos of both the tap water and mineral water energetic footprints, to see the difference. When the experiment began, the Petri dish we’d chosen was revealed.

Our participants were asked to send an intention for the energetic footprint of the tap water to more closely resemble that of the mineral water.

Changed water
Afterward, Dr. Schwartz and Mark again took GDV images of all four Petri dishes. After they’d examined and compared all of them with the images from mineral water, they found that one photo more closely resembled that of the bottled water.

At that point, I unblinded the study; the dish we’d chosen indeed looked more closely like the mineral water than any of the others.

Nevertheless, such a study is meaningless on its own, so we decided to try to replicate it later that month, at a workshop I was running for some 75 people at the ISSSEEM conference in Boulder, Colorado.

We ran an identical experiment in every regard but one – the four tap water samples were left in the Petri dishes for just a few days, not the five days as we’d done previously.

This time, when Mark and Gary examined this results, they did not see a significant difference in the photographs.

Many possible scenarios
So even though we got results the first time, we failed to replicate them. This could mean one of a number of possibilities:

• The first experiment was a fluke
• The second experiment was a fluke
• To get a result we need to leave the water in the dishes for five days, as we did the first time
• Leaving the water in the dishes for five days enabled bacteria to grow. The presence of bacteria – rather than our intention — changed the images

Until we repeat the study, we cannot say for certain that we had a robust effect. Hence why Dr. Schwartz would like to wait before publishing the photographs.

So we’re running the experiment again on September 19.

If you were unable to join in last time, here’s your opportunity to make history. This is the first of a series of experiments we will be running this autumn with a team of scientists to test various methods of cleaning up polluted water. We will be attempting to mutate bacteria, change pH and alter the energetics of the water.

This experiment will culminate in a special worldwide intention Experiment in Japan with Dr. Masaru Emoto in March 2010, where we’ll be attempting to clean up a polluted lake in Japan. So join in now and help us all to clean up the world’s waterways.

Please mark September 19 on your calendar again — and tell everyone you know to register on www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com

We will run the experiment at the same time (4 pm GMT). Here are the time zones:

9 am PDST
10 am MDST
11 noon CDST
12 noon EDST
5 pm British Summer Time
6 pm rest of Europe
2 am Sydney, Australia

How should we evolve?

As months go, my July had to rate as extraordinary, as it involved meeting with two groups who represent most of the major visionaries and thought leaders in this field.

On July 7, I attended on a three-day retreat organized by Deepak Chopra and his team, with some 40 other extraordinary men and women at the Serra Retreat, high up in the hills of Malibu.

Global Visionaries
And what a group: Don Beck, who helped to broker the release of Nelson Mandela; Marianne Williamson, whom I consider the conscience of America; Michael Beckwith, the extraordinary religious leader and visionary; Jean Huston, who single-handedly invented the human potential movement; Barbara Marx Hubbard, self-described as a grassroots futurist; Gregg Braden, wonderful purveyor and synthesizer of ancient and modern wisdom; Bruce Lipton, a brilliant renegade biologist; Dr Joan Boysenzko, noted pioneer in integrated medicine; Debbie Ford, who has introduced ideas about the shadow to millions; her sister Arielle, with her marvellous work about the soul mate and in the entire mind-body-spirit field; and many more brilliant men and women too numerous to mention, but whose profiles are included here. http://www.care2.com/greenliving/meet-the-evolutionary-leaders.html

During three intense days of discussion and reflection, Deepak charged us with an extraordinary task: how do we consciously evolve in these difficult and challenging times?

And indeed, are they dark times or simply times of major and positive change? One of the problems we face is the modern media, that ever present backdrop, systematically cataloguing disaster and imbedding it into our souls.

By way of example, Gregg Braden showed us a trailer from the new movie 2012, which is a terrifying and highly graphic interpretation of this date at the official end of the world.

The fact is, no one knows whether in 2012 we will face Armageddon or a brilliant the flowering of consciousness. Nevertheless, this kind of negative imagery can only impact negatively on us, in one way or another, becoming its own self-fulfilling prophecy.

Current Challenges
What we do know is that globalization; the technological revolution; the failure of the economic system; rising geopolitical tensions; environmental and ecological changes; and vast changes in our established social habits all signal that the world is out of balance and undergoing extraordinary evolution – for good or bad.

Last July, during our first meeting, we agreed to start a movement supporting the fact that the future doesn’t simply have to happen to us; it can be what we consciously create. At that time we put out a Call to Conscious Evolution, and asked for people to sign our petition http://www.care2.com/greenliving/a-call-for-conscious-evolution.html

Changing the Conversation
Our first job, we concluded at this year’s retreat, was to change the conversation, from negative to positive; I am part of a working group to create a new, alternative media, which accentuates the positive and helps to educate people about the new emerging story.

We set up numerous other groups – to create a new website, to write a collective book, to set up a big live event. We also formed into smaller groups to encourage social and political transformation by calling for a more conscious democracy; to promote better health and healing; to introduce the world to the new and emergent forms of society.

We also stressed the need to work on ourselves first – to change our own inner conversations — a notion that hit home with particular force during the next meeting.

The Most Popular People in the Room
In later July I met with another group of thought leaders and our deep friendship and interpersonal connection throughout the four days was profound – perhaps more profound than I’ve ever experienced. Nevertheless, we were in for a shock when undergoing a small exercise, which was meant to test our own perception of how well we were integrated into the group.

We were asked to use ourselves to create a sociogram — a graphic representation plotting the structure of interpersonal relations in a group. In the center of the room was placed a chair. The chair represented 10 (perfect integration into the group) and the very edge of the room 1 (complete lack of integration). We were then were asked to position ourselves in relation to the central chair as a personal measure of how well we fit in.

As soon as the idea was announced, a huge number rushed to be at the very center of the group, leaving numerous others pushed out and at the edges. Although the intention was obviously to demonstrate show how closely integrated we all felt, what actually occurred is that many people were left out – pushed to very outer perimeter.

It was an extraordinary and powerful moment when we all realized what we’d done. My own take on the moment was that own need for inclusion is so powerful that we’re willing to elbow out anyone else in the rush to be accepted. We are so desirous of fully fitting in and so used to pushing our way forward, that we have forgotten how to come together in full cooperation.

Need for New Rules
Even as so-called leaders, we evidence enormous gaps between our own sense of reality and our rapidly changing conditions around us. All of us need to educate ourselves in new ways of thinking and become better observers and integrators of all the forces shaping us globally. We have to be creative, in designing new cultural systems of every variety, and we have to think globally. Our challenge is to create new rules to live by – a new way of being, another world view of who we are and why we’re here.

Even during the earlier Evolutionary Leader meeting, it was difficult for us to rewrite that story, so imbued are we with our old mechanistic way of thinking and being.

Even for we so-called Evolutionary Leaders, it is still a work in progress, a crisis in our own deeply ingrained thinking and habits. None of us is, in fact, an evolutionary leader yet; we are all students, still figuring out the new rules of the game.

Please Join the Conversation
The big idea — the real means of evolutionary change — is still elusive – even to so distinguished a group. That will only come about after engaging in many new conversations, within ourselves and with many others.

So I want to open this conversation to include you.

How should we tackle the challenges facing us: in climate, politics, education, media, science, business, economics, technology and elsewhere? What would you like to see us concentrating on? What is true evolutionary change? What are some of the right systems?

What true changes have to come about in the human heart?

Please write below — and please pass on this blog to everyone you know to do likewise.

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Intention of the Week - Andrea Weist
Help her to become cancer free

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In 1999, Andrea Weist from Lansdowne, Pennsylvania, now 32, was diagnosed with Ewings sarcoma, an aggressive form of bone cancer. The tumor was located on her pelvic bone. She was treated with nine months of chemo, radiation and surgery. She survived and overcame the cancer, but because of the radiation to her pelvic region, her ovaries no longer function. Her experience compelled her to become a nurse so that she would be able to help others the same way her nurses helped her in treatment.

Ten years later, the cancer has returned and in early June, the doctors informed Andrea that the walnut-sized mass in the soft tissue of her pelvic area was Ewings Sarcoma. The next day she had surgery to remove the tumor. She is now recovering from surgery and now is due to undergo 10 months of chemotherapy.

Join us on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com) at 5 pm GMT and hold the following intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Andrea Weist be free of all cancer and remain strong and healthy and well during the chemotherapy and afterward."

Please also include your comments below:

How healing water heals the healers

I’ve been out of communication for a week, as I’ve been zigzagging across North America – first to a meeting of the Evolutionary Leaders (started by Deepak Chopra, and including many thought leaders), and then onto a meeting of the Transformational Leadership Council, set up by Jack Canfield, including many august leaders of and human potential movement. I’ll be writing about both remarkable meetings and their repercussions soon.

I know that all of you have been waiting patiently for the results of our Clean Water Experiment - as have I. The first news I have is that it worked – we had some effect. However, one study on its own means nothing. So at the recent ISSSEEM conference in Boulder, we attempted to replicate our experiment – but this time we did not get results.

To ensure that we have some meaningful evidence from our first experiment, Dr. Gary Schwartz and his team are running controlled experiments next week, and promise to report back promptly. I will have a full run-down for you shortly.

In the meantime, though, we have very interesting results from the survey we ran with the participants. Those who have responded tell us an extraordinary amount about who participated in our experiment – and what happened to them.

Seasoned intenders
First of all, those who participated were highly experienced. More than half (52 per cent) are regular meditators – and a third of our participants have done so for more than 10 years. Furthermore, nearly two-thirds (61 per cent) had read The Intention Experiment. So an overwhelming number of our experimenters were used to applying focused thought.

Nevertheless, many had not used my protocol before; 32 per cent hadn’t practiced Powering Up – my program in The Intention Experiment - until the Clean Water Experiment itself.

But this may be one reason why the first Clean Water Experiment worked and the ISSSEEM attempt did not. All my ISSSEEM intenders were novices, and we know from the scientific evidence that experience counts.

This time, the manner of participation did not make such creative use of technology. More than 85 per cent participated alone on their own computers, with just 5 per cent participating in a group on one computer and 0.7 per cent in a group setting but each using their own computer. Some 82 per cent used a PC, with 16 per cent on a Macintosh and only 1 per cent used a Danger Hiptop.

Just 3 per cent couldn’t access our website, but sent the intention anyway, and 5 per cent chose to participate without knowing the intention by just sending positive intentions at the appropriate time.

One of our participants chose to do so by perching with his computer on a hill top. Although he couldn’t access internet via WiFi, he was happy to send his intention at the right time, anyway.

Few technical hitches
Happily, our technical issues have largely been solved. This time, our website generally worked very well, with less than 10 per cent experiencing trouble registering. Small percentages had trouble with individual pages; one person had problem accessing the forum afterward, others had to use refresh buttons. Your excellent feedback helped a great deal in our learning to refine and improve the process for the next time.

Transformed feelings
Most fascinating were the transformative experiences felt during the process. Nearly a third of our group felt an overwhelming sense of unity and another third a surge of compassionate love. More than half of participants felt a connection with the water or felt very peaceful.

Furthermore, this feeling lasted.

A day later, a quarter of our group felt more peaceful than usual, one-fifth felt happier, one sixth more compassionate and another fifth more connected with others in their lives. Nearly a third felt more optimistic that clean water for all is achievable in the world.

In the following weeks, 31 per cent of our respondents noticed a change in their relationships.

Feel the love
Some 21 per cent felt more love for loved ones, but the most interesting change had to do with the love our participants felt for strangers: 33 per cent felt more love for everyone they came in contact with, 18 per cent felt they got along better with people they normally dislike or argue with, and 10 per cent said they got along better with strangers.

Huge changes occurred in our respondents attitudes toward themselves. More than 26 per cent felt more loving toward themselves and 18 per cent forgave things about themselves or past actions they’d been ashamed of; 32 per cent felt more loving toward the world in general.

These results are similar to those of our Peace Intention Experiment. In that experiment, an overwhelming percentage of our respondents found that the most significant effect occurred in themselves. After participating in a global healing experience, they felt more peaceful and loving themselves. But most of all they were more loving toward strangers.

A group Intention Experiment reminds us of the most important aspect of all about ourselves – that we truly are connected, and that one good collective thought is all it takes to change the world.

Hippie chimps

All animal societies – and also human societies — can be essentially reduced to the organizational dynamic of one of two kinds of monkey: a chimpanzee or a bonobo, known as a dwarf chimpanzee, a variety derived from the other branch of the chimp genetic tree.

Common-or-garden chimpanzees order themselves into a dominant hierarchy, with usually the largest and most aggressive male in charge. He gets first tabs on food and other resources and also first choice of reproductive access to the females. He reinforces his control both with might — periodic fights and contests of strength — and intimidation — elaborate rituals to remind the rest of the group exactly who is in charge (is boss).

In any game pitting a chimp against another chimp, it is usually a zero sum game. The chimp plays to win – at all costs.

Make love, not war
Bonobos, on the other hand, are the hippies of the ape community —
loving, equal opportunity, devil may care. Bonobos societies are matriarchical and maintain sexual equality — females even eat first — and groups of bonobos rarely enter into conflict with outsiders.

A bonobo’s motto is make love, not war, and bonobos are almost absurdly promiscuous – having it off with any one of either sex at any time, graced with a sophisticated sexual repertoire (bonobos even know how to French kiss), endowed with the belief that dinner without a bit of sex beforehand is like a three-course meal without the right wine.

To a bonobo, sex is not a form or dominance or a genetic imperative so much as a means of arbitration, used to resolve conflict and signal friendship and maintain social equilibrium. Sex is the bonobo’s equivalent of ‘I’m okay, you’re okay’, and even used as a variation on ‘hello’ — to diffuse tension when a roaming male strays into a foreign community.

Food sharing is the other social glue, and when food is found, a banquet spread is laid out and the neighborhood invited round, like an Italian family christening on a Sunday afternoon. Chimps maintain social cohesion through a top-down power hierarchy; bonobos generally maintain their society through cooperative teamwork and through caring, in the form of sex and food — in that order.

The more equal, the healthier
For their recently published book, Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Always Do Better, authors Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett spent more than 30 years examining why certain human societies live longer and healthier than others. They concluded that human societies as well fall into either the chimp or the bonobo camp.

But what we were meant to be, according to our genetic coding, is more akin to bonobo than chimp, and it is our disparity in the West between what we should be – equal and loving – and what we are – isolated and competitive – that causes our societal problems.

As they researched the social conditions of virtually every Western country, Wilkinson and Pickett discovered that the more unequal and hierarchical any society, the worse off everyone is — both rich and poor — in terms of virtually every social problem.

Divided we fall
In countries of the very rich and with giant income disparity, both the most affluent and the very poorest suffer from higher rates of ill health, higher crime rates, mental illness, environmental problems and violence. The UK, the US and many countries in Europe, with their vast difference between rich and poor, are among the worse off in virtually every social indicator than countries like Sweden, with less wealth disparity in the population.

We are better off in every way when living in some crude approximation to bonobo society and not in a mode of constant competition.

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Intention of the Week - Emily Esther Gofmekler
Help to ease her ADD

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Emily Esther Gofmekler, who is 14 years old, suffers from Attention Deficit Disorder and is currently in a special education class at school.

Her sister, Margarita Turzhanskaya, says that she has no friends and feels lonely most of the time. She is often bullied and called all kinds of names; she has trouble making friends because no other children want to associate with her. Her mother, who suffers from severe depression, is not paying her much attention.

Margarita says: ‘I would like to suggest an intention to send Emily healing energy and love energy so she may find strength and hope within herself.’

Join us on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com) at 5 pm GMT and hold the following loving intention for 10 minutes:

"My intention is that Emily Gofmekler be healed of ADD, that she make loving friends and that she find strength and hope within herself."

Please also include your comments below:

Light makes the world go round

Why is an energetic footprint as we’re studying in water so important?

As you may know, one of my heroes is Fritz-Albert Popp, a German physicist, who first discovered that we also maintain a constant conversation with our environment in the form of a constant Morse code of light emissions.

Living systems, writes Popp, ‘not only exchange heat with the external world but also signals”, e.g., electromagnetic waves or matter. . . . Every chemical reaction takes place if, and only if, at least one of the reacting compounds is excited by a photon. . . This means that 1) without photons chemical reactions are not possible and 2) the distribution of photons regulates the chemical reactivity in non-living and living matter.”

In other words, light makes the world go round.

Popp has been studying these light emissions for many years at the International Institute of Biophysics, which has 15 groups of scientists from international centres all around the world.

He and his colleagues have uncovered many new findings since those early days. For instance, he’s discovered that the number of these emissions matches on both hands and the forehead, and that they seem to follow weekly and monthly rhythms, which may correspond to energy outside ourselves, such as from the sun.

Universal medicine
One of Popp’s most recent investigations concerns the change in light production after medical treatment. In one experiment, he and his colleagues applied medicated ointment to a spot on a patient’s right arm, and then measured the light emissions from the treated area as well as a number of untreated parts from all over the body.

Similarly, in a patient with psoriasis affecting both arms, Popp applied a standard treatment for psoriasis, shining a UV (Ultraviolet) lamp on both the psoriatic portion of one arm and a healthy portion for five minutes. Shortly afterward, Popp measured the photon emissions from both parts of the arm.

When taking these measurements, Popp and his colleagues used exacting equipment that can count the light emissions, photon by photon – and they discovered something remarkable. If the number of emissions in one part of the body increases or decreases, so do those in other parts of the body.

In his first experiment, Popp found a large change in the number of light emissions not only from where he’d applied the ointment, but also from distant parts of the body. Furthermore, the size of the changes correlated all over the body: even from those places where no ointment had been applied, Popp recorded the same increase in light emissions as from the spot where the medicine had been used.

In the case of the psoriatic patient and the UV light treatment, the emissions roughly quadrupled after using the light from both healthy and unhealthy regions of skin, regardless of whether or not they’d been exposed to the UV lamp.

An hour later, all parts of the body – treated and untreated, healthy and unhealthy – had reverted to identical light emissions, although the healthy regions of skin showed twice the amount of luminescence as the unhealthy regions. This may be because healthy skin doesn’t ‘need’ the light and so ‘gets rid’ of it, whereas the psoriatic regions did have a need for it and so retained it.

Light as global communication
Popp believes that he has uncovered a new communications channel within the body that uses light as a means of instantaneous, or ‘non-local’, signaling to the rest of the living organism. “These signals contain valuable information about the health state of [the body] as well as of therapeutical effects,” he says.

Popp’s research takes us one step closer to understanding the multi-channel method by which the body communicates with itself and with the rest of the universe. Parts of the body tell each other about the state of things with these tiny messages of light.

It also tells us why the tools of modern medicine often have such blunderbuss effects. Even if a therapy is intended for a specific location, this communications channel will cause it to have a global effect.

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Intention of the Week - Lucinda Jayne Goosen-Hack
Help to heal her melanoma

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Lucinda, 26, had a melanoma on her neck in June 2008 and underwent surgery. When melanoma returned in December 2008 and a further operation, Lucinda was given a radical neck incision in January 2009 — a very serious operation largely because of the many nerve endings in the neck.

Lucinda then embarked on a full month of concentrated interferon - given intraveneously - followed by three injections a week over two years. Three weeks after the injections were given tumours started appearing in the neck; there are now 12 tumors in all. Further surgery is not an option, and the doctors are unsure how to proceed.

Lucinda recently embarked on radiation treatment. The family remains positive, but the radiation treatment is very harsh and the outcome uncertain, particularly as melanoma is one of the most aggressive and unpredictable of cancers.

Join us on Sunday, 2 August, 2009 at 5 pm GMT and send the following intention for 10 minutes:

“My intention is for Lucinda Jayne Goosen-Hack to be free of all melanoma or other tumors and all treatment side effects and to be healthy and well in every way.”

Please also include your comments below:

The Japanese X-Factor

In the 1960s, Len Syme, the first sociologist to land a job in the U. S. Department of Health, suspected that social factors had a bearing on certain diseases believed only to have dietary or environmental causes, such as heart disease, cancer or arthritis.

In one of his early attempts to tease out why rates of cardiovascular disease varied in numerous U. S. states, Syme found that the ‘culturally mobile’, as he began to call them — those who’d moved geographically from one societal culture to something quite different, particularly those who’d moved from farms to white collar city jobs – went on to get heart disease. This connection prevailed even when he’d eliminated other factors, such as smoking, blood pressure and all the other supposed major risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Social mobility – moving outside society as you knew it – made you ill.

At the School of Public Health at Berkeley, Syme teamed up with Reuell Stallones, another of Berkeley’s professors, to test his migration hypothesis with the perfect population: the Japanese who’d migrated to Hawaii and California.

The Japanese paradox
As a race, the Japanese fascinate any student of epidemiology because they are such an apparent paradox: they have the lowest heart disease in the world, despite the fact that smoking — one of the biggest risk factors of heart disease — is virtually universal.

