Something in the water

Jul
15
2008
by
Lynne McTaggart
/
8
Comments

I’ve just heard back from Gary Schwartz about our latest Intention Experiment, which I am delighted to share with you.
After our successful Germination Intention Experiment, and the interesting results we got from our three Water Intention Experiments, Dr. Schwartz and I decided to merge the two by carrying out a Water Germination Experiment. We’d try another Germination Experiment, but this time we would send the ‘grow’ instructions to the water, not directly to the seeds themselves.
In late June I was due to speak at the Eric Pearl/Wrage event in Hamburg, which seemed a perfect venue to carry out a first pilot study, particularly as a large percentage of the audience would be Reconnection healers.  I showed the audience photos of four bottles, like the one in the photo, and asked them to choose one.  A member of the audience randomly selected bottle number 4, and I asked the audience to send the following intention to the water:
‘My intention is that all the seeds given water from our target jar will sprout at least three inches by the fourth day of growing.’
Dr. Schwartz and Mark Bocozzi, our wonderful lab technician in Dr. Schwartz’s Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health at the University of Arizona, then used each bottle to water a set of 30 seeds, like this.  Each set of seeds was assigned a particular jar of water.
The seeds were then soaked in the intended water (or control water) for 24 hours, rinsed in their respective water, and then planted within their water. The water was poured into an airtight bag, and the seeds placed within the soil within them, so they were imbued with the water’s energy for five days.
On the fifth day, Mark measured all five sets of seedlings, and Dr. Schwartz analyzed them.
When he looked at the average level of growth, the seeds watered with the ‘grow intention’ were slightly higher than the others, but the results were not  statistically significant, according to the scientific definition.. The average growth was 4.77 cm for the intended water (n=30 seeds) versus 4.66 for the non-intended water (n=90 seeds).  The difference is .11 cm or 1.1 millimeters.
The little seeds that grew
However, Dr. Schwartz noted one other interesting phenomenon.  In this experiment, ordinarily all of the seeds don’t sprout in any given group.  In this experiment of all the control groups, only had 90 per cent of seeds sprouted (that is, 9 of the 90 seeds in total didn’t sprout).  However, the full 100 per cent of the seeds, or all 30, sprouted in the group watered with the intended water.
In other words, intention may have given the seeds more energy and caused more of them to sprout than normal.
For all of you number crunchers, a chi square statistic on these numbers reached a p <.07, which is borderline significant (p <.05 is the cutoff for statistical significance).
‘This observation is encouraging, and deserves replication and extension,’ wrote Dr. Schwartz. ‘Since this is a "first ever" long distance (Germany to Tucson) group intention experiment on the effects of intention to water on the germination and growth of seeds, there is reason to do the experiment again.’
Master intenders
And the exciting news is that I’m going to try it again with a very special audience.  I am heading off to the Transformational Leadership Council meeting in a few days.  That group is composed of the leaders of the personal development movement, such as Jack Canfield, Steven Covey, Lynne Twist and many others.  It will be a powerhouse group of hugely experienced intenders.
Mark Boccozzi has also suggested slightly altering the experiment, using a “folded towel” method (this is a way to sprout seeds without soil). He suggests this method because it presents fewer potential confounding factors due to soil differences and allows us to use more seeds and larger groups.  We’re considering it and soon will be rolling out this experiment on the internet for all of you to participate.
In the meantime, please do sign up for our Peace Intention Experiment on September 14.

Lynne McTaggart

Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist and the author of seven books, including the worldwide international bestsellers The Power of Eight, The Field, The Intention Experiment and The Bond, all considered seminal books of the New Science and now translated into some 30 languages.

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8 comments on “Something in the water”

  1. I am very happy that, you are making this experiments. It make it so much easyer for me to explain my own work to others.
    I look forward to the next experiment.
    Love and ligth Torben

  2. Wonderful news and it validates what many of us already know regarding healing and structured water!

  3. Just another validation of how we humans truly are the caretakers of all that is around us on this physical plane and that we all are structured from the same conciousness that makes the heart beat and the stars and planets stay in orbit. Intention truly is where it is at to create anything and everything we wish to have.
    Love & Light
    Maria

  4. positive results - great. heres to many more. By the way, did you see the wall street journal article that said the no. 1 best seller in Iran is "The Secret"?

  5. thank you for the work you do. It keeps me on 'my toes' to keep imbuing intention into as many moments as possible of daily life as we go from one experiment to the next. It forsters the practice of vigilance/dedication/passion to live my life from that intentional space inside and shift my center of gravity closest to my values, so that they can be 'metabolized' and nourish the progress to intend in the deepest possible way. Participating in your experiments over time is like a spiritual or energy curriculum that I have designed in the manner of a rigourous awareness training that fosters a 'discipline' of the head and the heart and develops the capacity of keeping my reactions centered there.
    Yes, for me passion and discipline go together, not to let the momentum of the experiments dissipate. Which I could be good at!
    I had intended to find such a curriculum and practice training. Thank you with all my heart.

  6. How totally facinating the subject is - I look forward to the whole process of experiments as they take place and of being a small part of them!

  7. Full steam ahead. This brilliant endeavor holds the future prospects of salvaging our fragile environment.

Why wait any longer when you’ve already been waiting your entire life?

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