Thinking larger

No one doubts that we’re social creatures, designed to share food and shelter, but last week I came across some evidence in evolutionary theory suggesting that we’ve also been designed to share our thoughts. Michael Tomasello, co-director of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, has written The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition, a book with a fascinating theory: that people have the power not only to share attention but to understand and imitate and hold someone else’s intention.
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Back to the future

To eat or not to eat—that is the question. Or, to put it another way, what is the perfect diet for health, perfect weight and longevity? In the close to three decades since Bryan and I have been publishing WDDTY, we’ve seen (and, in many cases, seen off) the Cambridge Diet (a very low-calorie diet), the F-Plan Diet (F is for fibre), the Atkins Diet (one of the first low-carb diets), the Hip and Thigh Diet (more very low-cal), the Zone and Montignac (two variations on a low-carb theme), the 5:2 Diet (intermittent fasting, or eating less food two days
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Of dirty medicine and double-standards

Last night I went to a screening at London’s Curzon Soho of the film JUST ONE DROP (www.justonedropfilm.com), a great new film about homeopathy, which miraculously didn’t get banned or trolled. This professional, eight-year effort attempted to be quite even-handed, while featuring many compelling and documented success stories. There was a child with autism who began to speak, make eye contact and connect with his parents only once he’d been treated with homeopathy, with the before and after home videos to prove it.  There was a fellow whose MRSA was successfully overcome not by antibiotics but by homeopathy, and who
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A cleaner sweep

My magazine What Doctors Don’t Tell You owes its start to dental fillings—my dental fillings. I’d had bad teeth as a kid—the product of the average heavily processed, high-sugar, American diet—and by the time I was a teenager, there weren’t many of my teeth, other than the few at the front, that weren’t covered in metal. In my early 30s, I developed a load of unexplained, seemingly unrelated symptoms that worsened over the following months.
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The Miami Korotkov Water Experiment

Last Friday, I was in Florida, host to a miracle. During my keynote speech, I planned to do another water Intention Experiment. I’d set up an Intention Experiment with the Russian physicist Konstantin Korotkov, a professor at what is now called the Russian National University of Informational Technology, Mechanics and Optics. The plan was to see if my audience of 1000 at the World Happiness Summit in Miami could, in some way, affect a bottle of water sitting in his laboratory in St. Petersburg, Russia.
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What makes for true happiness

A survey just got published last week showing that the biggest regret expressed by an overwhelming majority of people on their deathbeds is that they didn’t live what they considered a life of purpose and meaning. Since I’m speaking at the World Happiness Summit today I thought I’d look at what a life of meaning actually means and what about it makes for true happiness.
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The worst of times, the best of times

Last week, I read an article by Timothy Egan in the New York Times International edition which convinced me that all the political upheaval presently in the Western world is an incredibly good thing. Egan headed off to a ‘Search for Meaning’ festival at Seattle University in Washington state, convinced that he’d be among a ragtag handful of overly earnest attendees. In fact, the event was sold out with standing room as people crammed on top of each other listen to keynotes on finding meaning in a time of change and disruption. ‘Face it,’ wrote Egan about America, ‘We have
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The miraculous rebound power of group intention

It started, by accident, with Don Berry. Don was a US Army veteran from Tullahoma, Tennessee, and he’d written into my Intention Experiment website forum in March 2007, offering to be our first human Intention Experiment. In 1981, Don had been diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis and his spine was fused, making it impossible for him to move from side to side. Even his ribs seemed frozen in place, making it difficult even to move his chest. Over the course of the years, he had had both hips replaced, and he was in constant pain. He had numerous x-rays and other
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Shooting the Messenger: the heroism of Andrew Wakefield

There he was on Valentine’s Day last week, Andrew Wakefield, appearing back in the UK for the first time in a decade, to present the European premiere of his movie VAXXED, which concerns all the statistical jiggery-pokery employed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the government body invested with protecting the nation against infectious diseases, to conceal any link between the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism. 
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Changing the world, one person at a time

Last week I participated in a panel in London, chaired by Daniel Pinchbeck, author of  Breaking Open the Head and other bestselling books, to launch his new book How Soon is Now? The panel focused on what failing systems in our society need to change (the economic model, globalization, energy, the media, you name it), and why we are in a unique moment in our modern history, with Donald Trump a kind of wrecking ball whose job essentially is to hurry the entire process along.
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