Japan’s longevity statistics confound all our expectations about what is required to live a long and healthy life. In fact, Japan produces the world’s largest number of centenarians: almost 18,000 people live to 100 — many of them smokers.

Epidemiologists find transplanted societies particularly instructive, as they afford an opportunity to examine just how a particular community fares when confronted with profound social, cultural or dietary upheaval.

Syme and Stallones examined heart disease risk, plus dietary factors and any social change in a pool of 12,000 men, divided up among those who lived in Japan and two groups that had emigrated to Hawaii or northern California.

Stallones was interested in whether the Japanese had low rates of heart disease because of their low-fat diet, and whether heart disease went up when the Japanese, who maintain an excellent low-fat diet in their home country adopt a typical burger-and-fries American diet, but Syme was interested in the social factor: whether moving countries and cultures was so destabilizing that it caused heart disease.

The results confounded both their expectations. The Japanese men migrating to California had five times the heart disease of those in Japan, while the heart-disease levels in Hawaii were midway between the two, so simply migrating somewhere else didn’t automatically cause disease.

Nevertheless, the results appeared to be completely independent of any of the usual supposed risk factors of heart disease, like smoking, high blood pressure, diet or cholesterol count; in fact, the Japanese population studied contained the highest number of smokers, but the lowest levels of heart disease.

Amazingly enough, their results also appeared independent of any dietary changes. Whatever the Japanese ate — whether tofu or a Big Mac — had no bearing whatever on their propensity to heart disease.

Although changes in the dietary habits made no difference in terms of heart disease, the kind of society the transplants created for themselves did. Those Japanese men who’d adopted American cultural ways suffered the increase in heart disease, while those who’d retained their traditional culture had the lowest levels of heart disease — comparable to Japanese men back home.

The most traditional group of the Japanese Americans had a heart attack rate as low as their fellow Japanese living in Japan, while those who’d adopted the Western go-ahead lifestyle increased their heart attack incidence by three to five times. These differences could not be accounted for by any of the usual risk factors. Those with social networks and social support were protect against heart disease — regardless of whether they smoked or suffer from high blood pressure.

In search of the x-factor
Syme was intrigued enough by these results to travel to Japan in search of the missing x-factor of impregnable health. He interviewed scores of the Japanese to find out the single factor that most distinguished the social fabric of America from that of Japan.

What most marked their culture from that of America, his interviewees repeated in interview after interview, was that Americans were lonely. Anyone could see that. Americans even walked on the street alone.

The Japanese, particularly in southern Japan, maintained tight-knit social groups that were mutually supportive, as was the work environment. Joining a business is not unlike marrying into a family; it is, in most instances, a relationship for life.

In southern Japan, the Japanese even create ‘moai’, a kind of life-long social and financial safety net made up by the contributions of your friends and loved ones.

The heart attack rates of the Californian Japanese-Americans had nothing to do with moving from Japan, but everything to do with losing the close social ties that proved to be Japan’s secret weapon in staying healthy.

In the 1960s, Len Syme, the first sociologist to land a job in the U. S. Department of Health, suspected that social factors had a bearing on certain diseases believed only to have dietary or environmental causes, such as heart disease, cancer or arthritis.

In one of his early attempts to tease out why rates of cardiovascular disease varied in numerous U. S. states, Syme found that the ‘culturally mobile’, as he began to call them — those who’d moved geographically from one societal culture to something quite different, particularly those who’d moved from farms to white collar city jobs – went on to get heart disease. This connection prevailed even when he’d eliminated other factors, such as smoking, blood pressure and all the other supposed major risk factors of cardiovascular disease. Social mobility – moving outside society as you knew it – made you ill.

At the School of Public Health at Berkeley, Syme teamed up with Reuell Stallones, another of Berkeley’s professors, to test his migration hypothesis with the perfect population: the Japanese who’d migrated to Hawaii and California.

The Japanese paradox
As a race, the Japanese fascinate any student of epidemiology because they are such an apparent paradox: they have the lowest heart disease in the world, despite the fact that smoking — one of the biggest risk factors of heart disease — is virtually universal.

Japan’s longevity statistics confound all our expectations about what is required to live a long and healthy life. In fact, Japan produces the world’s largest number of centenarians: almost 18,000 people live to 100 — many of them smokers.

Epidemiologists find transplanted societies particularly instructive, as they afford an opportunity to examine just how a particular community fares when confronted with profound social, cultural or dietary upheaval.

Syme and Stallones examined heart disease risk, plus dietary factors and any social change in a pool of 12,000 men, divided up among those who lived in Japan and two groups that had emigrated to Hawaii or northern California.

Stallones was interested in whether the Japanese had low rates of heart disease because of their low-fat diet, and whether heart disease went up when the Japanese, who maintain an excellent low-fat diet in their home country adopt a typical burger-and-fries American diet, but Syme was interested in the social factor: whether moving countries and cultures was so destabilizing that it caused heart disease.

The results confounded both their expectations. The Japanese men migrating to California had five times the heart disease of those in Japan, while the heart-disease levels in Hawaii were midway between the two, so simply migrating somewhere else didn’t automatically cause disease.

Nevertheless, the results appeared to be completely independent of any of the usual supposed risk factors of heart disease, like smoking, high blood pressure, diet or cholesterol count; in fact, the Japanese population studied contained the highest number of smokers, but the lowest levels of heart disease.

Amazingly enough, their results also appeared independent of any dietary changes. Whatever the Japanese ate — whether tofu or a Big Mac — had no bearing whatever on their propensity to heart disease.

Although changes in the dietary habits made no difference in terms of heart disease, the kind of society the transplants created for themselves did. Those Japanese men who’d adopted American cultural ways suffered the increase in heart disease, while those who’d retained their traditional culture had the lowest levels of heart disease — comparable to Japanese men back home.

The most traditional group of the Japanese Americans had a heart attack rate as low as their fellow Japanese living in Japan, while those who’d adopted the Western go-ahead lifestyle increased their heart attack incidence by three to five times. These differences could not be accounted for by any of the usual risk factors. Those with social networks and social support were protect against heart disease — regardless of whether they smoked or suffer from high blood pressure.

In search of the x-factor
Syme was intrigued enough by these results to travel to Japan in search of the missing x-factor of impregnable health. He interviewed scores of the Japanese to find out the single factor that most distinguished the social fabric of America from that of Japan.

What most marked their culture from that of America, his interviewees repeated in interview after interview, was that Americans were lonely. Anyone could see that. Americans even walked on the street alone.

The Japanese, particularly in southern Japan, maintained tight-knit social groups that were mutually supportive, as was the work environment. Joining a business is not unlike marrying into a family; it is, in most instances, a relationship for life.

In southern Japan, the Japanese even create ‘moai’, a kind of life-long social and financial safety net made up by the contributions of your friends and loved ones.

The heart attack rates of the Californian Japanese-Americans had nothing to do with moving from Japan, but everything to do with losing the close social ties that proved to be Japan’s secret weapon in staying healthy.

Intention of the week

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Intention of the Week - the Swine Flu Scare

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT
Other times:

10 am PDST
11 am MDST
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At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:

Many of our readers have expressed their fears about the swine flu and requested that we do an Intention of the Week. There is a great deal of hype, hysteria and fear based around what is - in terms of sheer numbers and compared to ordinary flu - a relatively benign virus. We’ve covered this in depth in WDDTY: http://www.wddtyhealthshop.com

In the past, fear and hysteria itself has acted like a cancer and caused death.

Let’s use this week to remove fear and to build immunity among everyone:

“My intention is for all the populations around the world not to fear the swine flu and for us to use our energy to build immunity against this and all other viruses.”

Please also include your comments below:

The heart's a lonely hunter

I was fascinated by material my husband Bryan Hubbard wrote about in our current issue of What Doctors Don’t Tell You (website: http://www.wddty.com).  Bryan was attempting to answer why heart disease is still the number 1 killer in the West.  In the US alone, every 37 seconds, someone’s heart fatally packs up.

What Bryan found was nothing short of revelatory: namely, in fingering cholesterol as the bad guy in heart disease, medicine essentially is taking aim at the cavalry. 

Far from being the enemy, cholesterol appears to be the body’s chief means of eleventh-hour cardiovascular repair. It also is essential for keeping the brain sharp, which is why people taking statins often suffer cognitive deficiencies and even staggering memory loss. 

So why do people have heart attacks in the West? Susan Sontag once famously said, ‘illness is metaphor’.  I’ve been thinking about heart disease a good deal lately, and I grow more and more convinced that heart disease is chiefly a disease of emotional pain.

Dying of a broken heart
Lately scientists have been intrigued by a phenomenon called ‘broken heart syndrome’, where an emotional upset, such as the loss of a loved one, causes dysfunction in the ventricular chamber and heart failure in people without previous heart disease. Researchers at Johns Hopkins found that women with this syndrome, which often brought on heart failure, had none of the usual predisposing factors of heart disease.  What they’d suffered was purely psychological — the divorce or the death of a loved one.

Nevertheless, the bereavement or sadness had released such toxic levels of stress hormones, particularly adrenalin,that these had ‘stunned’ the heart, literally causing it to break.
Every so-called lifestyle risk factor laid at the door of cardiovascular illness by the medical community has less to do with someone having a heart attack than simple loneliness.

The role of social ties in heart disease was highlighted in a famous study by S. Leonard Syme, a sociologist at the Unversity of California at Berkeley School of Public Health.  Syme has made it his lifetime study to examine what’s usually called ‘social capital’ in societies.

Social capital measures the strength of any given area’s social fabric:  the trust between citizens, the level of reciprocal behavior, the number of associations and groups.

Syme was fascinated by the fact that even though the Japanese smoke like chimneys, they have very low heart disease in Japan.  Once they move to America, however, their heart disease escalates, although it is lower than American white — even if they quit smoking. 

So he decided to compare the heart attack rates in Japanese Americans in Hawaii and smoke-free California with those of the Japanese in their native land. 

He discovered a clear upward graph:  the lowest statistics in Japan, higher in Hawaii and higher still in California.  None of the usual risk factors like smoking or higher cholesterol made any difference to the mortality statistics.

The only thing that made any difference was the strength of social ties – the social capital.  In Japan and to a slightly lesser extent Hawaii, the Japanese maintained their close social and familial bonds.  In California, however, once they abandoned those ways to Western lifestyle, they started dropping like flies.

Diets make no difference
In some native populations, heart disease is a rarity even when the inhabitants adopt Western diets.  For instance, a group of researchers studying the native populations of the Solomon islands found that they had no coronary heart disease or high blood pressure even after they’d adopted Western diets and religious practices. This puzzled the researchers until they discovered one area that had remained constant:  the social ties and roles within the family.  

The role of social ties in heart disease was highlighted in a study in Nevada versus those of Utah.  They are neighboring states, their ethnic mix is similar, they both have similarly high education statistics, and to all appearances, Nevada is the more successful state, with 15 -20 per cent higher income. 

Nevertheless, their statistics on mortality from heart attack were on opposite ends of the spectrum. Nevada had one of the highest death rates in the country, while Utah had one of the lowest. 

The primary difference between the two states was the stability of the social structure and close-knit families in predominantly Morman Utah, compared with the high degree of broken and dysfunctional family life in Nevada.  It was the weakening of the social fabric, concluded the researchers, that had mostly to do with the difference in mortality.

Rather than worrying about your cholesterol levels, your doctor should be more concerned about the most important diagnostic test of all: the state of your friendships. 

 

Intention of the week

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       Intention of the Week - Ben Rivers

 

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT 
Other times:

10 am PDST
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At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:
Please also include your comments below:

 

 

 

 

Changing (tap) water into wine

The clean water experiment

June 13, 2009
4 pm GMT

Sign up today

www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com
Dear friends,

Our registration page is now ready, and we’re all set for you to sign up for our Clean Water Experiment, being held on June 13, 2009 at 4 pm GMT.

However, you can only participate, if you register, so before you do anything else, please sign up today by clicking through here.

You’ll be asked just a few basic questions for our scientific team (about whether you’re a meditator and what country you’re from).  Then on the day of the experiment, you’ll be able to log straight in. 

It’s important that you sign up BEFORE the experiment runs so that we can estimate server capacity needed and also so that you don’t overload the registration process on the day of the experiment.

Even though you are registered on our main Intention Experiment site, you’ll need to register again for this experiment.

How the experiment will run
This experiment is the first attempt of ours to clean up polluted water. 

As you may know, pollution is caused by bacteria, chemicals and particulates in water,  affecting certain qualities, such as its pH. 

If human consciousness plays a role in the physical world, our intentions may be able to influence the degree of its cleanliness.  The size of the effect may be tiny and not measurable; it might also be significant and detectable. 

Our first step in this historic pilot experiment will be to attempt something very subtle – to change the energetic footprint of tap water so that it is more similar to the energy footprint of mineral water.

Measuring an energy footprint
As you may know, if you’ve been reading my work and participating in these experiments, Russian physicist Dr. Konstantin Korotkov of St. Petersburg State Technical University invented the Gas Discharge Visualization (GDV) technique, which makes use of state-of-the-art optics, digitized television matrices and a powerful computer. Ordinarily, a living thing will dribble out the faintest pulse of photons, perceptible only to the most sensitive equipment in conditions of utter pitch black.  

Korotkov captures the tiny pulse of photons emitted by all living things by stirring them up — ‘evoking’, or stimulating them into an excited state so that they shine millions of times more intensely than normal.

Korotkov’s equipment blends several techniques: photography, measurements of light intensity and computerized pattern recognition. When used on humans, his camera takes pictures of the field around each of the 10 fingers, one finger at a time.

A computer program then extrapolates from this a real-time image of the ‘biofield’ surrounding the person and deduces from it the state of health in the case of a person.

The GDV machine also can record the ‘energy footprint’ of liquids.  The GDV machine examines the emission activity on the surface of the liquid — that is, its ability to retain important information from other molecules.

Korotkov and his team have carried out a great deal of pilot research on a great variety of biological liquids, showing that the GDV equipment is highly sensitive to changes in the chemical and physical contents of liquids — subtle changes that don’t show up in ordinary chemical analyses.

For instance, Korotkov discovered statistically significant differences between the blood samples of healthy people and those patients suffering from cancer or heart disease. He has also found statistically significant changes in water after it was irradiated — even when when homeopathic remedies diluted 30 times were added to it.

Dr. Gary Schwartz, the psychologist and director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health at the University of Arizona, in Tucson, Arizona, has been experimenting with the GDV machine for many years, and in particular examining the ‘energy footprint’ of many substances.

As he told me recently, “Our laboratory has documented that water samples that vary in cleanliness produce different energy patterns as measured by the GDV. 

“We use a special analysis procedure that averages the individual frames of the pictures taken with the camera, producing a summary ‘energy print’ that captures the core stability of the pattern.  One can think of this as an energy fingerprint - in this case, an energy water print.”

Tucson's tap water, Dr. Schwartz says, produces a larger, less symmetric, more unstable looking energy print — compared to that of bottled water. 

Our earlier experiments
As you may recall, we have run two experiments  with Dr. Korotkov himself.  In the First Korotkov Water Experiment, we changed the energy footprint of water by sending love to it.  In the Second Korotkov Water Experiment, we sent a specific intention – to increase the light emissions.  In both instances, we had a result.

This time we’ll be show all of you a photo of the energy print of a sample ordinary tap water, and then a photo of the energy print of bottled water.  We’ll ask you to make our sample’s footprint more like the footprint of the bottled water. 

A blinded study
Once again, our scientists will create a controlled experiment, by supplying us with four possible water samples.  I’ll ask one of my daughters to choose one of the four, but Dr. Schwartz and Mark Boccuzzi, his chief lab technician, will not know which one we’ve chosen. 

On the day of the experiment, we’ll show you the chosen water sample, and ask you to send it your intention — to change its energy pattern to appear more symmetrical and more like that of the natural mineral water. 

After we’re finished, the scientists will place all four samples of water into the GDV machine and photograph and record the energy footprints of all four.

Once they’ve finished, I’ll unblind the study and tell them which one we sent intention to.

They will then use their calculations to determine whether the one sent intention most closely matches the energy print of the mineral water. 

Where this will lead to
If our results are positive, we will have the first evidence that intention can be used to clean up water.  From there, we will work with Dr. Schwartz’s labs and other laboratories to attempt to change pH or alter bacteria.  We’ll also attempt such a study in a ‘live setting’. 

However, this will only work with a large body of participants, so please register today, by clicking through here.

You will be taken to another landing page (www.thecleanwaterexperiment.com), which we’ve set up to ease congestion on this site.

So please. . . sign up today, and tell at least three friends to do so.

You make me feel so good

Although I believe that everything in our lives benefits from the use of intention, in the Intention Experiment, on this website and in my workshops I’ve deliberately chosen to emphasize using intention for an altruistic purpose.

This just seemed like common sense to me – after all, if our thoughts are all that powerful, then instead of only focusing on getting that new BMW or new job, maybe we can use this power collectively to help alleviate the vast catalogue of suffering on the planet – particularly in these times of great upheaval.

But after our big Intention Experiments and also at my workshops, I was fascinated to learn about the profound effect that our group Intention Experiments have on everybody involved. During my workshops, I ask people to break into small groups and send intention to someone with a healing challenge. 

Healing heals the healer
Invariably, the effect is nothing short of transformative. Those sent intention report remarkable healing effects — but so do the senders. Perfect strangers begin to hug each other. The separation between people lessens. The love in the room is utterly palpable.

As many of you reported on our Peace Intention Experiment survey, a similar situation occurred when you sent intention for peace in Sri Lanka.  Hundreds of the participants reported feeling far more happy and peaceful themselves, with more love for perfect strangers.

All this positive effect among the people doing the sending   suggested to me that something about sending intention for an altruistic purpose feels good – as good as, if not better than, sending intention for yourself. So I wanted to find out whether this kind of caring, compassion and the desire to help is somehow hardwired into our very make up.

I didn’t have to look too far. I came across a fascinating study by James Rilling and Gregory Berns, two American neuroscientists at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, who decided to observe the real-time behavior of the brain during an altruistic act by scanning people as they were engaged in a true social interaction.

Prisoner’s dilemma
They employed functional MRI scanners to record the brain activity of 36 women as they took part in a game called “Prisoner’s Dilemma’, a classic psychological model used to assess levels of cooperation between two people. In every round of the game, each partner is allowed to choose whether to cooperate with the other partner or to ‘defect’ – to operate selfishly, for his or her own gain. 

In the classic version of this game, two people are arrested for robbing a bank and placed in separate cells isolated from each other.  The prosecutor offers each of them a deal. They can either confess or remain silent.  If one of them confesses while the other remains silent, all charges will be dropped against the confessor, but the silent one will get a maximum sentence.

If both confess, they’ll be convicted but will be given early parole.  If both are silent, they’ll only be charged with possession of firearms.  

The ‘dilemma’ is that while each is better off confessing, the outcome is worse than it would be if each remained silent.

Test of altruism
The study is thought to examine the nature of cooperation and a test of altruism, as the two people are more likely to benefit if they work together than if they pursue their own self-interests. 

It also tests the idea that operating from the heart – that is, acting against one’s own best interests – works better in group situations than operating purely for rational self-interest.

In the Emory University version of the game, when the two players were asked to independently to choose to cooperate with each other or to defect, each would receive a sum of money depending on both players’ choices in the round. 

Once again, the biggest reward was for defecting. 

Rilling and Berns were fascinated to find that mutual cooperation — both players choosing the same outcome — was the most common outcome. 

But interestingly, when the partners cooperated with each other, both demonstrated activation in  the caudate nucleus and anterior cingulate cortex - the same area of the brain activated when people receive rewards or undergo a pleasurable experience.

Giving felt good – as soon as getting something for yourself. Doing something for someone else literally was its own reward.
Rilling and Berns had also examined brain activity in their participants when they were playing with a computer as the partner.  In those instances, the pleasure zone areas of the brain did not light up. 

Giving is hard-wired
 “Our study shows, for the first time, that social cooperation is intrinsically rewarding to the human brain, even in the face of pressures to the contrary,” said Berns, who is associate professor of psychiatry at Emory University School of Medicine’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. 

“It suggests that the altruistic drive to cooperate is biologically embedded — either genetically programmed or acquired through socialization during childhood and adolescence.”

Rillings believes that our in-built reward system reinforces our positive choices in helping – the more we do it, the better it feels – which in turn spurs us on to help others. 

As Clint Kilts, a co-investigator in the study, noted, ‘It defines the most complex form of the human genesis of a social bond.’ 

We help others and cooperate because it feels good to do so.  Sending intention to others feels so good because by doing for others we are literally doing for ourselves.

 

Intention of the week

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       Intention of the Week - Sri Lanka
                                
                     May, 22 2009 - 5pm GMT

 

                               

As you may know, Sri Lanka was our target of the Peace Intention Experiment last September.  When we ran the experiment, a 25-year civil war had raged – one of the longest and bloodiest of the world, with more suicide bombings than anywhere on earth.  At the time of our experiment, the well-armed and trained forces of the Tamil Tigers had control of the North and East of the country and still had a firm upper hand.

