What you do with the most promising cancer treatment to date?

Feb
20
2015
by
Lynne McTaggart
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Question: what do you think the UK government would do when faced with a naturally occurring human protein that well could be a successful breakthrough treatment for cancer and save them billions of pounds on largely useless treatments like chemotherapy?

Answer: If you said ‘ban it, as unfit for humans’ you are correct, for that’s exactly what the British government has done with GcMAF, the ‘supermolecule’ being used to treat cancer and many other life-threatening diseases.

Question: what do you think the UK government would do when faced with a naturally occurring human protein that well could be a successful breakthrough treatment for cancer and save them billions of pounds on largely useless treatments like chemotherapy?

Answer: If you said ‘ban it, as unfit for humans’ you are correct, for that’s exactly what the British government has done with GcMAF, the ‘supermolecule’ being used to treat cancer and many other life-threatening diseases.

On 4 February, the UK’s Medicine and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) staged a raid on the manufacturing plant of Immuno Biotech, in Milton, Cambridgeshire and made off with 10,000 vials of the stuff, claiming the manufacturing process had been ‘contaminated.’

ImmunoBiotech has its offices in Guernsey, and after pressure from the MHRA, Guernsey has now banned importation or exportation of GcMAF, leaving many patients with cancer and other illnesses stranded without recourse to a treatment they say was saving their lives.

GcMAF is the discovery of an Italian molecular biologist named Marco Ruggiero, who worked at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), in Bethesda, Maryland.

Ruggiero was researching signal transduction, or how cancer cells stealthily sabotage signals coming from elsewhere in the body, when he and his colleagues began to recognize the vital role of an unlikely protein, which was ultimately christened ‘Gc-protein-derived macrophage activating factor’, or ‘GcMAF’(pronounced ‘Gee-cee-maf’) for short.

It’s been known for a century that macrophages are the body’s primary ‘foot soldiers’ against pathogens like bacteria and viruses, and also cancer. Although cancer cells are being produced in our bodies every day, often as a result of exposure to environmental toxins, ‘phages’ carry out search-and-destroy missions, sweeping through the body and engulfing (or ‘phagocytizing’, in science speak) cancerous mutations, cells infected by pathogens and the corpses of dead cells.

Ruggiero began studying the effects of using GcMAF against breast cancer cell lines in the laboratory. He was thunderstruck to discover that GcMAF not only stopped the cancer from spreading, but also caused cancerous cells to transform into healthy cells.

As part of its ‘clean-up’ act on breast cancer, it nullified the potentially carcinogenic effects of heavy metals in cells and stimulated the body’s own natural detoxification system. It also appeared to increase energy production in mitochondria and improve the metabolic activity and connectivity of neurons in the brain.

When combined with certain probiotics and the fatty acids in cow’s milk, the molecules could also completely reboot a damaged human ‘microbiome’, the good-guy microorganisms inhabiting the gut.

Besides cancer, GcMAF is being used against a vast number of illnesses; parents of children with autism given GcMAF are claiming extraordinary effects.

I interviewed four patients, one mother of a child with autism, and three cancer patients (two of whom had been end-stage patients) whose illnesses had been completely turned around with GcMAF.

Behind the ban, of course, is the heavy hand of Big Business and the pharmaceutical industry. Pro-Big Pharma interests intensely lobbied Guernsey’s medicines’ regulator before the raid. Last July, Natwest ImmunoBiotech’s account because, as Commerce Minister Kevin Stewart said, GcMF was ‘unproven and unlicensed’.

Despite the fact that ImmunoBiotech CEO David Noakes has not sold the product, but has given it away to 100 patients, they can no long even import GcMAF from anywhere, even though, as Ed Freestone, Guernsey’s chief pharmacist admits, ‘There is no current information suggesting the product has caused direct harm to anyone’s health.’ This is also despite the fact that Ruggiero and numerous colleagues around the world have published many scientific papers in reputable medical journals about GcMAF.

Patricia Bougourd, 71, who has asbestosis, claims her symptoms improved dramatically through use of the product. She now has just one day’s supply left.

The residents of Guernsey are not taking this lying down. They have taken out an ad in the local Guernsey paper on behalf of the 100 Guernsey patients pleading that they be allowed to continue to take this supplement. On February 7, the patients met at the St Pierre Park Hotel to figure out the next steps, and their plan is a legal challenge. Robin Bougourd, 68, for one is exploring a human rights claim to overturn the import ban.

Lord Saatchi’s Medical Innovations Bill now before Parliament is designed to give doctors more freedom to use innovative cancer treatments, and there is a good likelihood it will pass.

It is time to put innovative cancer treatment on the political agenda throughout the West and to let the politicians know we are no longer willing to allow business interests to continue to impede any possibility of finding a cure for cancer. Like the Guernsey patients, someday your life may depend on it.

 

Lynne McTaggart

Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist and the author of seven books, including the worldwide international bestsellers The Power of Eight, The Field, The Intention Experiment and The Bond, all considered seminal books of the New Science and now translated into some 30 languages.

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