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The secret life of pain

On May 11th, 2018

We all know what causes physical pain, don’t we? A part of your body gets crunched, cracked, stabbed, cut or burned, and you feel pain. Or, pain starts up when some body part gives way, like an overworked knee, or wears away, like cartilage, so that the parts no longer mesh together with ease.

In other words, pain is, essentially, some sort of mechanical issue, a faulty piece of equipment, caused by your body wearing out or getting broken. Or even, in the case of auto-immunity, that catch-all phrase medicine uses when it doesn’t really know the cause, when our body decides, for some unknown reason, to start breaking itself.

More than mechanical

New evidence on pain puts paid to those simplistic ideas. Many cases of back pain have nothing to do with wear and tear but are caused by infections: by bacteria—particularly the very species that causes simple common acne—as well as by fungi and other sorts of gut bugs. These bugs invade the tissues and begin causing all manner of pain.

Besides back pain, bugs like these can also cause the most intractable cases of arthritis. When a fellow called Sean was diagnosed with ankylosing spondylitis in his 20s he was told that he would be in a wheelchair by 30. Eventually, he discovered that bugs were the cause of his arthritic inflammation, too.

Besides infections, much other pain is caused by simple stress. Drs David Wise and Rodney Anderson, who specialize in resolving pelvic pain, claim that it results from a mental/emotional cause: “The major contributing factor,” they write in an excerpt from their book A Headache in the Pelvis (Hay House, 2018), "involves a chronically knotted up, contracted pelvis—typically a physical response to years of worry—that leads to tight, irritated pelvic floor tissue."

Emotional causes

Besides stress, this can be caused by some sort of emotional or mental trauma, or even by a series of stresses, causing the sufferer’s muscles to be permanently on-guard. Recently, one of my employees met someone at a pain clinic whose pelvic pain started the moment his girlfriend was diagnosed with cancer.

And we know there is something else going on here when we can think ourselves out of pain—or even, as recent evidence suggests, that pain can be lowered just from holding someone else’s hand.

A friend of mine used to suffer from back pain so severe that in her lowest moments, she even contemplated suicide. One day, her brother, a pain expert, told her that her pain was a mental feedback loop and she should try one simple trick. Every time she had pain, she should name it— ‘squeaky,’ ‘twitchy,’ whatever—and then forget about it and place her attention elsewhere. She tried it for a few days—and never had a painful back again.

If bugs, stress or emotional grief are the cause of pain, the solution is very different from the mechanistically based treatments offered by modern medicine. It requires a good deal of detective work to find practitioners who understand these root causes and have developed reliable cures.

Keep looking for the solution

In the case of Sean, the answer was simple—a change of diet—but the path to finding that solution required years of digging and searching, and never giving up.

For that’s the real nub of the issue. Since so little is really known about the source of much illness, and particularly pain, you need to take on board a certain attitude when you’ve got a condition like this: that you’re going to find a solution, no matter what it takes.

For that’s the worst part of pain, say Drs Wise and Anderson. It isn’t the pain itself. All of us can take all manner of suffering—just consider women in childbirth. The problem begins when you get into the mindset that things will never get any better, that you are going to have to live with this pain forever.

If a doctor ever tells you that, run as fast as you can out the door and find another practitioner. In almost every instance, there’s a way to get better. That doctor just doesn’t know what it is, and you just haven’t found it yet.

Comments

comments

4 responses to “The secret life of pain”

  1. Thanks, Lynne, for a more expansive perspective!

    For myself, I have found that TAT(R), a somewhat meditative form of energy psychology, helps release the limiting beliefs that can contribute to a condition continuing long past an initial precipitating experience.

    Then I have a powerful conversation with my body:
    -I thank my body for all it has done for me, whether I recognized it or not. And I tell it that it is loved just as it is Now and Every Now.
    -I update my body on my new condition and choice for vitality, ease, strength, well-being (whatever seems best).
    -I tell my body (or that specific part or system) that it has a Divine blueprint (a template given to us from birth) and invite my body to find its Divine blueprint. (I then wait a few seconds or a minute, until I feel or believe that the connection has occurred.)
    -Then I invite that part of my body to "sync up with its Divine blueprint, like I sync my phone with my computer".

    Magic, miracles, the simplicity of clear communication gratitude and respect... whatever it is, this 2-pronged process has led to several personal miraculous experiences!...
    -All peripheral vision restored after 2 docs diagnosed me with Glaucoma (vision still 100% since 1/27/2012).
    -Stretched ligaments related to a car accident (leading to joint going out and me crumpling to the floor several times a month) restored to normal functioning in 20 minutes. Has not happened again in 2-3 years now.
    -and more!

    Oh, and whether I'm doing the process with a group or by myself, I expand to the Power of Eight, asking my spiritual helpers to be with me in the process. (When 2 or more are gathered...)

    Your insights and actions are a blessing, Lynn. Thank you!

    Jeanine DuBois

    • Debra says:

      Hi Jeanine. I also practice TAT (12 yrs) and have had wonderful success with traumatic events. I will now incorporate your "2nd prong". Thank you for sharing.

  2. I am so glad to see this information about pain and the issue of doing your own research. I have post-polio syndrome and had extreme pain from this condition. I have always been a "mind-body" - look for the emotional cause first person. However, my life changed by being introduced to Dr. John Sarno's ground-breaking book: Healing Back Pain, and his follow-up books, The Mind-Body Prescription and the Divided Mind. He so beautifully describes how all life factors can impinge on how our body reacts, and the remedy is so simple. I did not have back pain (mine was legs,arms, etc...)however, the remedy is the same, and it is 'how we think, our unconscious feelings, underlie most physical problems. I personally called him to explain how successful his analysis of the cause of pain was for me, and he was surprised that it worked on the issue of post polio. His next book included a comment on polio. Thank you, Lynn, for continuing to expose us to new and exciting information !

    Audrey

  3. Lisa says:

    My chiropractor found the answer to my back pain and hip flexor in my stomach meridian. As soon as he strengthened it. I was able to get up and walk without pain. This had been plaguing me on and off for over 10 years. Tried tens, exercise, sleeping on the floor. I cant take medication so everything was done naturally. This is what released it. As long as I use digestives and be aware of what I eat. No more pain. I have been pain free for over 4 years now.

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