For eight days beginning September 14, The Intention Experiment carried out its first Peace Intention Experiment, with thousands of participants from more than 65 countries and every continent but Antarctica.

Noted peace advocate Dr. Kumar Rupesinghe and his colleagues from the Foundation for Co-existence in Columbo, Sri Lanka, supplied us weekly violence data from the past two years for both the North and Eastern sections, and continued to monitor both areas for daily rates of killings and violence for some months after our intention week.

From these statistics, Dr. Jessica Utts, professor of Statistics at University of California at Irvine, created a statistical time-analysis model, which seems to demonstrate that the very week of Peace Intention Experiment week could have been pivotal in helping to hasten the end of the war.  These effects appeared corroborated by the work of Dr. Roger Nelson of the Global Coherence Project.  The full report is available on our website.

That very week initiated a turn-around in the war, which culminated with the end of the war this week.  Now, we don’t know if this is an amazing coincidence, or a genuine effect, and we won’t know until we repeat the experiment.

Nevertheless, peace in Sri Lanka has extracted a terrible price. Thousands of civilians have been killed or severely wounded in the crossfire or used as human shields. The UN and the EU are now investigating allegations of war crimes and violations of human rights by both sides – the rebels and the government.  The government refused the humanitarian aid of the west. 

As the Economist wrote, ‘The Tigers may be dead, but the bitter ethnic divisions that fuelled the 26-year war live on. . . . The territorial conflict may be over but a humanitarian disaster is still unfolding.’

The war is over – that much is good.  However, the government needs to unite all minorities in peace and to recognize the civil rights of all its people. Let’s send a special intention to heal these deep wounds:

To participate, come onto our website a few minutes before 5 pm GMT (other time zones on our site), click on the Intention of the Week and send an intention for 10 minutes.

 

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT 
Other times:

10 am PDST
11 am MDST
12 noon CDST
1 pm EDST
6 pm British Summer Time
7 pm rest of Europe

At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:

 “My intention is for the all ethnic groups in Sri Lanka to unite together in love, peace, mutual respect and civil rights for all.”

 

Please also include your comments to Sri Lanka, below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

First Name:
Email:
Joining the Intention Experiment community allows you to participate in the experiment, speak with other intenders and receive Lynne’s weekly newsletter.
(Your details will not be passed on to third parties.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Clean Water Experiment

Last week I announced that we’ll be running a new Intention Experiment on July 13 – this time, to see if we can use intention to clean up polluted water. Thank you all for your wonderful ideas about where we can use the power of our collective intention in real life. 

After we test this experiment in a controlled way in a laboratory setting, we’ll try it out on a real body of water.  But in order to provide evidence that our intention actually can clean up water, we need first to demonstrate this scientifically, with Dr. Gary Schwartz and his University of Arizona team.

Our web team at Copper Strings, who handled our Peace Intention Experiment last September, are busy assembling a separate landing page for our experiment. As with our earlier experiments, our June 13 experiment will not take place on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com), but will have a separate landing page to go to, in order to ease the huge traffic we’ll experience on the day.

The team are also working on a separate registration area so that we will won’t have the log-jam that we have faced in the past.

So in order to participate, you will need to register again – on this new mini site. Next week I’ll explain exactly what to do and how to register. 

Remember: we’re asking you to register again because this is a scientific experiment.  Our scientific team at the University of Arizona need to know exactly how many are participating.  Otherwise, we can’t quantify our success.

Here are a baker’s dozen of steps you’ll have to take in order to take part in this historic event.

1. REGISTER on the new landing pages, as soon they are ready.  Everyone who registers will receive additional information about how to take part.

2. FILL OUT THE SHORT SURVEY.  After registering, you will be asked to fill out a short survey. This survey will ask you a few basic questions, such as the country you’re from, whether you’re a regular meditator, whether you follow The Intention Experiment’s Powering Up program, etc.  These questions are purely for our scientific team, who wish to have some basic demographics about our participants.  We won’t be asking anything personal, and we won’t share your data with anyone else.

3. MARK DOWN THE DATE on your calendar and in your diary. Allow at least 40 minutes or more – 15 minutes of coming on early, 10 minutes preparing, and 10 minutes for the experiment. Also allow for a few minutes more to blog with our community about your experience.

4. CHECK OUT the time in your local time zone and WRITE IT DOWN NOW. Remember:  all of us need to participate at the same moment, and the experiment will only run for 20 minutes.  It’s really important that you know exactly when it is running in your time zone.

 In past experiments, many people have got the time wrong, and missed the experiment.  

The Clean Water Experiment will be running on June 13, 2009 at 4 pm Greenwich Mean time. 

That’s the same time as:
 
9 am US Pacific DST
10 am US Mountain DST
11 am Central DST
12 noon Eastern DST
5 pm British Summer Time
6 pm rest of Western Europe
2 am Sydney, Australia (sorry, Ozzies)

For other time zones, click on this website, which will help you convert to your own time zone.

5. TELL EVERYONE YOU KNOW about the Clean Water Experiment, and ask to take part.  As with the Peace Intention Experiment, we’d like a large body of participants we can to maximize our effect.

6. BUY OR BORROW my book, The Intention Experiment. Reading my book is not a condition of participating. Nevertheless, it will help you to participate more fully.  It provides the fullest explanation of the power of intention and my POWERING UP program, the most complete program of how to do intention, distilled from evidence I gathered from a wide variety of intention masters.  Buying my book also helps to defray any costs of these experiments. 

7. PRACTICE POWERING UP.  Once you register, you’ll also receive information from me about how to practice intention — the right mind and emotional states, the right time and place —  so that you have time to practice.  The sooner you register, the more time you’ll learn how to do intention.

8. GET YOUR COMPUTER READY a few days before the event.  Ensure that you have access to it at least a half hour to 15 minutes before we’re due to start.

9.  ON THE DAY OF THE EXPERIMENT, SIGN IN EARLY — at least 15 minutes beforehand.  If you participated in earlier experiments, you recall that we were victims of our own success – so many people tried to participate that it was sometimes difficult to access the landing pages. 

Last time, our web team worked on a means of controlling the flipping of pages on our Peace Intention Experiment portal website pages, and staggering timings by a few seconds between the various participants, so that our site wouldn’t be overwhelmed by traffic.  It ended up working well across the week.  They’ll be doing something similar here, so that we don’t overwhelm the site.

10. READ AND FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS. After signing in you’ll be sent to the first page of the experiment. Read the instructions, which will tell you to start powering up.  Get into your meditative state and hold it, in readiness for the start of the experiment.

11.  FOCUS ON THE INTENTION TARGET.  After 5-10 minutes, you’ll be directed to the experiment page.  Only at that point will we show you the Intention Experiment target, which will be a sample of water.  We’ll also reveal at that time the exact intention we’d like you to send for exactly 10 minutes.  PLEASE FOCUS YOUR THOUGHTS ONLY AND ENTIRELY ON THAT PARTICULAR BODY OF WATER.  In future, we’ll try intention experiments with ‘real’ bodies of water, which pollution problems.  For now, you can help most by joining everyone else with the exact same thought. 

During the 10 minutes of the experiment, our website will play Choku Rei, the famous Reiki chant by Jonathan Goldman that we have used for all our experiments. 

12. SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES.  Immediately after the experiment, there will be a link for you to return to our Social Community (www.theintentionexperiment.ning.com), where you can share with others your immediate reactions and sensations. 

13.  TELL US HOW IT WAS FOR YOU.  After the experiment, I will ask you to fill out a short survey, similar to the survey I used for the Peace Intention Experiment, asking if your life has changed in any way after the experiment.  This questionnaire also helps me and my scientists in our research.  Again, we won’t be asking personal questions. 

While you await the creation of our new registration form, please tell everyone you know to register on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com) to receive all the latest information about this and other Intention Experiments.

In the meantime, share with me below your intention of the week.  What Intention do you wish to hold for your life this week?

Announcing: The Clean Water Intention Experiment

 

June 13, 2009

4 pm GMT

 

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Dear Readers:

 

I am thrilled to announce that we have now planned another Intention Experiment, this time with a fantastic target: clean water.  We’re working once again with our psychologist Gary Schwartz at the University of Arizona’s Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health and his fabulous chief lab technician Mark Boccuzzi. 

 

Mark, as you may remember, carried our Germination Experiments, which required hours of meticulous preparation. 

 

This experiment marks the start of our work in attempting to take intention out into the community with real targets and real results. 

 

Why water?

Water is an excellent target because, as we’ve shown in our own Korotkov Water Experiments, water is highly susceptible to intention. A solid body of scientific evidence has examined chemical changes caused by intention.

 

Bernard Grad, an associate professor of biology at McGill University in Montreal, for instance, has examined the effect of healing energy on water that was to be used to irrigate plants. After a group of healers had sent healing to samples of water, Grad chemically analysed the water by infrared spectroscopy.

 

He discovered that the water treated by the healers underwent a fundamental change in the bonding of oxygen and hydrogen in its molecular makeup. The hydrogen bonding between the molecules had lessened in a similar manner to that which occurs in water exposed to magnets. 

 

A number of other scientists confirmed Grad’s findings; Russian research discovered that the hydrogen–oxygen bonds in water molecules undergo distortions in the crystalline microstructure during healing.

 

In William tiller’s Black Box experiments, he has also shown that intention can affect water pH – the measure of acidity or alkalinity in a solution up and down by one unit.  Ordinarily pH –remains fairly static and tiny changes of one-hundredth or even one-thousandth of a unit on the pH scale can be measured; a change of a full unit or more on the pH scale would represent an enormous shift that was unlikely to be the result of an incorrect measurement.

 

Power of positive thoughts

We also know from numerous studies, including one attempting to scientifically validate the theories of Masaru Emoto, that the structure of water crystals is affected by positive and negative emotions.

 

Emoto claims to have carried out hundreds of tests showing that even a single word of positive intent or negative intent profoundly changes the water’s internal organization. The water subjected to the positive intent supposedly develops a beautiful, highly complex crystalline structure when frozen, whereas the structure of water exposed to negative emotions became random, disordered, even grotesque. The most positive results supposedly occur with feelings of love or gratitude.

 

Consciousness investigator Dean Radin placed two vials of water in a shielded room in his laboratory at the Institute of Noetic Sciences in Petaluma, California. Meanwhile, a group of 2000 attendees at one of Emoto’s conferences in Japan was shown a photo of the vials and asked to send them a prayer of gratitude.

 

Radin then froze the water in those vials as well as samples of control water from the same source that had not been exposed to the prayers, and showed the resulting crystals to a panel of independent volunteers.

 

He had carefully blinded the study so that neither he nor his volunteers had any idea which crystals had been grown from the water samples that had been sent intention. A statistically significant number of the volunteer judges concluded that water sent the positive intentions had formed the more aesthetically pleasing crystalline structure.

 

Inhibiting bacteria

 We also have seen that positive or negative intention has a profound effect on microorganisms, like bacteria. For instance, Carroll Nash, the director of the parapsychology department at St Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, carried out work using intention to affect the grown of Escherichia coli, microbes with a direct impact on human beings. Millions of this bacteria, which help to digest food and keep hostile bacteria at bay, peacefully reside in the gut. E coli also metabolizes lactose, the enzyme present in milk. Yet, as with many microbes, E. coli can suddenly turn unfriendly by migrating out of the digestive tract or mutating into a virulent form that causes illness. Many toxic strains are also present in food.

 

Nash decided to test whether mental influence could affect the mutation rates of E. coli bacteria. Usually, an E. coli population starts life unable to ferment lactose (and so is ‘lactose-negative’), but after it mutates, over numerous generations, the new population can do so (at which point it become ‘lactose-positive’).

 

This process ordinarily occurs at a predictable rate. Nash wanted to see whether his volunteers could slow it down or speed it up. To work out the growth rates of these tiny organisms, Nash employed an electrophotometer, which counts the microbes by measuring the slightest differences in the density of the media in which they are suspended.

 

Each of his 60 student participants received nine test-tubes containing both lactose-negative and lactose-positive strains of E coli culture. The students were asked to mentally encourage the transformation of the unmutated bacteria in the first three test-tubes from lactose-negative to lactose-positive. With the next three test-tubes, they were to attempt to inhibit the process of mutation. The final three, the controls, would not be exposed to influence of any kind.

 

Bacteria affected

When he tallied the results, Nash discovered more mutation than normal in the test-tubes that had received the positive intentions to mutate, and fewer than normal in those for which intentions were to inhibit the process, although the greatest effect occurred with negative intention.

 

Gary Schwartz also has also shown that bacteria that has been ‘shocked’ by a sudden blast of heat can be ‘healed’ by intention sent by Reiki practitioners, particularly once they’d worked on a human patient first and their healing ‘pumps’ had been primed, so to speak.

 

All these early studies revealed several important aspects of intention. Thoughts take aim with great accuracy; although their effects on living things can drastically differ depending on the nature of the intention – whether it is positive or negative.

 

We also know from our earlier work, particularly the Germination studies, that we are more successful, the more specific we are with our intention.

 

Our challenge is to work out a way to do this experiment that sends a specific intention that does not entail murderous intention - ‘killing’ bacteria.  We are examining the possibility of sending an intention to mutate the bacteria, so that it is harmless, or attempting to affect the growth of algae in water.

 

How to participate

At the moment, while we are working on the protocol, the most important thing is to register on our website (www.theintentionexperiment.com), if you have not done so before.  Then you will receive information about how to proceed.  You may have to register again to participate in the experiments, as we are using another web host. 

 

So write down the date and time now and tell all your friends.

For other time zones, consult the world clock consult the world clock and use their converter. Simply type in June 13 4 pm GMT  and write in your location, and the converter will tell you what time it will be in your area.

 

Out in the field

Once we’ve tried this experiment a few times in the lab, we’ll take it out in the field.  I’m planning a series of experiments, including one with Masaru Emoto, to clean up a body of water in Japan. 

 

Please make some suggestions below for good bodies of water that would make good targets for us,  plus ways we can send positive but highly specific intention.

 

 

Intention of the week

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       Intention of the Week - Emily Kate Saunders
                                
                     May, 03 2009 - 5pm GMT

 

                               

Emily Saunders, 31, who lives in west London, in the UK, has cancer in her small intestine, which has grown 
to grapefruit size, and now encompasses the area around 
her pancreas, spleen, and organs positioned between her solar plexus 
and spine. 

 

It is inoperable since it is attached to too 
many organs. She is about to initiate chemotherapy next week to attempt to 
reduce the tumor so that it will become operable.


 

At present, she’s unable to eat, owing to the blockage, and vomiting
regularly.
 

 

“We are very grateful that she is to be included in the intention 
experiment,” says her friends and family, “and giving her that information has already helped to 
raise her spirits, so many thanks for that.”

 

Please take 10 minutes this Sunday to send intention to Emily at 5 pm Greenwich Mean Time. For details of that time in your time zone, please consult our website front page and click on Intention of the Week.

 

 

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT 
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At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:

“My intention is for all of the organs and cells in Emily Saunders’ body to return to normal and for her to be healthy and well in every way.”  

 

Please also include your comments to Emily, below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

First Name:
Email:
Joining the Intention Experiment community allows you to participate in the experiment, speak with other intenders and receive Lynne’s weekly newsletter.
(Your details will not be passed on to third parties.)

 

 

 

 

Great brains think alike

Lately, I’ve been studying the research about brain patterns between people to work out exactly when it is that we get on someone else’s wavelength – and why.  In this process, I came across some fascinating material about what happens to us physically when we work together for a common purpose.

In this study, carried out at the Center for Lifespan Psychology at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, in Berlin, Germany and the University of Salzburg, in Austria, the scientists wanted to determine whether our brains, in a sense, ever act ‘in tandem’ with others when we’re engaged in a common purpose, considering that so much of our interaction with the world consists in synchronized and goal-directed actions with other people.

Although research had been done with functional magnetic resonance imaging, no one before had examined simultaneous brain wave activity between people doing some work together.

A brain wave of a study
The German and Austrian scientists themselves had a brain wave.  They decided to study brain activity of each of eight pairs of guitarists playing a short melody together to see to what extent cortical activity is synchronized between people when they’re working together (or, in this case, ‘swinging in concert’, as they put it).

They were encouraged by recent studies of two people when they socially interact. They found that one rhythm was associated with independent behavior, while another brain wave rhythm showed up and was shared by both parties when the behavior was coordinated. 

In this study, the Germans made use of an electroencephalogram (EEG), which measures electrical activity in the brain and is extraordinarily sensitive, capable of picking up the most minute of effects – even one-millionth of a volt of electricity.

Each of the eight musicians were instructed to wear a EEG cap while they played together, and the brain activity was then recorded.

Using special algorithms to both analyze of the brain activity of each person and in relation to his partner, the scientists found that the brain waves of each pair were highly synchronized and ‘in phase’ – that is, the waves peaking and troughing at certain points while preparing and beginning their coordinated play. 

In fact, entire areas of the brain had synchronized patterns, with the frontal and central regions the strongest, but the temporal and parietal regions also showing high synchronization in at least half the guitarist pairs. 

As the scientists discovered, the brain waves were most synchronized just when the musicians listened to the metronome to set the tempo and then when they began playing they melody together. 

The researchers concluded that whenever people do things together in a synchronized fashion, their brain waves follow suit.

We don’t yet know whether these couplings play an important role in maintaining interpersonal relations.  Nevertheless, it appears that it may do, particularly as this kind of brain wave synchronization also appears to have a vital role in early social development. 

In synch with mom
This begins with the first and most important relationship: our mothers. From our first breath, our heart waves and brain waves copy those of our mother whenever she is close by. 

Researchers such as Joseph Chiltern Pearce, author of Magical Child (Penguin, 2002), investigating why mothers are so naturally able to care for their children, discovered that the electrical frequencies of both the hearts and brains of both mother and child tend to go into entrainment, or synchrony, when the mother is engaged in breastfeeding or some other close direct interaction.

Indeed, other researchers, such as neurologist Dr. Alan Schore, who has done seminal work on attachment theory, believe that a baby learns to fire and wire its brain from its mother, who acts like a kind of brain-wave ‘template’.

As Schore once put it,  ‘The prefrontal cortex of the mother becomes the prefrontal cortex of the infant.’

Our pre-frontal lobes essentially get copied from this master template. 

Psychologist Dr. Gary Schwartz from the University of Arizona has even been able to identify the EEG pattern of the mother encoded within the EEG of the child and vice versa.  He believes that this encoding may be more pronounced, the closer the two are.

As I recounted in my book The Intention Experiment, a great deal of evidence show that under many types of circumstances, the electrical signalling in the brains of people gets synchronized (See the chapter called ‘The Love Study’).

This is particularly the case when someone is sending loving intention to the other. 

Ultimately, this could be the basis of all close relationships. We are able to get on with each other by getting on each other’s brain wave.

What fires together. . .
Donald Hebb first suggested in 1949 that neurons become more efficient and operate as a unit when they are repeatedly and persistently stimulated together.  Or as scientists usually put it: Neurons that fire together wire together.

What may be also true is that people who fire together wire together.

I think this is what may be happening when we carry out intention in small groups. As you know, I have supported the creation of micro communities on the Intention Experiment website or in my workshops.

I witness a powerful bonding between perfect strangers that can occur in a single day, which may have something to do with the seemingly miraculous healings that occur.

Uniting in common purpose
So this new research, while very preliminary, has a great significance.  When we work with others for a common purpose, we very quickly and literally get on their wave length.

Consider this in relation to what we discussed last week – how our modern middle-class neighborhoods have become toxic to all concerned.

I witnessed firsthand how uniting in common purpose can dissolve many seemingly insurmountable differences.  I live on the outskirts of London among a group of professionals, with whom I have little in common, and there is little neighborly interaction except of the most perfunctory variety.

However, this all changed several years ago, when Orange, a British cell phone company, announced its intention to install eight cell towers in our town, with one right on our block.

My neighbors and I were extremely concerned about the potential detrimental effects of a cell tower, particularly on our health, and within days, we were party to the most extraordinary social transformation. Eight of the women (myself included) came together and formed a ‘housewife’s’ brigade to protest Orange’s plans.

Faced with a common purpose, we needed no one in charge.  Everyone simply volunteered to take on whatever was necessary, and the division of labor happened automatically.

I was most interested, however, in the effect of this crisis on our relationships. I watched with fascination as this group of women with virtually nothing in common put aside their differences and began to relate to each other on a deeper level. In this emergency, we found the soul of a community we’d never thought we had.

All this suggests that coming together in small groups with a common purpose will unite us and provide a social cohesion beyond money, job or size of property.

What are your thoughts about how to create this new neighborhood  of common purpose, to replace Wisteria Lane?  Write below, or write in to us at cs@livingthefield.com.

