What The Times Didn't Tell You

Oct
3
2013
by
Lynne McTaggart
/
0
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The Times made a number of accusations in its article published on Tues, October 1, claiming that lots of experts, doctors and patients were seeking to have us banned from the shelves. Here is what they say, and here is what we actually published.

The Times made a number of accusations in its article published on Tues, October 1, claiming that lots of experts, doctors and patients were seeking to have us banned from the shelves. Here is what they say, and here is what we actually published.

The Times stated: we said vitamin C cures HIV.

We had written: “US internist Robert Cathcart…devised an experiment with around 250 inpatients who tested positive for HIV. In a letter to the editor of The Lancet, he wrote that his regime of giving oral doses of vitamin C close to “bowel tolerance” had “slowed, stopped or sometimes reversed for several years” the depletion of an HIV patient’s CD4+ cells.

The Times says we tell people not to immunise their children.

We interviewed – and simply quoted – a medical doctor called Dr Jayne Donegan, who had done her own research into the MMR, and concluded that a child with a strong immune system shouldn’t have the vaccine. This was the considered view of Dr Donegan, not us. We were simply quoting her.

The Times says we said that 100 girls had died after being given the HPV vaccine.

We had said that, up to 2011, the American Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System had received notification of 68 deaths and 18,727 adverse reactions to the vaccine. The figure has now risen to 27.023 events.

The Times said we referred to a study in India in which girls had died following the vaccine but had not mentioned that one girl had drowned and one died from a snake bite.

We said that following administration of the HPV vaccine, seven children died and 120 suffered debilitating side effects so bad that the trial was stopped following protests from parents, doctors, public health organizations and health networks. The Times also omitted to mention that, in 2010, an official Indian government report discovered huge lapses in the study’s design, which resulted in gross under-reporting of serious side effects.

The Times said that we ‘suggest homeopathy could cure cancer’.

We're not sure how they have divined what we're going to write as we have not published the story yet – we haven’t even finished writing it. Here's what we wrote in our ‘Coming Next Month’ column in our November 2013 issue about homeopathy and cancer in its entirety:

‘The US government has carried out impressive studies into homeopathy as a treatment for cancer, and a clinic is India is actually using it. We report on their findings about homeopathy as a cancer treatment.’

 

Lynne McTaggart

Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist and the author of seven books, including the worldwide international bestsellers The Power of Eight, The Field, The Intention Experiment and The Bond, all considered seminal books of the New Science and now translated into some 30 languages.

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