Intention of the week

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       Intention of the Week - Larry James Gravning
                                
                           April 26, 2009 - 5pm GMT

 

This appeal comes from Dawn Galster from our Intention community about her brother, Larry James Gravning.  Larry, who is 58, is now living Bellingham, Washington, USA.  “He has always been a gentle and hard-working family man (Larry is a carpenter),” says Dawn. 
Recently, he was diagnosed with prostate cancer, a seemingly devastating blow after a series of very serious health problems (a seven-bypass heart surgery and an even more dangerous surgery to prevent an aortic aneurysm), and the loss of his wife of more than 30 years to cancer.

“I cannot express how grateful we are to all of the prayers and positive energies that are coming Larry's way,” says Dawn.  “He is very deserving.  Thank you and God Bless.”

Please come on the site at 5 pm GMT (see our website for other time zones), Power Up and spent 10 minutes holding the following intention:

 

 

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT 
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At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:

“My intention is for all of Larry Gravning’s prostate cells to return to normal and for him to be healthy and well in every way.”

Please also include your comments to Larry, below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

First Name:
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Joining the Intention Experiment community allows you to participate in the experiment, speak with other intenders and receive Lynne’s weekly newsletter.
(Your details will not be passed on to third parties.)

 

 

The Wisteria Lane Syndrome

My two teenager daughters are suckers for Desperate Housewives, the television soap opera detailing all the jealousy, intrigue, backstabbing and criminal activity that lays behind the doors and manicured lawns of that upscale suburban neighborhood, Wisteria Lane.

Although almost all the inhabitants are beautiful and affluent, no one stays happy for long. All of these ‘best friends’ are miserable in their constant comparison with each other.

So I was fascinated to read a recent intriguing study of suicide, carried out by Mary Daly and Daniel Wilson of the US Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, with Norman Johnson of the US Census Bureau.  They examined suicide deaths to see if it had anything to do with income.

The rich are different
Although it appeared that the less you made the more likely you were to kill yourself, closer analysis showed this wasn’t the case. 

It was true that individuals in the very lowest income bracket – with family incomes below $20,000 in 1990 dollars (the equivalent of about $31,000 US in 2006) — were significantly more likely to commit suicide than those with incomes above $60,000.

But for anyone making anything over $20,000, one’s own income had no significant effect on suicide risk.

The only time individual income mattered in any way was in comparison to the level of income in your own county. 

And most startling of all, the richest areas of America had the greatest risk of suicide.

So Daly, Wilson and Johnson examined this a little more closely.  They looked at whether this had anything to do with the high cost of living, or the high cost of housing, or the difference between renters and buyers, the cost of living across the entire state, the reporting biases about suicides or even poorer access to emergency health care. 

Me and Mrs. Jones
But in every instance, the only connection that wouldn’t go away was the effect of comparing one’s own income to others around you.  And the richer everyone was around you, the more miserable you were likely to be.

In the crudest terms, for every $10,000 more your neighbors made than you, your suicide probability increased by 7.5 per cent.

Simple desire to keep up with the Joneses was the most likely ingredient for self-harm.

Most significantly, in the Federal Reserve study, the higher the benchmark (in terms of the most affluent neighbourhoods), the higher the stakes, the more likely the inhabitants were to find themselves falling short and the greater the suicide risk.

Income envy across the pond
Income envy also is rife in Europe.  Another study prepared by Andrew Clark and Claudia Senik from the Paris School of Economics, showed once again that Europeans also are constantly judging themselves by examining where they stand on the economic ladder in comparison to everyone around them. 

In the European Social Survey, which polled 34,000 people from 23 countries, Clark and Senik found that three-quarters of those polled in Europe believed that it was important to compare their own earnings against others.  Nevertheless, the more they did so, the unhappier they became. 

The researchers judged happiness through responses to questions about whether people believe that they live comfortably, felt optimistic, had been depressed recently and felt satisfied with their lives thus far.

The least harmful to overall happiness were comparisons made against co-workers, while income envy of family members proved to be far more erosive. 

Nevertheless, the toxic of all was what I call the Wisteria Lane Syndrome: comparisons against one’s friends.  These were considered twice as damaging as against work colleagues.

The constant yardstick
The other fascinating aspect of this study and others that examine happiness is that they scientifically confirm that overall rise in standard of living doesn’t buy happiness and contentment. 

As two studies have demonstrated, someone’s self-declared happiness had nothing to do with any objective benchmark, such as increase in overall national income, but only whether he felt that he measured favourably against entirely personal benchmarks: his aspirations and expectations of what he should be making, particularly as compared with everyone around him.

It’s called the Easterlin Paradox, in psychology studies, and it means that there is no objective measure of success, only individual measures formed by our aspirations and expectations and those of our nearest and dearest.

A yardstick is always on hand, to measure my accomplishments, my possessions, my money and even my children against yours.

So it’s come to this.  In our modern-day world, happiness is entirely dependent upon expectation and certain entirely arbitrary or conditional standards against which you judge yourself, which are usually what you believe are the standards of other people.

Studies of optimists and pessimists show that optimistic people only compare themselves with those less fortunate (lucky me), whereas pessimistic people make constant comparisons with the more successful and find themselves wanting (unlucky me). Both in a sense are toxic. On the one hand you enhance yourself by demonstrating that you’re so much better off than all the other sorry souls around you; on the other, that you are the sorriest soul you know.

Taking out the competition
There’s a growing batch of research demonstrating that when you remove the competitive nature of human relationships, we begin to flourish. New developments in behaviorial psychology and biology reveal that we were never meant to live a life of fundamental isolation and self-serving survival.

Compare this to the research I’ve discussed before of a sampling of Americans in the US’s lowest income bracket.  They suffered from virtually no stress about their financial circumstances, so long as they had two means of support:  a strong spiritual connection and a strong community. Clearly, even when engaged in a daily struggle to survive, they were able to manage so long as they didn’t do so alone.

It’s now evident why ‘Do not covet your neighbor’s goods’ was included in the Ten Commandments. Comparison is one of the most toxic of all human endeavors.  It’s time we thought about setting up a new style of neighborhood, where the primary goal isn’t a bigger car or a more immaculate lawn but a committed, supportive and sharing community, whatever its income level.

Intention of the week

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              Intention of the Week - Erika Heywood
                                Help her regain motor control
                                April 19, 2009 - 5pm GMT


Here’s a remarkable story of intention and courage, sent in by  alternative therapist. Erika Heywood, 53, who lives in Basingstoke, England, was diagnosed 14 years ago with motor neurone disease (MND) after 13 months of symptoms.  

 

The doctors’ prognosis was bleak:  she would suffer severe and progressive motor dysfunction, and sure enough, within two years Erika was using a wheelchair and could only communicate by using one finger on her computer keyboard. Her situation was compounded by the fact that she lives alone, with carers visiting each day to tend to her needs.

 

Despite her doctors’ prediction, three years ago Erika added the Bowen Technique and Reiki to her regular complementary therapy sessions of aromatherapy and reflexology.  Through this regime, coupled with a radical change in her diet, daily positive affirmations and undoubted courage, Erika is gradually regaining control of motor functions.  

 

Erika can now lift her head, speak more comprehensibly, and with concentrated effort she can move her shoulders, arms and legs.

 

Let’s see if we can boost her even more.  She also needs help in finding new carers.

  
 

 

 

 

Please join in on Sunday, 5 pm GMT 
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At that time, please come together on the site and send a 10-minute intention:

My intention is for Erika Heywood to regain sufficient motor control and lung capacity, so that she is able to walk and talk again.  I also intend for her to find appropriate and excellent carers within the next few weeks.’

Please also include your comments to Erika, below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Name:
Email:
Joining the Intention Experiment community allows you to participate in the experiment, speak with other intenders and receive Lynne’s weekly newsletter.
(Your details will not be passed on to third parties.)

 

 

 

 

 

Making a monkey out of science

I’m in the midst of studying altruism, as you may have noticed by how often I return to this subject, and I am fascinated by the argument raging among biologists about the meaning of so-called altruistic acts in the animal kingdom. 

Most scientists believe there is no such thing as true kindness in the animal kingdom.  As Richard Dawkins once remarked, “Only human beings make the error of altruism.”

According to this mindset, human beings carry out unselfish acts only out of misguided emotion, such as guilt, and animals only demonstrate altruistic behavior when caring for their young, or when living in a large pack or herd. 

Genetic favorites
As some of our correspondents noted with my ‘bee blog’, many scientists have convinced themselves that what appears to be altruism in the animal kingdom is a variation on what they term ‘kin selection’.

Acts of self-sacrifice – that is, doing something good for someone else at your own detriment – only occurs because of genetic favoritism.

This theory, primarily promoted by W. D. Hamilton in the 1960s, explains this behavior from the perspective of the gene and its need to replicate. The gene that promotes the desire to help other family members aids its own replication because it will help the spread of individuals bearing copies of that gene.

In other words, birds will feed the young of relatives in order to increase the number of their shared genes in future generation.

Back scratching
The other face of this theory is the ‘helper’ idea –that an animal that offers itself as a helper increases its own chances of survival and future reproduction or ensures the survival of the family.
 
For instance, the white-fronted African bee eater will fight snakes and other predators, forage for food for its relatives and put off having its own young to help its close relatives raise their own young.

Helping is also a means of propagating the gene.

Finally, there is the ‘I’ll-scratch-your-back theory’:  a chimp will groom another chimp only because he’s fully expecting reciprocity.

This seemed a neat and tidy theory encapsulating virtually all of the altruism seen in the animal kingdom – from grooming, and vigilance, to babysitting and cooperative hunting.

And then along came the baby chimp study. 

In this study, carried out in 2006, Felix Warneken, of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, decided to design an experiment to test altruism with no expectation of reward and no intended evolutionary advantage, among both chimps and 18-month-old babies,

Monkey see, monkey do
In the study, Warneken asked a researcher unknown to both chimps and babies to place a wooden stick or a pen beyond his own reach, but not that of the chimps or toddlers. 

Warneken then tried four different types of tests with each individual chimp or baby.  Sometimes the stranger would simply reach for the stick or pen, and other times he’d just look at it.  In a portion of those instances, he’d offer a reward of a banana (for the chimps) or a toy (for the toddlers) if they’d helped him get the object in question.

The hypothesis, said Warneken, was that if the toddlers and chimps were more responsive to the stranger’s goal (getting the stick or pen), they’d be more likely to hand the pen to him when he reached for it than when he just looked for it. 

If they were mostly interested in their own benefit in the situation, they’d be most likely to reach for the pen or stick when they knew they were going to get a reward.

The expectation, according to current biological theory, was that the toddler or chimp would be more likely to help if there was something in it for him or her.

Helpful babies
The experimental results confounded that theory.  Twelve of the 18 chimps and 16 of the 18 toddlers reached for the stick and handed it to the stranger, when he reached for it — regardless of whether they were given a reward. 

“This indicates that subjects were motivated to help the experimenter with his/her unachieved goal . . . but did not aim at retrieving a material reward for themselves,” the scientists noted with interest in their report.

“Rewarding their helping was unnecessary,” they added, “and did not even raise the rate of helping in either case.”

Then Warneken and his colleagues raised the stakes.  They placed the stick in a more out-of-the-way spot.  In order to retrieve it, the participants had to engage in Herculean acts: in the case of chimps, run along an elevated “raceway” or, in the case of the toddlers, scramble over a blockade barrier. 

Nevertheless, in this instance, both groups demonstrated a selfless desire to help.

Selfless chimps
There could be the possibility that the animals and babies were simply trying to please a more dominant individual (i.e., an adult human).  So the German scientists decided to test whether chimps would put themselves out for other chimps.  Other studies testing this impulse had been inconclusive; sometimes the test chimps helped, other times they didn’t.

They weren’t conclusively spiteful (that is, deliberately keeping the other chimps from getting the food), just not conclusively interested in helping. In the past, the primary concern always seemed to be whether they could get hold of the food for themselves.

So, in this study, the scientists removed the personal reward possibility, by setting up a situation with food inside a room with the door chained shut.  The test chimps could see this and were also able to witness a stranger chimp trying to get the door open without success.

An extraordinary 89 per cent of the time, the chimps tried to help them out – even though there was nothing in it for them.

Favoring the weakling
Other evidence, from the Leverhulme Centre for Human Evolutionary Studies at the University of Cambridge, suggests that animal bonds are not always made for personal advantage. 

In this study they were examining affiliations with third-party members after a conflict between two members of a group. 

They discovered in many instances, as expected, that the third party would affiliate himself with the tough-guy, more aggressive individual, and thereby protect himself from a future run-in with him.

However, in other instances, the third-party would side with the 98-pound weakling in the conflict, rather than the bully, particularly if it were his own kin. 

So if chimps are happy to help without reward or side with the loser – which would suggest an individual who was naturally less fit – doesn’t this make a monkey out of current arguments about altruism? 

Bee Blog

 

Did Darwin Kill God?

I’m back again, after a long weekend catching the first spring sun and the pageantry of Palm Sunday in Sicily. 

Just before I left, I caught a fascinating documentary on the BBC entitled, ‘Did Darwin Kill God?’ that seems particularly pertinent to contemplate this Easter weekend.

The documentary was written and presented by philosopher and theologian Conor Cunningham of the University of Nottingham, and it was a refreshing look at what Darwin really wrote, and whether it is at odds with a theory of God. 

Cunningham aimed to examine in detail the received wisdom about Darwinism: that the theory of evolution must ultimately undermine religion and serve as ultimate refutation of the notion of God.

Although the documentary is no longer on the BBC site, the hour-long show, divided into six parts, has now been posted on YouTube. There’s also an excellent interview with Cunningham on his own University of Nottingham site:http://www.theologyphilosophycentre.co.uk/
War of extremes
In the documentary, Cunningham, author of a new book called Evolution: Darwin’s Pious Idea, takes the line that the culture war that now exists between scientific atheists like Dan Dennett, on the one hand, and Christian fundamentalists, on the other, is essentially a divide of two equally extremist groups, both of which have ignored history, science and philosophical argument.

Indeed, their hijacking of Darwin’s theories, and reasons for support or denunciation of them, bear little resemblance to Darwin’s original thesis – or indeed, to the scientific or historical evidence.

Cunningham traveled around the world, interviewing eminent Biblical scholars, historians and scientists, to unearth the roots of Creationism and its opposition to Darwinism, i.e., that the seven-day creation of the universe, as described in Genesis, should be accepted as literal fact.  He then deconstructs the theories of the Ultra-Darwinists, who believe that natural selection applies to all aspects of life, including our culture.

The selfish meme
Many scientists, such as Susan Blackmore (The Meme Machine) and Richard Dawkins, advance what has been called ‘Universal Darwinism,’ through the theory of ‘memes’.  This theory proposes that all human belief and endeavor, from popular culture to religion and morality – indeed, any information that can be copied from person to person with variation and selection – is a form of natural selection. 

As Blackmore put it, “ Memes are competing to use our brains to get themselves copied.” 

According to Universal Darwinists, everything, including our sense of self, is an illusion – the simple result of our being colonized by memes. 
 
Cunningham’s position is that Christian fundamentalists demonstrate a complete lack of understanding of Christian belief and tradition, in that many Biblical scholars, from St Augustine onward, encouraged Christian followers to understand Genesis as having metaphorical, not literal truth.

Indeed, Darwin himself did not believe his theories to be inconsistent with belief in God.

As for the Ultra-Darwinists, says Cunningham, their view – that all aspects of culture and belief, as well as genes, are evolutionary – cheapens natural selection as a true science. 

It also shoots itself in the foot.  If there is no final truth to anything – if it is all a contagion of ideas, whether true or not true, and the only point is that an idea survives, whether true or not  – then how do we know evolution has any truth to it? Or is it simply another popular meme, not substantially different than a catchy pop song? 

Explosive evidence
For me, the most fascinating and thought-provoking aspect of the show had to do with evidence provided almost parenthetically.  Cunningham traveled to Washington D.C. to meet with Francis Collins, who’d been director of the Human Genome Project between 1993-2008.  Collins emphasized that our current understanding of the gene as the Renaissance man of human evolution is fast going out of date. 

“A gene is just a packet of DNA,’ he says, ‘We don’t even quite know what the boundary is of that packet anymore.’

While working on the Genome Project, says Collins, he finally learned how few genes are present in the human body.

“First of all, came the shock that we didn’t have as many genes as we thought we did.  People had been saying 100,000 for a long time.  It’s probably only about 20,000, now that the dust has really settled.”

Even more astonishing was the evidence that human beings, supposedly the most complex organisms on the planet, don’t have as many genes as most things.  A grain of rice, for instance, has some 49,000 genes – nearly twice as much as the average person.

Universal music?
Cunningham went on to speak with Simon Conway Morris, from the University of Cambridge, who is one of the world’s pre-eminent evolutionary paleobiologists. Morris’s specialty is to study how divergent life forms with entirely independent evolutionary paths produce markedly similar results.  

What fascinates him, for instance, is the universal need for and form of music. 

“Animals,” he says, “have music remarkably similar to ours.  Some birds have drumming, for example, plus harmony, melody and invention just like ours.” 

There are even cultures of music, he says; in the oceans, for instance, whales swap songs. 

The presence of, and similarity between, the music produced by species of such disparity suggests that there is a ‘universal music’ out there — in which case, says Morris, evolution is more akin to a search engine. ‘

In that case, each species is “actually discovering something which arguably is even pre-existing.”

Beyond evolution
Both of these comments are revelatory, in terms of our current understanding of life. 

If human beings are supposed to be the most complex life form on the planet, and yet our genomes are half the size of that of a grape, then the gene cannot be the primary instrument of complexity and adaptation.

And if utterly diverse species of living things have universal commonalities that cannot be explained by natural selection, each species may ultimately evolve by tapping into a universal force or intelligence – a Field of information. 

As Morris puts it: “The very fact that music is discovered in this way suggests that . . .in fact we’ve hardly begun to understand who we are and why we’re here.”

As Conor Cunningham reminds us toward the end of the documentary, all science is provisional.  Newtonian physics was ‘true’ until it was amended by general relativity, and then amended again by quantum mechanics.

 “The question isn’t, is evolution true?” says Morris. “The question is: is evolution as a theory complete?  It’s as true as far as it goes, but we are very much dealing with unfinished business.”

Cunningham, the model of an intelligent inquiring theologian, defines God as “the source of life . . . he in whom we live, move and have in our very existence.” 

Nevertheless, he uses a theory like evolution, he says, as a reminder — to  “stop my understanding of God from becoming too domestic, too cozy, too small”. 

The question should not be whether Darwin killed God.  The question we should be asking is whether God – that is, the magnitude of the central intelligence being tapped into, including the science we periodically download to explain ourselves  – has in fact killed Darwin.

Intention of the week

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              Intention of the Week - Bruce Mclaren
                                Help to heal his lung cancer
                                April 12, 2009 - 5pm GMT

Bruce McLaren, who lives in San Diego, California, has developed small cell lung cancer, which has recently metastasized to various parts of his body. He is currently receiving chemotherapy. The disease was discovered in January last year and was thought to be limited.  At that time, he received radiotherapy to the right lung, followed by Cisplatin chemotherapy.  

A recurrence was found last summer, and he underwent further radiation treatment to the right femur and spine, plus two different courses of chemotherapy, Topotecan and then Taxol.

 The latest PET scan shows that the cancer has spread, and there’s now evidence of cancer on his left femur, in his abdomen and on his spinal cord. None of these treatments appear to have worked in arresting the spread of the cancer, and he is currently on CAV (Cyclophosphamide Adriamycin, Vincristine).  No further radiation is possible.  

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All for one and one for all

This week, I read about a fascinating study about bumblebees carried out by Dr. Andy Gardner of the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Edinburgh.  Gardner studies Darwinian adaptation, which to date has been believed to occur at the level of the individual organism.

Gardner, on the other hand, has been studying whether there is such a thing as group adaptation and ‘super organisms’ — where a particular species of animals operates only as a collective — so much so it can be seen to exist as a single organism in its own right. 

Recently, Gardiner and his colleagues from Edinburgh and also Oxford University, put together the first theory of group adaptation after using mathematical models to examine what is known as ‘swarm behavior’ to see how individual animals act in relation to the group. 

A model community
With some animals, they believe, what appears to be swarming is simply each individual jostling to get to the middle of the group to evade predators.

Bees and ants, on the other hand, are different. Both operate what could be considered a model community.  In this instance, individuals continuously act selflessly and are willing to sacrifice and even die if necessary to protect the colony. 

One example, he says, is the policing that goes on in hives.  Any egg not laid by the queen is destroyed by worker bees, to ensure that only the queen's offspring survive.  In that sense, the entire community is united in a common purpose. In countless other ways, bees will happily die in order to aid the community in some way. 

Gardner’s view is that the group dynamic carries on because the bees within any particular colony are mostly relatives of each other and so are simply hardwired by a biological evolutionary imperative – to ensure that queen survives in order to pass on their genes. 

But is that the only reason?

Smart machines?
To the scientific community, an animal is still perceived as nothing much more than a robot with an array of chemical processes, without the ability to register much more than the crudest pain or fear—certainly none of the more complicated human cognition or feelings such as excitement, boredom, annoyance, anger or suspicion.

A variation of this theme is the suggestion that animals have a kind of ‘animal consciousness’ that is far less sophisticated than ours.

As one beekeeper put it recently, summing up the prevailing view: “I have found the bee to be a charming, complex but not terribly smart little machine.”

Only Charles Darwin, ironically, maintained that animals have sophisticated emotions — a theory that, unlike his views on evolution, never caught fire. Mark S. Blumberg, of the University of Iowa, and Greta Sokoloff, of Indiana University in Bloomington, number among the most vocal proponents of the behaviorist view, claiming that the idea that animals process emotion is pure fiction and ‘anthropomorphic’.

Smart bees
However, a recent study of insect intelligence being carried out by Dr. Nigel Raine at Queen Mary, University of London, shows that bees are highly intelligent – as intelligent as rats and pigeons, for instance - capable of extraordinary feats of navigation, making use of trigonometry and landmark recognition. 

In fact, the London research now shows a hierarchy of intelligence, with some bees innately more clever than others, and able to learn memory tasks and retain information far more quickly. 

Dr. Raine’s research conclusively demonstrates that bees show the ability to learn with great nuance, discerning complex patterns, shapes, colors, textures and scents.   Raine has also discovered that they can even recognize human faces and make complex calculations about food supplies.

Random acts of self-sacrifice
Although bees may have evolved to be unselfish in the extreme, this may be less of an anomaly than we think. Copious evidence in neuroscience and biology demonstrates that a drive for cooperation and partnership, even sacrifice, rather than selfishness and naked survival, is fundamental to the biological makeup of all living things. Far from being born to be  “robot survival machines” shaped by the survival imperative of their genes, both animals and human beings are hardwired for empathy and altruism.

Animal champions such as Jeffrey Masson have amassed hundreds of astonishing cases demonstrating that animals routinely engage in what Gloria Steinem once referred to as ‘random acts’ of self-sacrifice, compassion, courage and generosity toward members of their own species, members of other species and even toward humans, often to their own detriment.

Although Masson’s work has been discounted as anecdotal, the hundreds of individual case studies from him and other scientists compound into a convincing argument that animals are capable of extraordinary self-sacrifice.

Animals routinely evidence moments in which they put aside the most fundamental drive of all: the need to eat. In innumerable instances, Masson and McCarthy have discovered instances where animals have shared food or ensured that weaker individuals in a pack or herd be fed, even if it means giving up their own food. This occurs even in species like red foxes, known for jealously guarding their own catch.

Evolved beyond conflict
Rather than mindless drones, following in step, it could be that bees are highly intelligent creatures that have somehow evolved to avoid conflict for the sake of the whole. 

Nevertheless, a ‘superorganism’ —with as advanced a social organization as bees or ants — is quite rare, and can only exist when the international conflict within a social group has been eliminated or suppressed. 

That is why, says Dr. Gardner,  “we cannot use this term, for example, to describe human societies.”

This evidence about bee intelligence and behavior particularly interests me because bees, as you may know, are disappearing in great numbers.  All over the developed world, honey bees are disappearing, suffering from what scientists term Colony Collapse Disorder, where the entire community mysteriously just disappears. 

There is no evidence of dead bodies lying around – just an inexplicably empty hive that has been left behind.

Can it be that bees collectively decide that it is wise to up sticks and go because they are smart enough to figure out that their environment is electrically and chemically polluted?  

So tell me that’s the decision of a dumb animal. 

 

intention of the week

Christine Egilson

 

 

 Help to heal her bladder cancer

March 22, 2009

5 pm GMT

 

Christine Egilson, 35 year old pf Winnipeg, Canada, mother of a two year old, received devastating news in January that she has bladder cancer, which has spread to her left knee, right hip and lungs.  She has been forced to close her chiropractic business, and has undergone treatment offered through the Canadian medical system.  Unfortunately, the doctors there offered her radiation but little hope. Through her chiropractic community she learned of alternative cancer treatments in Mexico, and left in late February to commence them.

 

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“My intention is for Christine Egilson to be free of all cancer and to be healthy and well in every way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Where have you gone, Woodward and Bernstein?

Most people are under the mistaken impression that I’m a scientist.  In actual fact, I am a strange hybrid of a writer, with an interest in science and spirituality, but the heart and soul of an investigator reporter.

As a teenager, what clinched the deal for me about becoming a journalist was witnessing the fall of Richard Nixon.  Here were Woodward and Bernstein, two young and inexperienced Washington Post journalists, who nevertheless were able to bring down a corrupt presidency through old-style, tireless, gumshoe-leather reporting.

That experience imbued in me an appreciation of the power of the so-called Fourth Estate.  It seemed to me that every journalist – indeed, every publication – carried a weighty responsibility to provide a check on the the twin monoliths of politics and commerce. 

Nevertheless, it’s a state of mind fast disappearing from the job spec these days.

America’s low ranking
Reporters Without Borders, a worldwide organization devoted to press freedom, publishes an annual Press Freedom Index, which rates the comparative levels of free expression in countries around the globe.

The other day, I was stunned to learn where America ranks on that chart, having tumbled badly during the last presidential regime, when it became unpatriotic for the press to question or even to look into anything the administration was up to.

In 2006, America sat at 53th place, well beaten by the likes of Bosnia, El Salvador and Panama. 

In the latest report, the US has recovered a bit domestically, but is still in 36th place — behind Costa Rica and Ghana. Outside its own borders, the US ranks at 119th place for protecting its press freedom and even its own journalists.

The UK’s press, at 23, sits well below most former satellite states of the Soviet Union, sharing pride of place with Namibia.

The ranking of Western democracies for press freedom is fast being overtaken by that of new countries. While Europe has an excellent showing, France and Japan have made a notable tumble down the charts, and now fare worse than many small Caribbean countries. 

Of the European countries, Scandinavia emerges as the freest press, with Norway sharing first places with Iceland, and Finland and the Netherlands close behind, at 2 and 3 respectively.

New scientific story
I bring this up because I’m part of an Evolutionary Leaders Council – a group started by Deepak Chopra – the purpose of which is to gather together a large number of so-called thought leaders, who can work collectively and in small groups to shift the consciousness of the planet.  Since our first retreat this summer, we’ve been meeting regularly by phone — with another, longer retreat planned this summer.

New biologist Bruce Lipton and I have recently been given the job of leading a group to discuss ways to promote education of the new scientific story and what it means to our health. We want to widely circulate many of the new ideas about physics and biology, which show that our bodies are far more than a collection of linear processes and chemical reactions. 

We’d like to publicize the evidence that the body is a holistic system, in which reactions largely occur globally, as this new scientific story will have a major impact on which health-care systems are actually effective. 

It’s now clear even to most doctors that our current medical model, with its reliance on drugs and surgery, is not working.  According to the Journal for the American Medical Association, correctly prescribed drugs are now the third leading cause of death in America, only a whisker behind heart attacks and stroke.

Dynamic web of connection
German physicist Fritz Albert Popp, who first discovered that living things a tiny current of light (biophoton emissions), has discovered evidence showing that when medication is placed on the one part of the body, a large change in the number of light emissions occurs not only from where the ointment has been applied, but also from distant parts of the body. 

Furthermore, the size of the changes correlate all over the body: even those places where no ointment had been applied record the same increase in light emissions as from the spot where the medicine has been rubbed in.  

This is one tiny bit of the vast amount of evidence suggesting that our body is a dynamical system that operates within a web of connection. It also tells us why the tools of modern medicine often have such blunderbuss effects.  Even if a therapy is intended for a specific location, this communications channel will cause it to affect the body globally.

But how to get this information out to the general public?
Bombarded by Big Pharma
Every time I return to America, what hits me in the face is the sheer number of pharmaceutical ads allowed to be promoted on television. Ads for drugs to treat virtually every manner of condition on the morning news. Direct-to-teenage-consumer ads, attempting to convince 12 years olds to pester their parents to get the Gardisal vaccine – lest they face the risk of dying of cancer. There are even ads now for pet drugs, designed to prey upon the emotional ties of dog owners. 

Those ads and the overriding financial considerations they represent may have something to do with the fact that important stories about health and science often don’t see the light of day.

By way of example, my husband Bryan, also a journalist, was recently stunned to discover evidence that a large consignment of Baxter International’s seasonal flu vaccine, due to be circulated to 18 European countries, had been infected with the deadly live avian flu virus. 

Had this contamination not been detected, the vaccines may have set off an avian flu pandemic, with hundreds of thousands of casualties. (see our news pages, on our website WDDTY).

A headline grabber – in Czechoslovakia
This only came to light when a Czech researcher, who’d made the discovery by accident, fed the story to the Czech papers, which promptly published it (Czechoslovakia is way up there, at number 5 now).

At that point, the story should have been picked up and splashed across the front pages of the world’s newspapers.  In fact, almost no paper carried it – other than the Toronto Star in Canada (now number 13). 

America’s and the UK’s press stayed conspicuously silent.

For us to get out the new scientific story and the important ways that this impacts on your health care, it may be that we will have to bypass the giant corporate conglomerates who now own the media.

We may have to tell this story directly to each other. 

Pass this blog on to everyone you know. Tell them what you know about the new science and the fundamental problems of our current medical solutions. Complain to the newspapers about the poor state of Western reporting on new science and health care, and demand something more than celebrity spotting. 

Woodward and Bernstein – where are you?

 

Intention of the Week

Axel Clivet

 

 

 Help to heal his brain tumor

March 15, 2009

5 pm GMT

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This is our second Intention of the Week for little Axel Clivet of Labarde, France, which we first ran 18 months ago.  Axel, who just turned 5 in January, suffers from ganglioglioma (grade I), which had been causing headaches and balance problems.

 

Last year they operated on Axel, but only removed part of the tumor, because they couldn’t completely distinguish it from healthy brain cells.  This operation helped him to recover most of his normal function.  Nevertheless, his balance isn’t perfect, and he needs to wear sunglasses in bright sunlight.  A latest scan showed a secondary tumor from the cells of the primary tumor.  Because they feel it is difficult to operate, they are considering chemo or radiation therapy. 

 

The tumor has been stable for over a year (since our Intention for him), and still hasn’t moved.  A tumor of 2 by 3 cm is still stuck between the brain stem and the other lobes of his brain. 

 

Axel is a gentle little boy who loves Judo, videogames (like MarioKart), Power Rangers, Spiderman and books. 

 

His mother Debbie writes:  “He lightens up our days.  Like many sick children, my son also developed a social awareness and kindness that many adults can also learn from. He shows us every day that life is cool and that bad things don’t have to mess up your life.  He’s a source of inspiration. 

 

“We would really appreciate it if Axel could be Intention of the week.  Last time, this did him so much good.”

 

Please join in this Sunday at 5 pm GMT. 

 

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You are what your grandmother played with

I ordinarily don’t like to report on animal studies largely because my blood boils over when I hear of the unspeakable things that scientists do to animals in the name of research. And of course all that slicing and dicing is oftentimes done for no good reason because you cannot always apply the results to human beings. 

But I’m going to tell you about several little mice studies because if their results are shown to have a parallel application to human beings, they upend just about everything that orthodox scientists say about our biology.

DNA – the master switch?
The most favored idea about human mind and body is that there exists a genetic ‘program’ of genes operating collectively to determine our health and longevity. In this view, DNA holds the master switch to selectively turn off and on certain genes and choose certain RNA molecules, which in turn select from a large alphabet of amino acids the genetic ‘words’ that create specific proteins, which ultimately control every bodily function, including intelligence and every aspect of health, including longevity. 

In the simplest terms, according to this view, genetics is destiny.

Epigeneticists like my dear friend Bruce Lipton argue against this view that we are virtually programmed by our genes, with new evidence that the master builder of living things is not a cell’s genetic programming; our cells, our gene expression and therefore our entire organism is largely shaped by environmental influences.

Alzheimer’s mice
As you probably know, scientists know how to manipulate genes, so that certain ones can be turned on or off (or ‘knocked out’, as they indelicately put it). Recently a researcher called Li-Huei Tsai with a team from Howard Hughes Medical Institute at Massachusetts Institute of Technology selectively bred a group of mice with something akin to Alzheimer’s disease — the presence of a certain protein that causes degeneration of neurons in the brain.

Animals like this have profoundly impaired learning and memory, and impaired long-term potentiation (LTP), a crucial cellular process in memory.  In very short order, after signs of brain atrophy and loss of neurons, these mice become demented.

Up until now, scientists have believed this genetic coding to be firmly fixed, operating through a cascade of processes – of proteins affecting other proteins and then amino acids, like a game of dominoes – which ultimately lead to switching on (or not) of connections between neurons.

In the study, Tsai subjected the mice to two tasks, both designed to test memory and ability to learn. The first was to study whether they were capable of ‘fear conditioning’ – where the animals would have to undergo a task that ordinarily would cause them to associate going into a specific chamber with receiving a mild electric shock. In the second test, the mice had to find a submerged platform in a tank of murky water.

Ordinarily, a fear-conditioning situation produces a long-term memory of the event; once we burn our hands on the stove, we know forever after to steer clear of a gas flame. Nevertheless, this group of mice failed both tests; their brains appeared to have atrophied to the point where they could not learn from an unpleasant experience or indeed anything, like their murky water test, requiring memory storage.

Action-packed environment
Impressed by studies showing that an ‘enriched environment’ can improve learning capability, Tsai wanted to test whether the same was the case in an animal who’d already suffered brain degeneration.

This time, she placed her mice population in an action-packed environment, containing new mice, an exercise treadmill, and a variety of bright and different shaped and textured toys, which were changed every day.

To their amazement, once the researchers again tested the animals with the tasks, the mice who’d been stimulated showed marked improvement over animals without the additional stimulation.

When Tsai and her colleagues studied the brains of these animals after their deaths, she discovered that this environmental stimulation actually had altered a part of cellular proteins and chemical tags, which finally turns on or off certain genes. 

The environment overrode the genetic blueprint.  Genes were not destiny.  

A recent study carried out by Larry Feig and his research team from Sackler School of biomedical Sciences at Tufts University extended this idea – to see whether an educational environment could override genes in very young mice with certain major neural handicaps.

Knock-out genes
This time, Feig and his team they’d knocked out the Ras-GRF genes in a group of baby mice. Without this gene, a mouse again has cellular processing critical for memory and learning, and poor synaptic efficiency in the brain, leading to poor information storage. 

Mice without this gene again cannot learn fear. Put them in a potentially unpleasant situation they’ve already experienced, provide the stimulus that should set off a memory of the event, and they won’t have the foggiest memory of it.

This time, the researchers exposed the 15-day-old mice to the equivalent of a indoor theme park designed for novel stimulation: a large cage with play tubes, cardboard boxes, a running wheel, and both toys and nesting material that were all changed or rearranged every other day.

Compensation in the brain
After two weeks, Feig discovered that in this enriched environment, the mice developed a compensatory brain switch, which switched on new pathway that works with with Ras-GRF proteins to help in long-term memory and learning.  Even though they had this gene ‘knocked out’, a stimulating environment in a sense turned it back on.  The mice showed evidence of normal memory and fear conditioning. 

Feig then took this one stage further and examined what happened to their offspring – even though they were given a normal environment, rather than a theme park. 

Astonishingly, the offspring of these mice showed evidence of normal memory and learning ability – even though they themselves had had no additional stimulation and should have inherited the turned-off gene. 

The environmental effect of their ancestors again overrode their genetic destiny. 

If they can be applied to humans (always a big if), the implications of these studies are just extraordinary (and not surprisingly have gained the attention of organizations working with Alzheimer’s disease).

Stimulation and connection
They suggest that connection between a living thing and its world, in the form of social interaction and a constantly stimulating and renewing environment, can be the most potent healer  - even of brain damage or genetic birth ‘defect’.

This is supported by enormous evidence of human centenarians showing that those who lived longest had two important aspects:  a strong connection, socially and spiritually, and a continued curiosity about the new.

The studies also suggest the most radical idea of all:  a mother’s environmental influences will influence the genetic expression of her children. If her environment was constantly stimulating and social, then this will have a bigger effect on her children than their genetic heritage.

It may well be that you are what your grandmother played with.

This sounds to me suspiciously like a Field effect.

Intention of the week

Nabel Yoself  

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March 8, 2009

5 pm GMT

 

 Help her to find her soul mate and fulfilling work

This week we’re departing from our usual intention to heal a physical illness.  Nabel, one of my lovely vivacious hosts last week in Kuwait, is 40 and lives in Kuwait City. 

She is making many changes in her life, and would like to find a perfect soul mate and also soul work that is fulfilling but also financially rewarding. She asked me to have my community help with a special intention.

 

‘My intention is for Nabel Yoself to find her perfect soul mate and work consistent with her life’s divine purpose.’

 

 

 Next week:  Conversations on the Frontier

 

At the moment, I am speaking with many frontier scientists as I gather material for my next book. Next week we’ll be launching regular Conversations on the Frontier podcasts, where I’ll share the highlights of these conversations with you, so stay tuned.

 

See the movie, and then join its ‘stars’

 

I also wanted to remind you one final time, if you’re within striking distance of London, of the UK premiere of the Living Matrix, the new movie about the science of energy healing, which features Edgar Mitchell, Bruce Lipton, me and many other scientists and healers.  It’s showing on Friday, March 13 at King’s college auditorium, and for just £10 you’ll have the opportunity, to see the movie and attend a wine and cheese reception to meet the filmmakers and many of the conference speakers who appear in the movie.

For more details, click here.

 

The following day, I and a host of others from the movie will be presenting information about the Science of Intention at the two- day conference, and following it up with a workshop on Monday.

 

For more information or reserve your space at the conference, click here, and to attend my half day workshop, click here.

 

 

Have a good week.

 

Warm wishes,

 

Lynne McTaggart

 

 

 

 

Less than zero

One of the most frustrating problems faced by physicists is the fact that the quantum world cannot be observed as it really exists – in its multiple state, called ‘superposition’ – without its being disturbed.  Instead of being a billiard ball of certainty, every quantum particle exists as a cloud of probability.

At its most elemental, the smallest units of life actually aren’t an anything yet, but a self in the process of becoming. In fact, in a pure quantum state, this ‘self’ is collection of all possible future selves all at the same time, like an endlessly replicated chain of paper dolls.

The observer effect

The only thing that appears to dissolve this cloud of probability into something solid and measurable is living observation. In this strange twilight world, where everything exists in a gelatinous goo of all possible states, the very act of measuring or observing reduces the quantum particle to one particular state, referred to as ‘collapsing’ the wave function. 

Take the tiniest peek at an electron, and you reduce it to a single state.  Take the quickest measurement about where it’s heading, and you end up with just one direction. 

By noticing or weighing or calculating, you create what we think of as the ‘real’ world – a storehouse full of set somethings  - but you also affect what it is you’re observing and so cannot observe the world in its ‘pure’ state without your influence.

The shadow self

Every type of particle has its shadow self in the form of antimatter or an antiparticle, which behaves just like its corresponding ‘positive’ variety except with an opposite charge. So for every quark there is an antiquark, for every electron a positron. Should the two ever meet, and be observed doing so, they simply combine and implode, so that the superficial appearance of an entity reverts to indeterminate, unspecified energy. 

The observer effect suggests that our reality is ‘participatory’ – that we are utterly intrinsic to the creation of reality as we know it Nevertheless, our inability to objectively observe the undisturbed quantum state (or ‘pre-world’ of pure potential) has severely limited our understanding of quantum physics  - until recently, when Japanese and Canadian researchers were both able to independently confirm something called Hardy’s paradox.

In 1990 an Oxford physicist called Lucien Hardy devised a very strange thought experiment.  Through the use of a gadget called an ‘interferometer’, he imagined an electron hitting a mirror, which creates a superposition, causing the particle to travel down two arms of the device at the same time.  The two versions of the particle are then reunited and hit another half-silvered mirror, positioned so that, if the electron has been undisturbed during its travels through the interferometer, it will be collected in detector ‘C’.  If it has been disturbed it is sent to detector ‘D’.

Hardy thought up a situation where he’d have two such interferometers positioned so that one arm of each would overlap.  He then imagined firing a positron (an electron’s antiparticle) in one, and an electron in the other.  At one point of their multiple journeys, they should meet in the central overlapping region and annihilate each other.  However, according to Hardy, as these particles exist in multiple states, if unobserved, the two particles could meet, so to speak, but fail to wipe each other out.

But as no one is able to observe this state of affairs, it remains unconfirmed, which is why it is usually referred to as ‘Hardy’s paradox’. (Physicists are fond of weird unobservable ‘unequalities’ and ‘paradoxes’.)

A sideways peek

Several years ago, Yakir Aharonov, a prestigious physicist at the Quantum Group at Tel Aviv University, discovered a means to observe this kind of quantum standoff through a thought experiment that would imagine detectors that would measure so weakly (that is, take such a weak sideways glance) at the particles that they would not collapse its superposition state. 

The particles would be remain in several places at once – both in the place where they’d meet and annihilate each other and then in other arms at the same time.  Because the measurements were so weak, the scientists would not gather enough information about them to be able to pinpoint the electrons to a set state, but by carrying out the experiment multiple times, they could pool the results and produce results that are more or less accurate.  

In this week’s issue of the New Journal of Physics, Kazuhiro Yokota of Osaka University in Japan carried out such an experiment with a pair of entangled photons, or particles of light, as did researchers at the University of Toronto (published two months ago in Physical Review Letters).

What both groups discovered about the state of reality is even stranger than the most farsighted quantum physicist could imagine.

No there there

In this case, as Aharonov predicted, certain of the photons recorded were less than zero (or -1).  Although that would usually indicate the presence of antiparticles, there are no such things with photons. The photons themselves must have some sort of negative presence.

Yokota and his colleagues called the results “preposterous’.  ‘This gives us new insights into the spooky action of quantum mechanics,’ wrote Yokota cautiously.

But in Aharonov’s view, this may mean that the quantum world is a whole lot stranger than we thought, and that parts of particles can exist as a shadow  – they can be there, but not be there. 

Or, it could be that without us, and our consciousness, life is less than zero.

What lends any electron a final identity is our presence as a co-creator.

The simple fact is that nothing, finally, exists independently. What our subatomic world teaches us is that matter cannot be understood in isolation but only in relationship, a complex web of relationships, forever indivisible.

 

Intention of the week

Mohammed Aslam   

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March 1, 2009

5 pm GMT 

Help to slow the onset of Alzheimer’s disease

 

Our reader and community member Sohail Aslam wrote in to say that her father, who will be 70 on April 17, 2009, has been diagnosed with the onset of Alzheimer’s.  Sohail noticed that some of the symptoms of the disease have slowed down. He has recently moved to Pakistan from the US.  

Help to heal his Alzheimer’s with the following intention:

 “My intention is that Mohammed Aslam be free of all symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease and to be healthy and well in every way.”

A revolution in healing

Be sure not to miss The Living Matrix: The Science of Healing Conference at Kings College, London from Friday 13th to Monday 16th March.

Designed for alternative health practitioners, researchers, scientists or anyone those interested in alternative healthcare, the conference offers a great deal of new ideas about complementary medicine. You will see the premier of The Living Matrix film www.thelivingmatrixmovie.com, and hear and network with many leading edge researchers and  health practitioners and

Besides appearing in the new film The Living Matrix I will be speaking at the two-day Science of Healing Conference and running a one-day workshop. I’ll be joined by James Oschman, Rollin McCraty, Eric Pearl and many other frontier researchers and practitioners of healing.

Secure your place at the Science of Healing Conference by registering here. For more about my own workshop, click here. Remember, this is your last chance to book before 1st March and receive your 5 per cent discount  by quoting promotional code LMC310.

 

 

 

In the heart of the heart of the country

Earlier this week I ran my first two-day Living with Intention workshop in a non-English speaking country.  Although I’ve spoken in countries all over the world, what distinguished this workshop from all my other speaking engagements was my audience, a large percentage of whom observed me and all I had to say through the thin slits of their black, all encasing burqas. 

Last year, I’d been persuaded to run my first workshop in the Middle East through an organization called the Al Rashed Center in Kuwait. One of the regular attendees of our conferences for many years was Salah Al Rashed, who has a human development center in Kuwait and daily radio show and a television show distributed all over the Arab speaking countries. He’d been a fan of my work for many years, and although my books are not yet out in Arabic, his constant reference to my work has familiarized it to that part of the world.

A new experience

Although I had been prepared for several traditionalists in the audience, I had expected the country or anyone interested in my message to be Westernized. I was utterly unprepared for what transpired.  Although I’d met my host Salah Al Rashed during a trip to England, when he was dressed in ordinary shirt and tie, on his home turf, he and his wife Sarah, greeted me at the airport in traditional keffiyeh (red tea-towel style headdress a la Yassir Arafat) and white bisht in his case, and full black burqa, complete with veil, in hers.

This, I realized with some uneasiness, was going to be a very different two days for me.
I was careful to run through all the cultural faux pas that I could make with my host and hostess  - don’t shake hands with men, unless they shake with you, don’t have mixed intention groups -  and as we rode to the hotel venue, I made a mental inventory of the wardrobe I’d brought along.  Although I’d brought along modest, loose long clothing and even toyed with the idea of wearing a headscarf as a sign of respect, the following morning I eschewed it.  They were obviously going to be authentic, and so would I be.

A different audience

The following morning, when I headed to the front of the room, I surveyed my audience with something akin to alarm.   All the women had coalesced on the left side of the room and all the men on the right.  As Al Rashed’s radio show had huge reach throughout the Arabic countries, they’d come from all over the Middle East and the gulf: Saudis and Emirates and Egyptians and Kuwaitis and even a smattering of Indians and Pakistanis. 

Most of the women were covered, to some degree, but in an entire spectrum of possibility, from full burqa allowing only eyeslits, to black headscarves, to very colorful abayas, to ordinary Western gear.  The men, in the main, had little variation on the same theme -  two colors of keffiyeh  and long black or white jalabiya robes. 

Both sides of the room looked up at me expectedly. My interpreter was a young woman from Syria, a region decidedly unfriendly to my home country of America. 

I stared at the surreal image before me in an uneasy silence.  What had I let myself in for?  What would these people, for whom tradition played such a central role, think of my radical material? How would any of this square with their religious and cultural beliefs?

Any apprehension soon dissipated as we began discussing quantum physics and intention.  They took careful notes and followed any instructions enthusiastically and to the letter.  Most of the audience had seen The Secret and read The Law of Attraction.  Although the men remained with men and the women with women, they were happy to participate in experiments and to form small close-knit groups to send healing intention to each other.  Their intuitive abilities were finely honed during our experiments.  Clearly they were used to tapping into The Field.

And after practicing psychic ability and intention, when we broke for lunch, they made a nod to tradition, and a large group of male Saudis positioned themselves to the south, bent over on the floor and prayed.

The biggest student

For my part, I spent the two days being the biggest student in the room.  Had the clothing been a matter of choice? Did it work – was there less rape and other abuse of women?  How did religion square with any other modern ideas?  Were women allowed careers (there were many women doctors in the audience and a goodly percentage held professional jobs)? Was the clothing more comfortable for men? 

And then my questions became more pointed. How would they solve the problem of terrorism, or the Israeli conflict? What should America and Britain do now to prevent future terrorism and promote peace? Where had the US gone wrong? 

They were particularly intrigued by the results of our Peace Intention Experiment, not only the fact that we seemed to have an effect on restoring peace, but also that sending intentions for peace appears to increase peace and tolerance in the sender.

They were gorgeous group – warm and funny and big-hearted - showering me with presents and food. I chatted with the men in the breaks, and ate and went out with the women. I drank in the exotic tradition of Arabia and the more modern turns it had taken.

I moved my own goalposts a bit toward then and by the end of the two days they’d move theirs a little closer to mine.

What my audience wanted from me and other Westerners, most of all, was simple acceptance - for their ways, their commonalities and their exotic differences, to be appreciated and understood. 

God and The Field

Recently, I taped a show with Oprah Winfrey on her Soul Series (to be aired in April – I’ll alert you).  At one point, she asked me pointedly, is the Field God? Many others ask me if believing in the Field isn’t in conflict with traditional religion.

I’ve always maintained that the information I research is more of a proving of religion – scientific evidence of the divine in all of us.

Virtually all major traditions in the world prior to Isaac Newton — pre-literate cultures such as the Aborigines; the ancient Greeks and the Egyptians; the adherents of Eastern religions such as Buddhism, Zen and Taoism; and even modern indigenous cultures  — conceived of the universe as inseparable, connected by some universal energy ‘life force’. The beliefs of virtually all tribal societies about this central energy force have many similarities, suggesting that an intuitive understanding of the interconnectedness of all things is fundamental to human experience.

What I took away from this experience was simple. Far from destroying God, science for the first time is proving His existence – by demonstrating that a higher, collective consciousness is out there.  There need no longer be two truths – the truth of science and the truth for religion.  They can be one unified vision of the world – from wherever on the globe you happen to be.

May the truth of The Field help, as it did on this one occasion, to unite us all.

Intention of the week

Haley Deberardis

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February 22, 2009
5 pm GMT

Help to heal her neurological injuries

 

Haley Deberardis, currently 21, of Smithfield, Rhode Island, was tragic victim of a car accident, in a car driven by her best friend.

Here is the story, as relayed to me by the driver’s mother, Linda Kelleher.

 “ On October 8, 2005 are lives and hearts were changed forever.My daughter and one of her best friends Haley Deberardis, both 18 years of age at the time, were returning from a celebration when they were struck  headon by a truck at very high speed.

“While both were injured, Haley was in critical condition, unable to breathe on her own, requiring sixweeks on the ICU with numerous surgeries.  Total length of agonizing stay in the hospital stay was three months, which resulted in eventual permanent diagnosis of diffuse axonal head injury, leaving her unable to communicate or move  her extremities. Her initial bout in neurological rehab appeared hopeful, she seemed to know we were all there and could follow simple commands, such as as ‘wiggle your toe if you can hear me’.

“Subsequently she could not progress to any meaningful recovery and was discharged home to 24-hour care, fed by gastric tube and lifted from bed to a supportive wheelchair daily, and experiencing numerous hospitalizations for infection.

“Understandably, the family has struggled with her loss, and their pain and anger has impaired our relationship ,leaving my daughter with depression, anxiety and self blame (wishing she could have gotten out of the way of the truck) and wishing it was her instead of Haley that sustained injury.

Therefore, I ask the universe from the bottom of my heart to return Haley's cognitive function, so we can enjoy her laugh and spirit again as well as emotional healing for the lives this has affected.”

My intention is that Haley Deberardis’s cognitive function be completely restored and for her to be healthy and well in every way.’

And I’ll add one more intention for us:  “My intention is for Linda Kelleher’s daughter to forgive herself and to be healed in every way.”.

Healing words

I’m writing a new book this year and curtailing my usual full speaking schedule. One of my only appearances in London this year will be at The Living Matrix: The Science of Healing Conference at Kings College, London (March 13-16, 2009).  It includes the premier of The Living Matrix film, which I appear in, and at the conference  I’ll be sharing my thoughts and research on how thoughts can influence the world around us, especially with healing. Following the conference, I’ll be leading a workshop entitled Living the Field.

 

A number of other leading international complementary health researchers, authors and practitioners, including my friends James Oschman (who has done so much research in energy medicine), Rollin McCraty of Heartmath research fame, and the irrepressible healer Eric Pearl, will also be speaking at the conference and running workshops.

 

If you’d like more information, or to book your place at my workshop please click here. For more information on the conference itself, click here. (If you book before 1st March you receive a 5 per cent discount by quoting promotional code LMC310.)

 

Have a wonderful week.

 

Warm wishes,

 

Lynne McTaggart

 

 

All tangled up

The hardest thing to get your mind around with quantum physics is that the smallest units of the universe like electrons or photons aren’t a solid and stable thing, but a potential of any one of its future selves – or what is known by physicists as a ‘superposition’, or sum, of all probabilities. It’s all its possible selves – all at the same time.

At its most elemental, physical matter isn’t solid and stable – indeed, isn’t an anything yet.

Tangled by entanglement
Another strange feature of quantum physics is a feature called ‘non-locality’, also poetically referred to as ‘quantum entanglement’. The Danish physicist Niels Bohr discovered that once subatomic particles such as electrons or photons are in contact, they remain aware of and influenced by each other instantaneously over any distance forever, despite the absence of the usual things that physicists understand are responsible for influence, such as an exchange of force or energy.

When entangled, the actions – for instance, the magnetic orientation – of one will always influence the other in the same or the opposite direction, no matter how far they are separated.

Modern physicists have demonstrated decisively that once two subatomic particles have connected, the measurement of one photon instantaneously affected the position of the second photon. The two photons continued to talk to each other and whatever happened to one was identical to, or very opposite of, what happened to the other. Today, even the most conservative physicists accept non-locality as a strange feature of subatomic reality.

Although modern physicists now accept these effects as a given feature of the quantum world, they console themselves by maintaining that this strange, counter-intuitive property of the subatomic universe does not apply to anything bigger than a photon or an electron or to anything alive. The prevailing view is that quantum effects are only seen in laboratories with non-living systems at temperatures close to absolute zero. 
Once things gets to the level of atoms and molecules, to the hot and wet world of the living organism — which in the world of physics is termed ‘macroscopic’ — the universe starts behaving itself again, according to predictable, measurable, Newtonian laws.

At the heart of biology
However, the latest evidence demonstrates that quantum effects like entanglement could be at the very  heart of biological processes. A multi-center study carried out by the University of California at Berkeley. Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri and the Institute of Physics of Charles University in the Czech Republic, discovered that quantum processes inside of green sulfur bacteria drives the essential process of converting solar energy into oxygen and food.

The researchers tracked the workings of the protein network connecting the external solar collectors, or chlorosomes, to energy centers inside each cell by hitting these proteins with ultrafast laser pulses and following the trail of the light through the cell structure and into its reaction centers, where the conversion of light into oxygen and carbohydrates takes place. 

To the amazement of the researchers, the light traveled in several directions at once – much as an electron does when travelling undetected in its superposition state. The researchers believe that this energy in a sense ‘tries out’ various pathways before finally choosing the most efficient. 

This stunning finding suggests that the most basic and fundamental of all biological processes, responsible for most of life on earth in the form of oxygen supply and food source, is driven by a quantum process.

Quantum green tea
Another study by a group from the Autonomous University of Barcelona discovered that the antioxidant effects of green tea, which counteract the effects of free radicals, have to do with an effect in which, electrons in a molecule somehow are able to jump over and adhere to a second molecule, even though the laws of classical physics says that electrons are bound together too tightly ever to do such a thing. 

This phenomenon of jumping ship from one molecule to the next is known as ‘quantum tunneling’. The Spanish researchers have discovered that electrons from the antioxidants, called catechins, in the tea engage in a mopping up exercise of free radicals, which produce an extra electron.  The catechin electrons are able to tunnel to a free radical electron, binding it up and preventing it from damaging cells in the body. 

In fact, entanglement is now easy to achieve in large ‘macroscopic’ systems in the lab. Physicist Vlatko Vedral of the University of Leeds, working with a team from Portugal and Austria, was able to show that photons from a laser can be entangled with the crystal lattice of a mirror and that this relationship would persist at high temperatures.

Tied up in the Canaries
In several flamboyant gestures, the famous Austrian quantum physicist Anton Zeilinger and his team have most recently entangled a pair of photons between two islands in the Canaries separated by 144 km metres of sea. Zeilinger and his co-workers  have also transferred money securely between an Austrian Bank and Vienna City Hall using pairs of entangled photons produced by a laser and distributed via optical fibers.   They even showed that non-local links could be established in space by bouncing laser pulses off a satellite to a receiving station on Earth. 

The implications of these discoveries are staggering.  They suggest that scientists must drastically modify their understanding of reality, particularly biological reality.

By accepting these quantum effects as a natural facet of nature we are acknowledging that two of the bedrocks on which our world view rests are wrong: that influence only occurs over time and distance, and that particles, and indeed the things that are made up of particles, only exist independently of each other. 

They suggest that we have to ask ourselves a very fundamental question, perhaps the most fundamental of all:  does anything exist before we perform a measurement on it?  Or to put that another way, if quantum entities, which are so impossible to define before measurements are taken, drive all our basic life processes, does anything exist as an actual something independently of us? 
Suddenly the idea that thoughts can affect the physical world doesn’t seem so strange.

 

Was Einstein wrong?

This week I had a long chat with physicist Hal Puthoff, the hero of my book The Field, and main proponent of the idea that the Zero Point Field provides the essential underpinning of the entire universe. 

 

I always enjoy conversations with Hal because they always take an amazingly arcane turn.

 

Puthoff is one of those incredible frontier scientists – on the ‘frontier of the frontier’ he says, whose life is entirely shaped by the phrase ‘what if’.

 

Puthoff’s latest question is, essentially, nothing less than:  ‘What if Einstein’s general relativity theory is not the entire story? What if, in fact, gravity is not as we think we know it to be?’

 

A 96 per cent mystery

This question comes from genuine dissatisfaction by Puthoff and other scientists, that science cannot explain 96 per cent of the universe.  At the moment, believe it or not, all scientific equations deal with only 4 per cent of the universe.  Cosmologists lump at least three-quarters of the universe as consisting of ‘dark energy’.  Twenty percent more is considered so-called ‘dark matter’.

However, to a number of renegade scientists, the thought occurs that dark matter was only invented to explain the unknowable – say, why galaxies don’t spiral out into space.  If they cannot explain this type of gravitational attraction, why not just invent some unknown alternative? 

 

But to someone like Puthoff, the alternative is to question these unproven assumptions. Consequently, for two and a half years he and his team have been working on an experiment to see whether gravitation force is different from what conventional scientists say it is.  They are working on an experiment that amounts to a sophisticated version of a dumbbell on a string, measuring, via special high-tech microscopes and lasers, every hair’s breath of the device’s movement - down to the level of billionths of a meter. 

 

At the moment, the signal-to-noise problem is a nightmare.  With this kind of delicate operation, even the movement of a car on a highway miles away can disturb and invalidate the experiment. 

 

However, if Puthoff and his team can show a difference in our usual understanding of gravity and that it operates according to different laws, he may well do no less that dispel the idea that so-called ‘dark matter’ exists and demonstrate that gravity is associated with vacuum fluctuations – that is, with the Zero Point Field.

 

Was Einstein wrong?

In other words, he will demonstrate that our concept of gravity is wrong and that the equations for general relativity with their ideas of space-time curvature may not be the whole story.

 

There could be even a field underlying The Field. 

 

The point is that we often revere an expert – whether Einstein or Darwin, as we are especially doing this week – as having the final word.

 

Although we perceive of certain of these discoveries as ultimate truth, science is finally just a story, told in installments. We learn about our world in piecemeal fashion, a process of constant correction and revision.  New chapters refine — and often supplant — the chapters that have come before.

 

If Puthoff is right – and there is no such thing as dark matter, but only a different nature to gravity - clearly the story we’ve been told is about to be replaced by a drastically revised version.

 

The whole truth?

And so we must also consider the work of Charles Darwin in the same vein.  Darwin’s discovery of natural selection was no doubt brilliant.  However, as a student of population overrun, he was convinced that there were already too many people on the planet and that change occurred through a struggle to survive. 

 

It is likely that his theories only represent an approximation of the truth, and that his theory of evolution, with its suggestion that survival is available only to the ruggedly genetic individual, is superceded by increasing evidence that cooperation is the key to survival. 

 

Upcoming Intention Experiments

 

News on our Intention Experiments.  I am in the midst of discussions with materials scientists Rustum Roy about attempting to do another water experiment, this time with polluted water.  There is a great deal of evidence that intention can help to mutate bacteria.

Carroll Nash, the director of the parapsychology department at St Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, ran an experiment on Escherichia coli, showing that both positive and negative intention could be used to mutate the bacteria.  In our experiment, we want to see if we can mutate ‘bad’ bacteria into ‘good’ bacteria and so clean up polluted water.  It’s a big challenge – but one with big implications.  We’re looking at some time in April.  In the meantime, I will be announcing another experiment shortly.  Stay tuned.

 

 

High crimes and prayers

This week the medical profession hit a new low when a UK National Health Service nurse was suspended for offering to prayer for an elderly female patient at a nursing home in mid-December.

 

Although the 79-year-old woman was not offended by the prospect, she was a little taken aback and happened to mention it to another nurse.  Eventually that casual comment made its way to the North Somerset Primary Care Trust, which suspended the nurse in question, a Mrs. Caroline Petrie, 45, indefinitely without pay.

 

Today the Daily Telegraph noted that thousands of other NHS staff could be at risk of being similarly reprimanded, for praying for or even offering to pray for their patients.

 

As Dr. Trevor Stammers, chairman of the Christian Medical Fellowship noted, nurses who make home visits often build up relationships with patients and religion often enters the conversation.

 

Mrs Petrie, a Baptist, who is being represented by a religious rights lawyer, vehemently denied that she was forcing her faith on anyone  - only offering her usual mode of care. “Prayer is a valuable part of the care I give.” 

 

And as Stammers says, Petrie was hardly ramming her beliefs down the patient’s throat. “There is a difference,” he said, “between making an inquiry about prayer and suggesting someone does it.”

 

Prayer ‘not related to health’

A spokesman for the NHS Trust defended its actions by quoting the Nursing and Midwifery Council Code of conduct, which “makes it clear that nurses ‘must not use [their] professional status to promote causes that are not related to health’.”

 

I’m not going to get into the debate over religious freedom, because that, to my mind, isn’t the point.  The point is actually whether prayer is an effective healing tool. 

 

I beg to differ that prayer does not affect health.  For one thing, copious evidence shows that prayer is a potent form of intention that has shown a hugely beneficial effect on outcome when studied in a variety of contexts. 

 

As I recount at length in The Intention Experiment, prayer – on animals, plants and human beings – has been shown in scientific studies to work. Although the big prayer studies at Harvard and Duke University showed no effect of mass prayer on cardiac patients, both had major basic flaws in study design.

 

According to the Bob Barth of the Office of Prayer Research, these studies only represent a small proportion of prayer research. Of the more than 227 studies investigated by his office, 75 per cent have shown a positive impact.

 

So, according to the research, there was a good likelihood that Petrie’s positive intention would have had a beneficial effect.

 

Power of the placebo

Even if there is no actual healing effect of prayer on the receiver. prayer can exert a powerful placebo effect. Medical science admits that the placebo works between 60 to 70 per cent of the time.

 

A recent analysis of 46,000 heart patients, half of whom were taking a placebo, made the astonishing discovery that patients taking a placebo fared as well as those on the heart drug.

 

The only factor determining survival seemed to be belief that the therapy will work and a willingness to follow it religiously. Those who stuck to doctor’s orders to take their drug three times a day fared equally well whether they were taking a drug or just a sugar pill. Patients who tended not to survive were those who had been lax with their regimen, regardless of whether they had been given a placebo or an actual drug.

 

So if the patient thought prayer would help her, it probably would.

 

Then there is the beneficial effect of prayer on the body. A study at the University of Pavia in Italy and the John Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford showed that saying the rosary had the same effect on the body as reciting a mantra. Both were able to create a ‘striking, powerful, and synchronous increase’ in cardiovascular rhythms when recited six times a minute. 

 

Compared to the proven deleterious effect of most nursing home treatments (for instance, the evidence that most psychotropic drugs given nursing home patients just hasten their decline and death), I’d say that prayer was just about the best medicine Caroline Petrie could offer.

 

 

Reminded by dolphins

Recently, I read about a Newcastle University study showing that cows given names produce far more milk than unnamed animals.  The researchers, who studied 516 cows, found that those cows given personal identities – a name like Daisy, say – produced up to 454 more pints of milk a year than cows that remained anonymous. 

 

This especially interested me, mostly because it seemed to be a revelation to the researchers that cows would be happier and more relaxed when given a little bit more one-to-one attention.  It was almost shocking to them that cows would have an interior life.

 

I’ve been watching a series on TV called the Secret Life of Elephants. The show follows groups of elephant families in Northern Kenya at Samburu National Reserve and covers the work of the world-renowned elephant expert Iain Douglas Hamilton and his Save the Elephants team.  Most notably, the show allows us to be witness to the emotional and social complexities of an elephant’s world – the breadth of their emotional landscape, the intricacies of family life.  

 

The show’s remarkable camera work reveals evidence of the complicated grieving mechanism elephants undergo when a member of the family dies, or the rest of the family’s jubilation when their matriarch mates with the toughest elephant on the reserve.  Primarily, it bears witness to the love and closeness of an animal family.

 

The surprising part of the film and indeed the Newcastle study isn’t that cows respond to being fussed over, or that elephants display an array of emotions, but that human beings find this in any way unusual.

 

Copious research shows not only that animals far more sensitive than humans in almost every way, but also that animals appear to have a profound effect on human beings – in improving their health.

 

I’ve just got back from a Transformational Leadership Council meeting in Hawaii and perhaps the most remarkable part of our trip was our 12-year-old daughter’s session swimming with dolphins.  Her elation afterward may have been emotional – she’s a great animal lover and this has been a dream of hers for many years – but I believe it also was physiological.

 

In studies of human and dolphin interactions, it’s been found that dolphins have profound effects on human beings.  For instance, dolphins produce brainwave changes in humans in their company.  David Cole, computer scientists at Fort Myers, Florida, fascinated by the possibility that dolphins might have a profound physiological effect on humans, developed a neuromapping electroencephalography (EEG) instrument to study the neurological effects on the human brain of close contact with dolphins. 

 

In his research Cole found that after swimming, touching, playing or diving with dolphins, a participant’s dominant brainwave frequency slows significantly from a beta frequency (the state of ordinary consciousness) to something resembling an alpha state, the brainwave frequency of light meditation or dreaming.  He also found that the brain hemispheres synchronize, so that the brainwaves emitted from both the left and right hemispheres are in phase (peaking and troughing at the same time) and of similar frequency (speed).

 

This is precisely the type of left-right brain synchronization that occurs in like monks and other experienced meditators after a long session of meditation.

 

Other evidence shows that the production and uptake of the brain’s neurotransmitters are strengthened by dolphin contact. 

 

Although some scientists believe the positive effects have to do with chemical changes in cells caused by the sound waves emitted by dolphins, this may not be the whole story.  Many behavioral and electrophysiological changes have been observed in people exposed to dolphins at much further distances. 

 

Another possibility suggested by dolphin researchers is a process called ‘resonant entrainment’, a situation analogous to when one tuning fork hits a pitch, causing nearby tuning forks to vibrate at the same frequency.  And we know that bottlenose dolphins produce low-frequency electromagnetic and scalar (or standing) waves.

 

In the Hello Dolphin Project in Florida, researchers used special sensor and recording equipment to record all signals emanating from dolphins.  They then also recorded the brainwave frequencies of the children participating in the study. 

 

When the dolphins were present, the scientists recorded an electrical, magnetic and acoustical extremely-low frequency signal of about 16 Hz in nearly three-quarters of all the trials. 

 

Here’s the amazing part of the story. After the children interacted with the dolphins, their brainwaves had made profound shifts to a predominant frequency near 16 Hz – exactly the frequency of the dolphin signal.

 

The researchers concluded that dolphins simultaneously emit acoustical, electrical and magnetic fields, and that after first sensing electrical fields from humans, the dolphins then attempt to communicate using the same frequencies (in the human brainwave band of 6-30 Hz). In other words, they both communicate with us and then ‘correct’ us.

 

We feel better around dolphins because they ‘remind’ our bodies of our ideal frequencies. 

 

It is we who should feel better if cows deem us worthy of a name.

 

Body heat

This month for the our upcoming February issue of our newsletter What Doctors Don’t Tell You, my husband Bryan Hubbard produced some extraordinary research about the nature of cancer.

 

While flipping through some medical literature, he discovered the astonishing statistic that 22 per cent of all breast cancer just goes away by itself.  Intrigued, he then looked for more evidence of cancer burning itself out, and discovered that, contrary to received wisdom - that cancer is a virtual death sentence when left to its own devices - most of the big cancers that claim hundreds of lives every year just go away a fair percentage of the time.

 

Although deep psychological changes within the patient often account for some of the cases, the common denominator for most such cases was high fever.  At some point in the course of their illness, the patients suffered a serious infection, which caused a prolonged raised body temperature.  After the illness had run its course, and their body temperature returned to normal, the cancer had literally been burned away. 

 

That information no only interests me for its implications in cancer treatment, but also for what it suggests about our own body heat and  internal thermal effects as a potent healing modality. 

 

Heat was the solution

When my children were small, I used to marvel at the ability of their young and perfect bodies to purge themselves of illnesses through a rapid rise in temperature – as though they’d been set alight.  It afforded me a rare glimpse of an uncompromised body in the throes of self-repair.

 

Even in those early days, I understood that the heat wasn’t the problem – the heat was the solution.  The worst thing I could do was to put out the fire with antibiotic or anti-inflammatories. I would look to our homeopaths to make them comfortable and to get them through the fever safely, while I sat back and observed what appeared to be a miracle.

 

Although fever in a young child is rarely left to its own devices, it is instructive to watch it run its course. After a night of such heat and copious sweat, the child often awakes as though the entire episode has been imagined.  She sits up smiling, and there often is not only no evidence of fever but no evidence of the original infection.

 

In the past, doctors attempting to use the power of body heat would infect their patients with dangerous bacteria.  These days, we have more sophisticated means of raising body temperature.  In the Far East, Japanese and Chinese scientists have been experimenting with infrared energy –the second lowest energy band on the electromagnetic spectrum.  This band of EM waves, which is just below visible red light (hence the name ‘infra red’) is also subdivided into three wavelengths – near, middle and far infrared (FIR), the longest waves of the three.

 

Although FIR wavelengths are too long for us to see, we experience this naturally occurring energy from the sun (and even a hot light bulb) as a gentle form of radiant heat, warming us directly by direct light conversion without raising the temperature of the surrounding air. This eventually induces an increase in body temperature, by moving body fluids around more quickly, causing profuse sweating, but at a much lower temperature than with ordinary thermal heat, as, say, produced by a Finnish-style sauna.

 

Japanese scientists have discovered that far infrared saunas appear to offer the same extraordinary benefits as high fever.  Congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, overweight, pain - even modern day pollution overload like chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia respond to these particular frequencies of electromagnetic waves.

 

Infrared waves from the hands

I am particularly fascinated by this particular use of heat for self-repair because distant healing may generate far infrared waves. In 1991, a group of biochemists at the National Yang-Ming Medical College in Taipei, Taiwan, using electronic equipment to examine the electromagnetic spectra of waves generated by a Qigong master when sending healing Qi, detected large amounts of infrared waves in the vicinity of the master’s palms.

 

 The study also found that the Qi not only stimulated cell growth, DNA synthesis and protein synthesis in cells, but also had a positive effect on fibroblasts, which build cellular tissue (Am J Chin Med 1991; 19: 285-92).

 

A similar study of human energy (called Kikoh in Japan) also recorded infrared waves and found that they potentiated human leukocyte functions in white blood cells (Int J Biometeorol. 1993; 37: 133-8)

 

But what seems to be most important of all is the raised temperature. One study of far-infrared use found it had no effect in inhibiting tumors when used at ambient temperatures, but it markedly inhibited cancer growth when combined with whole-body hyperthermia.

 

All this evidence suggests to me that the German physicist Fritz Albert Popp indeed was right in his theory that illness, in a sense, is scrambled frequency.  In his work, he is discovering certain bands of electromagnetic frequencies that have healing properties.  The work on heat and far infrared suggests that we may well possess those frequencies ourselves to repair our own light, when it goes awry.

 

 

The results of the Peace Intention Experiment:

A pivotal week

 Recently I received the preliminary report from Jessica Utts, professor of statistics at University of California at Irvine.  She has spent some weeks examining and analyzing the deaths and violent attacks in the Sri Lankan civil war for 26 months – two years before and two months after our Peace Intention Experiment. 

 

The results she has reported thus far are extraordinary – suggesting that our Peace Intention Experiment may have been pivotal in helping to hasten the end of the war, which now appears imminent.

 

In order to show whether an effect is higher or lower than predicted, statisticians often use a trend-analysis plot.

 

Dr. Utts created just such a chart for all of the 26 months.  The chart revealed that the violence vastly increased to levels far higher than predicted during the week of our experiment and for a few weeks afterward, and then plummeted to below what was expected. 

 

In fact, the violence was the highest it had ever been over the entire two-year period during the very week of our experiment. 

 

In this graph, you’ll see the analysis.  The red line represents the average of predicted levels.

 

The fifth point from the end  - the every high one - is the week of our experiment, and the four points afterward are the after effects.  As you can see, the violence levels are far than predicted, sharply drop after the high week of the experiment and then fall below what is expected.  

From the perspective of these two-plus years, our week of intention may have proved pivotal. During that week, the Sri Lankan army won a number of strategically important battles, which enabled them to turn around the war.   

 

One week ago, on January 2, 2009, the army finally expelled the separatist guerrillas from their capital of Kilinochchi.   Today, they recaptured the strategic Elephant pass, opening up the entire northern Jaffna Peninsula – where mainland Sri Lanka connects with the northern peninsula  - for the first time in nine years, liberating the entire Wanni district – the very target of our intention.

 

This is the first time in 23 years that the government has taken full control of the strategic 142-km long A-9 road, which was the supply route of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) rebel forces.

 

Those of the LTTE terrorists that remain – and analysts believe the numbers of trained fighters have shrunk to 2000 – have been wedged into a tiny corner of northeastern Sri Lanka of about 330 square km.  The military believes that they will move operations to the eastern port of Mullaittivu for their final stand.

So was this down to us and our intention? Certainly, in September, the rebels had a tight grip on the north.  Although the army had made some inroads in August, even as recently as May commentators believed that peace talks were out of the question.

Now, after all the decisive wins in September and January, many political analysts have laid down predictions that the 25-year-civil war will end in 2009.

This could have been entirely coincidental – or it could be the result of intention.  Only more Peace Intention Experiments will give us the answer.

But why did the violence initially increase before drastically falling?  We don’t know the answer to that, either?  It could be

 1) coincidence

2) our intention to lower violence had the effect of accelerating the army’s victories over the rebels so that further violence would end

3) our intention made things worse before they got better

Until we run another Peace Intention Experiment, we won’t know the answer.  But as Jessica succinctly put it, when noting that the highest weekly total for violence in the entire 26-month period was our very week: “Weird, huh?”

In defense of God

It is particularly fashionable today, as it has been at certain times throughout history, to repudiate belief in God.

 

 “It’s so refreshing, after being told all your life that it is virtuous to be full of faith, spirit and superstition, to read such a resounding trumpet blast for truth instead,” wrote Matt Ridley about the release of Richard Dawkins’ The God Delusion.

 

As someone who rejected the Catholic faith of my youth, I can certainly agree with atheists who put forward the argument that most organized, fundamentalist religion is to blame for most of the conflict and divisiveness on earth.  

 

Nevertheless, more than an argument against fundamentalism, books such as God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything by Christopher Hitchens are believed to represent a kind of modern-day metaphysical machismo.  Hitchens, Dawkins and other members of the atheist and rationalist movement are seen as the ultimate hard-man realists, the Clint Eastwoods of the spirit, and theirs the braver position than that of the quiche-eaters among us, who pull our punches in the belief that a more complex paradigm, even if we don’t yet fully understand it, may offer a better approach to the defining our universe and ourselves. 

 

The rationalist’s utter reliance on science to define us seems to me a throwback to the time immediately after the Second World War, when, flushed with our success with the atomic bomb, we still believed that modern technology was capable of supplying us with a solution to all of life’s problems. DuPont’s advertising slogan, Better Living through Chemistry, stood as the mantra of the age.

 

Modern day voodoo

All these years later, I have a problem with science and secularism as God.  First of all, from where I sit, current science – particularly scientific medicine -  is anything but rational. After 20 years of studying the medical literature I have concluded that modern medicine is not a science.

 

For all the science-speak in medicine about painstakingly controlled study and meticulous peer review -  for all the attempt to cloak medicine in the weighty mantle of science - a good deal of what we regard as standard medical practice today amounts to little more than 21st century voo-doo.

 

Medicine’s current understanding of the body, which is essentially as a broken piece of machinery to be repaired, never takes into account the body’s extraordinary potential to operate beyond the empirical. 

 

What are we to make of the 8 per cent of breast cancer that just disappears by spontaneous remission?  What are we to make of the fact that the placebo effect works more than two-thirds of the time? How does all of this fit into a rational universe?

 

The problem of the supernatural

In order to determine whether atheists have a point here, I need a better description of what it is we’re arguing over. Richard Dawkins’s picks his basic quarrel with God as a supernatural being. 

 

I have a problem with this word  ‘supernatural’. I am immersed in science of one sort or another every day of my life, and I am a daily witness to the miraculous, more that can only be described as supernatural to our present understanding. 

 

I see good scientific evidence that engaging in strange rituals like tapping parts of the body or staring at a moving target while mouthing affirmations can cure physical and psychological illness. I see large numbers of validated case studies of people are completely aware of their surroundings  - and from the vantage point of the ceiling – when they are either comatose or clinically dead. 

I see evidence of the holy, the miraculous in the fact that an electron can be both a particle or a wave at the same moment and change depending upon who is looking at it.

 

The death of the spiritual

As novelist Jeanette Winterson wrote last week in her Saturday London Times column, the problem with the polarization today, between the rational and the fundamentalist, is the death of mysticism, of genuine spiritual content in our lives.

 

‘. . . the kingdom of this world, as the Bible puts it so beautifully, can be balanced only by the kingdom of God,’ she wrote. ‘This is not literal; it is symbolic.  It is how the inner life checks the outward show.  It is how conscience bridles impulse, it means recognising that there is much more to human life than the worship beneath the twin towers of money and power.

 

‘The job of religion is to keep this in our sights.  I don’t care if it’s all a construct.  I don’t need to believe in a sky-god or any god at all in the described sense.  The world “mystery” is at the heart of all religions because we cannot be literal-minded about belief.’

 

What she is saying is that our beliefs – and from their our morality – come from the embrace of the mystery of existence.

 

Many readers write in to ask if I think that God is The Field. The answer is I do – in the sense that The Field represents the essential unity of all things  - the essential nature of which we can only partially grasp. 

 

The problem in not believing in anything beyond the empirical is ourselves.  As human beings we will always only have a crude approximation of the mystery of our existence.

 

All we have, in the end, is our belief, our sense of the divinity of life, while we continue taking baby steps toward an understanding of the miracle we see before us. 

 

There is only one thing for it, no matter who or what your God. As Annie Dillard once wrote, “Pray without ceasing.”

 

May you have a miraculous holiday and 2009.

 

Warm wishes,

 

Lynne McTaggart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have Yourself a Rational Little Christmas

Have Yourself a Rational Little Christmas

 

Dear Friends,

 

 

Have you heard about the new Christmas card making the rounds?  On the cover it reads:

 

‘On December 25th, a Savior was born. He revealed eternal Truth, bringing Joy to millions. He astonished the world with His command over Nature. He changed history forever.’

 

You open up the card it says: ‘Happy Birthday, Sir Isaac Newton. December 25, 1642 - March 20, 1726.’

 

The cardmaker, John Powers, who describes himself as an  ‘objectivist’, was compelled to produce this card because he was tired of having everyone’s else’s religious statements rammed down his throat, while having to limit his own response, as an atheist, to the bland offering:  ‘Happy Holidays’.

 

‘I decided that if it's okay for (almost) everyone else to stamp, seal, and deliver their philosophy to me every Christmas, I'll do just the same,’ he says.

 

The ‘rational’ movement is now targeting Christmas.  In the UK, a show entitled ‘Nine Lessons And Carols For Godless People:A Rational Celebration of Christmas’ at the Bloomsbury Theatre next week, is sold out.

 

The show, stars alongside comedian Ricky Gervais, such guardians of rational thinking as Richard Dawkins and Ben Goldacre, a Guardian newspaper columnist wedded to trashing anything he considers ‘junk science’.

 

As the Skeptic has written, ‘Rather than talking of Jesus’s birth, acclaimed science author Simon Singh will talk about the birth of the universe. Instead of talking about Gold, Frankincense and Myrrh, Bad Science Columnist Ben Goldacre will talk of alternative medicine and charlatans, while Josie Long [a British comedienne] will talk about the wonder of the stars.’

 

The purpose of the evening, we’re told, is not to knock Christmas, but to celebrate the wonder of the universe, rather than pandering to the myths of ‘fundamentalists’. 

 

Scientific fundamentalism

I have no quarrel with the idea of celebrating the wonder of life here on earth – at this time of year or any other.  What I do have a problem with is calling the discoveries of Newton and the views of Dawkins or Goldacre any sort of final truth, or indeed considering these opinions any more rational or less fundamentalist than those of religious fanaticism.

 

My own study of science and medicine has convinced me that medicine and science are subject to myths as powerful as the virgin birth. 

 

Religion is finally a story – a story to help us to make sense of the miracle and puzzlement of our life and death - but so is science.

 

The scientific story is told in installments. We learn about our world in piecemeal fashion, a process of constant correction and revision.  New chapters refine — and often supplant — the chapters that have come before.

 

The Rational Christmas evening plans to classic archive footage of the late astronomer Carl Sagan and celebrated physicist Richard Feynman, who once termed Newtonian laws science’s grand ‘rules of the game’. 

 

These rules – now more than 300 years old - described a tidy little universe as a collection of isolated, well-behaved, discrete and self-contained objects operating according to certain fixed laws.

 

New scientific story

The work being carried out in prestigious laboratories all over the world have recently torn up that rulebook and scattered it to the four winds.

 

The latest scientific story suggests that at our essence, we exist not so much as a collection of separate entities, but as a unity, a relationship — utterly interdependent, the parts affecting the whole at every moment.

 

Our understanding of ourselves and our universe is in flux possibly more than ever before. 

 

Nevertheless, most of the pundits of ‘rational science’ hold onto the outmoded Newtonian view of our universe just as rigidly as a Christian or Muslim fundamentalist holds onto a literal interpretation of his or her holy book.

 

At this unique point in history, science and religion are beginning to converge.  Science has begun to prove what peoples of all cultures have instinctively understood for generations.

 

We can only gasp in wonderment as each chapter unfolds and we discover that we are something far more impressive than evolutionary happenstance or genetic survival machine.  Literally any interpretation of what is human and what is divine could hold sway.

 

The most rational point of view these days is an open mind and a healthy respect for what human beings have intuitively grasped and described in mythical – and often symbolic - stories through the ages. The Christmas story, with its central message of rebirth and renewal, is just such a powerful message – with far more meaning to our human experience than F=Ma.

 

I have my own Christmas card I’d like to print.  As William Blake once famously wrote in a letter:

 

 ‘Pray God us keep

 ‘From single vision & Newton’s sleep.’

 

 

Have a non-rational week.

 

Warm wishes,

 

 

 

Lynne McTaggart

 

Start your own circle of protection against a broken heart

Last week, when I wrote about the power of a group of 10 friends, we had a large group of comments from readers – many wanting to know more about the power of 10 and also how to create such a tribe.

 

This week I want to share with you that creating this small tribe can prove more powerful as a preventative than any diet or drug from dying from heart disease – which is almost always, metaphorically speaking, caused by dying from a broken heart.

 

Studies of populations, such as Japanese-Americans, demonstrate that social networks and social support protect them against heart disease — regardless of whether they smoke or suffer from high blood pressure.

 

Even in America, in a study of over 200 elderly, healthy adults, those with good support networks had lower blood cholesterol levels and higher levels of immune function than those without this emotional support.

 

As I mentioned last week, how much you smoked or what you ate didn't seem to have as much bearing on your heart as whether you felt isolated from the world.

 

This situation even exists in animal societies. Researchers conducting heart studies on rabbits were flabbergasted to find that among the animals given high cholesterol-producing diets, those who were played with and petted by researchers developed less cardiovascular disease than those who were in cages out of reach and left alone.

 

Whether in animals or humans, a high-cholesterol diet appears not to have as much to do with heart disease as a lack of connection. Many other studies have shown that strong community involvement is one of the most important indicators of health.

 

The power of a coherent community

As those of you who have read my books know, one of my favorite examples of the power of community is a small town in Pennsylvania called Roseto.  This tiny town was entirely populated with immigrants from the same area of Italy.  Along with the people themselves, their culture had been transplanted in its entirety.  The town shared a very cohesive sense of community; rich lived cheek by jowl with poor, but such was the sense of interrelation that jealousy seemed to be minimized. 

 

Roseto had an amazing health record. Despite the prevalence of a number of high-risk factors in the community – smoking, economic stress, high-fat diets – the people of Roseto had a heart-attack rate less than half that of neighboring towns. 

 

As soon as the cohesiveness of the town broke up a generation later, Roseto began to resemble an ordinary American town – a collection of isolated individuals – and, seemingly in parallel, the heart-attack rate quickly escalated to that of neighboring towns. 

 

Numerous studies show that people who are self-absorbed, cynical and hostile to the world also are more likely to die from a heart attack. One study actually found that the number of times a person used 'I' words like 'I', 'me' and 'mine' in an ordinary conversation multiplied the risk of a person's dying from heart disease.

 

How to set up your group of 10

But for many of us who are busy with work, partners and even children, we lack the time to set up these important social lifelines, and eventually, once we want them, we have forgotten how or don’t have the contacts to find likeminded individuals.

 

So why not create some groups of 10 right here on the website?  Here’s how to do it.  Go to our Intention Experiment Community home page and click on Groups. Then just set up a Power of 10 group.  To help you along, I’ve already set up a few.  And then you can begin writing to each other.  You can also set up some in particular areas – a Power of 10 group for Seattle, or London.  That way, you’ll begin meeting with likeminded souls in cyberspace, and once you feel comfortable, you’ll be able to meet them in person.

 

As for all the rest of you, here are five ways to meet your tribe:

 

·          Blog on this site and ask for people near you

·          Leave a notice at your local health shop or alternative clinic – people interested in consciousness often are often also interested in alternative health

·          Go to a talk or workshop concerning the new science or consciousness being held in your local area and ask the organizers to mention that you’re interested in meeting likeminded souls to discuss this work afterward

·          Join or create a Living the Field group

·          Contact your local IONS group to find people in your area who meet regularly and talk to them about creating a cyber site here on the website (www.ions.com)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Circle of Life

I was struck by a tiny item in the newspaper the other day that seems to speak to these hard economic and political times and also this special Thanksgiving weekend. It concerned Dr. Richard Tunney, a psychologist at the University of Nottingham, in Great Britain, who’d carried out a study for the UK’s National Lottery examining levels of happiness and overall satisfaction with life among those who’d won the lottery, compared with a sampling of non-winners across the nation. 

 

Approximately 1800 people participated in the survey, which examined how satisfied they were with their lives and achievements and also the kinds of relationships they had with friends, including when they met, how often they speak, which activities they participate in together and the number of new friends they made in the last two years. 

 

Tunney discovered that achievements and even money mattered a good deal less than friendship. Those with five friends or fewer had a 60 per cent chance of being unhappy, irrespective of their economic status or of whether they had won the lottery.  Those with five close friends had a 50 per cent chance of being happy, but by far the happiest were those with at least 10 friends, who had about a 55 per cent of being happy and satisfied with their lot in life.

 

Furthermore, those people who counted themselves as ‘extremely satisfied’ with their lives had twice as many friends as those who were ‘extremely dissatisfied’ with their lives.

 

The critical mass of friends required to ensure happiness appeared to be 10; adding on more friends didn’t significantly increase the participants’ levels of happiness. 

 

Furthermore, those who were happiest of all were part of a small close-knit social circle that had existed for a long time.

 

Dying of a broken heart

 Dr Dean Ornish, assistant clinical professor of medicine at the School for Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, has collected copious research on the various causes of heart disease. He has discovered that while smoking, obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and high-fat diet are important risk factors, they only account for half of all heart disease. No one risk factor appears more important than isolation —from other people, from our own feelings and from a higher source.

 

In studies in San Francisco and in Eastern Finland among the nearly 20,000 people observed for up to nine years, those who were lonely and isolated socially were two to three times more likely to die from heart disease and other causes than those who felt connected to others. The results occurred independently of risk factors such as high cholesterol levels or high blood pressure, smoking and family history.

 

Every so-called lifestyle risk factor had less to do with someone having a heart attack than loneliness. How much you smoke or what you eat doesn’t seem to have as much bearing on your health as a lack of connection.

 

Tribe of ten

For a number of years, I have supported the creation of micro communities of eight or more on my Intention Experiment website, who correspond solely through the website but nevertheless develop close and supportive relationships. After regularly communicating and forming strong, cohesive bonds, these small groups have demonstrated effects that are nothing short of miraculous.

 

This bonding can occur in a single weekend. During our Living with Intention weekend workshops, we divide the audience of attendees into small groups of 10 or more teach them techniques of group intention and have them practice healing intention on members of their group with health challenges. On the final day of the workshop, we ask both healers and healees to share any physical or psychological changes, for better or worse, that they’ve experienced over the weekend.

 

We are often witness to stories of seemingly extraordinary healings. To cite one example, Marsha, I’ll call her, had developed an opacity in one cornea, largely blocking the vision of one eye.  The following day, after her group’s healing intention, she claimed that her sight in that eye had been 80 per cent restored.

 

On this Thanksgiving weekend, may I suggest that you gather around and connect with your own tribe of 10 closest and dearest. By doing so, you will remind yourself in these hard times of what you have to be most thankful for.

 

The Intention Experiment: What should we work on next?

While we’re assembling our final figures for the Peace intention Experiment (a task made more difficult because the Sri Lankan government recently banned the media from reporting on casualties – so our latest figures are tougher to come by), we are still getting in fascinating ideas about what to feature in the coming months. 

 

Thirty-five per cent of you who filled out our survey indicated you’d like to carry out large-scale Intentions of the Week, sending intention to people with health challenges.

 

We’ll be starting our new Intentions of the Week on a special web platform next week that will re-create the same type of pages we used for the Peace Intention Experiment.

 

But we need to hear from you about your favorite targets for these informal experiments (that is, ones where I don’t have a scientific team analyzing the results). 

 

So, I need your nominees – worthy people with health challenges or other difficulties who need our group intention.  When you nominate someone, please sent a photo of the person to: cs@livingthefield.com, with the following information:

 

  • full name
  • age
  • location (city/town, country)
  • Full description of illness or other challenge

 

If you’d like to nominate something else besides a person, please send it here or comment on this blog, below. 

 

The vast majority of you filling out our survey wanted to run the formal scientific quarterly experiments on peace and other scientific subjects, and we’ll be investigating running another large-scale experiment in January or February 2008, again with a scientific team analyzing the results. 

 

But a good 60 per cent of you also discussed the ideas of running monthly peace or other more ‘informal’ experiments with a particular target (let’s say, the American economy, for instance). 

 

In this case, we won’t analyze them scientifically; we’ll just send out intentions as a large group, experience our group effect, observe any observable changes in our target and enjoy the effect of group peace in our own lives.

 

One suggested a regular cycle, to refer her Unity church to.  We’ll can this up with our regular Intention of the Week and our informal monthly intentions.

 

If you’d like to participate in our monthly experiments, please nominate a specific target, on this blog, or by sending your choice to cs@livingthefield.com.

 

Remember:  intention works best when it’s highly specific, so please send in very specific targets.

 

A few wrote in to say they’d like intention sent to animals and the plight of other creatures; others, that we should send intention to the Belgian Congo, which is experiencing so much difficulty.   So let us know, by email or blog, below.

 

 

Please tell us your views on our survey

If you participated in the Peace Intention Experiment but haven’t answered the survey yet, please join in with the thousands of others to let us know how it was for you and whether you are still experiencing peace in your life.  Remember: we’ll keep your details confidential and you’ll be contributing to vital scientific research. So, please, just take a moment to fill out the survey by clicking here.

 

More permanent changes

We’re still hearing from people who say their lives changed from the Peace Intention Experiment; one wrote in to say that he began to make a daily peace ‘meditation’ a daily part of his life, which is changing his entire life. 

 

A number of you wondered why we had the experiment carry on for eight days; as you may recall, we were trying to shape the experiment to resemble the kinds of experiments carried out by the Transcendental Meditation organization, which examined the effect of mass meditation on lowering crime and conflict.  Their minimum times were at least a week, so we felt that we should replicate this as closely as possible. They experienced a 10 per cent decrease, which is why we specified 10 per cent ourselves. It may well be that we won’t have to, in future.  Our final data will tell us.

 

As for how we can improve, aside from the technical issues (and I’ve had many computer people volunteer to help out in future), a good number of you asked if we could avoid pictures of violence of death in future.  “A couple of the days, I had to cover the photos of guns and bodies.  I could not stand to see them.”  

 

One mentioned that as his eyes are closed when he gets into this state, it would be helpful to have a bell at the beginning of the Powering up phase, and every time the page changes.

 

Many people asked if they could just send intention whenever they could, rather than at the specified time.  I’m asking you all to participate at the same moment, because we’re measuring the effect of mass intention at the same moment (particularly with the Global Consciousness Project’s REG machines). Furthermore, our participants tell us that they find the experience of joining together in a single place (our website) with thousands of people around the world at the exact same moment palpable and blissful. 

 

Nevertheless, in the future we will look into ways that people can participate who don’t have access to a computer. A few of you discussed the idea of logging into a designated site and downloading the target information beforehand.

 

Others from foreign countries asked for translations (into Dutch, Spanish, Greek and French), which we’ll try to effect next year.

 

The Australians asked for a better time for the experiment (we’ll do it later in the day so it’s a friendlier time for you.) 

 

One person wrote, “I would precede the experiment with a week in which participants practice linking with one another.” That is a great idea – it would also help us to monitor the website before the experiment.

 

Let us know your views of future experiments, below or by writing to cs@livingthefield.com.

 

 

More fascinating information about how you participated

Two-thirds to three-fourths of our respondents participated on all the days of the experiment, although 54 per cent had some trouble accessing the site and have many ideas for next time, which I’ll share with you next week.

 

Some 88 per cent participated on their computer, with 7 per cent, who knew the target was Sri Lanka, but who either couldn’t get on the site or didn’t try to, participating at the right time offline.  Another 2 per cent didn’t know the target was Sri Lanka, but just sent a good intention at the appropriate time.

 

PCs of some variety were the implement of choice, with nearly 89 per cent using some variety of one, and only 12 percent on an iMac.  Nevertheless, 0.8 per cent of our group participated from their iPhone or Danger Hiptop.

 

Although the overwhelming majority were from the US, and Canada, we had a large contingency from every country in Western Europe, with Eastern European represented by Russia, Slovenia and Hungary.

 

Besides many participants from Australia and New Zealand, our more far-flung participants live in Trinidad, Malaysia, Bostwana and Thailand. Peace intentions poured in from Israel but also from the UAE Pakistan, Lebanon and Qatar.

 

One day I’d like to compare outcomes from intention novices, versus those who are experienced to see whether experience (and technique) improve outcome, as it has in our early experiments.

 

 

 

 

Warm wishes,

 

Lynne McTaggart

 

 

 

 

 

How healing healed the healers

Dear Readers,

 

After months of non-stop travel and speaking engagements I’m finally back in the UK and staying put for several months.

 

I have some fascinating preliminary results from our Reader’s Survey. The survey was designed to answer two questions: 

 

  • how easy it was for you to participate (and what can we do to improve things in the future)
  •  whether your participation in a Peace experiment changed your life during or after the experiment -  for better or worse.

 

After participating, an overwhelming majority of our participants not only felt better about themselves and the world; they also tended to get along better with the people with whom they came into contact, most especially perfect strangers.

 

Many made profound changes in their lives and directions, and even sought to radically change direction or careers .

 

Others found it easier to cope with setbacks and downturns in their lives, including their current financial difficulties. Most of all, they found it easier to accept people or ideas that clash with their own.

 

These preliminary results suggests that using this kind of altruistic intention not only may help to grow your own sense of compassion and tolerance, but also may help you to heal your own life. 

 

It accords with much of the research I have studied on intention.  Altruistic intention heals the healer as much as the healee. 

 

Novice intenders

Of the respondents we’ve had thus far (representing some 6 per cent of our total body of participants), the participants were experienced meditators, but relatively inexperienced in intention. Virtually all our participants were meditators, with nearly half regular meditators, and 40 per cent meditating more than 10 years.

 

Nevertheless, a majority (57 per cent) hadn’t practiced Powering Up, the intention program that I developed after interviewing intention masters  -  until the Peace Experiment itself. 

 

So if it is finally shown that we had a profound effect, it will have been achieved by intention novices.

 

 

Compassionate love and peace

During the experiment, most people experienced a profound state of peace and love.  The majority (57 per cent) said they mostly felt peaceful, with 56 per cent feeling a surge of compassionate love, and 42 per cent an overwhelming sense of unity.  One-tenth experienced a sense of being outside of their bodies. 

 

Participating in the experiment also made people feel better about themselves and their world. Immediately afterward, half our participants felts more optimistic that world peace was achievable.  Some 45 per cent felt more peaceful than usual, more than a third more compassionate than usual or more connected with others in their lives, and 18 per cent felt happier than usual.

 

Long-term increase in compassion

Most interesting of all was the long-term effect of the experiments on our participants.  Some 44 per cent of our participants noticed changes in their relationships with others during the experiment, notably between parents and children, in-laws of every variety or siblings.  Intention apparently helped them to feel more love in general, whether they knew the recipient or not.  

 

·   ‘I . . . have improved a conflicted relationship with my Mom’ – coincidentally this occurred after the experiment.’

 

·   ‘Family relationships have eased.’

 

·    “I left the experiment to live with a son and daughter-in-law for five weeks.  My daughter-in-law and I now have an improved relationship.’

·    

·    ‘I am peaceful and not reactive when my husband rages at me – I am more able to hear his pain.’

 

·    ‘The changes that happened to my family during the P. I. E. affected them greatly in a positive way.’

 

·    ‘Relationships with whiny people seem to be improving.’

 

·    ‘Other people’s children.’

 

·    ‘My sister’.

 

Although more than a quarter either felt more love for their loved ones or for people they normally dislike or argue with, 41 per cent felt more love for anyone with whom they came into contact, and 19 per cent found they were getting along better with perfect strangers.

 

·    ‘The experiment showed me that we all strangers can do great things together and I look at strangers with that in mind.’

 

·   ‘ I feel safer or more courageous in talking with others – friends or strangers.’

 

·   ‘ I try to allow room for disagreement as an option. I am more aware of discord and negativity around me being very tiring and quite often unnecessary.”

 

·    ‘I become conscious of unnecessary conflict much more quickly and give up struggling with others.  I honor them instead.  I listen more.’

 

·   ‘ More straightforwardness and honesty.’

 

·    ‘More grounded and even tempered lately.  More productive and self-determining.’

 

·   ‘At work I answer phones.  Recently, I began saying a quick prayer (to myself) for every person I talk to. I pray “God bless you, bless you, and give you a long, healthy and happy life.’  I have experienced an increase of peace and love with each person I talk to.  I realize, only now, that this practice started after the Intention Experiment.’

 

In fact, when I asked with whom have your relationships most improved, although nearly one third said partners or spouses, slightly more than a third their friends, and one-quarter their children, the largest group  - 38 per cent – said they noticed the biggest change in how they got along with strangers.  The experience of working together with thousands of strangers gave many people the ability to bond with or be more accepting of other people they don’t know personally.  

 

For some, relations actually worsened with friends or relations -  from daughters-in law to landlords -  often because our respondents have become more conscious of behavior – theirs and other people’s – and are now less willing to hide their own feelings:

 

·   ‘ I have mended fences and been more bluntly honest about my own fears and defensive behaviors.’

 

·    ‘My relationship with my spouse temporarily worsened as I became more critical.’

 

·   ‘My husband has always kept a certain emotional distance, and I seem to be tolerating that less.  The relationship has not worsened, I am just speaking up more.’

 

·   ‘People who annoyed me before the experiment have become even more annoying, but seem to be appearing less often in my life.’

 

More than half (53 per cent) felt more loving toward the world in general, and nearly a third more loving toward themselves, and more forgiving and tolerant toward groups they often abhorred in the past:

 

·   ‘I am taking the passage of California’s Proposition 8 [which bans gay marriage] easier than I would expect.’

 

·   ‘The Republican party in the USA bothers me no longer!’

 

·   ‘All this prompted me – now I am more tuned into why – to spend the Election Day in the US in prayer because as a nation we are so polarized.  Don’t feed the hatred of Bush.’

 

Many simply said they ‘woke up’ to suffering in the world or wished to turn their attention to others:

 

·   ‘I am more aware of violence in other places in the world.’

 

·   ‘I feel very good about doing something that gives to others.  I will continue this.’

 

Others that they felt more positive about the future:

 

·   ‘I feel more positive about the changes taking place in the world and the direction that we are moving towards is one of unity.’

 

·    ‘Hopeful for the world, for our country.’

 

·   ‘I am more “at peace” even though my external realities, especially financial, are the lowest they have been in a long while.’

 

·   ‘I have noticed that I gained a bit more objectivity about a couple of situations in my life.’

 

·    ‘Temporarily high energy levels.’

 

·    ‘I feel encouraged about the future – that this type of activity can create a powerful change for the better.’

 

·    ‘More empowered and connected with circumstances in general.’

 

·   “Much safer about trusting my inherent skills of intuition how to communicate with others under different circumstances.’

 

·   ‘More curious and empowered to participate in group constellations.’ I have mostly been a one-woman kind of woman – stronger on my own.  I feel differently towards the power of the group.’

 

·   ‘Inner confidence on a certain level that I am a being who is separate from any circumstances I am in.’

 

Many others experienced positive changes, even profound shifts in their lives:

 

·    I was offered jobs as a teacher in three schools.’

 

·    “I was able to make contact with my spirit guide.  . . . This has opened up not just new worlds, but the Universe and the power of thought as well as the invisible world.’

 

·   ‘I have forgiven my mother.’

 

·   ‘I felt my place was home and holistic counselling, and left my office job.’

 

·   ‘I applied to the Peace Corps.’

 

·   ‘I am setting up a team to develop a formula for peace based on my understanding of Sir Lanka.’

 

In future, a majority  (64 per cent) wanted to participate in quarterly Peace Intention Experiments but a third also wanted large-scale Intentions of the Week.  We have a new e-mail host, who is helping me build these.  Now that I’m no longer traveling so much, we’ll have these ready next week.

 

But we want to hear from the rest