Better than we were

Dec
12
2013
by
Lynne McTaggart
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I’ve just returned home from Kuala Lumpur, where I was a speaker at the Leadership Energy Summit Asia organized by a Malaysian organization called the ICLIF Leadership and Governance Centre (http://www.iclif.org).

 

ICLIF was originally set up by Malaysian central bank governor Dr Zeti Akhtar Aziz. After the disastrous banking crisis in Malaysia in 1998 (a crisis akin to our Western financial meltdown of 2008), she wanted to ensure that leaders in finance and corporations be more responsible — and essentially more moral.  

 

I’ve just returned home from Kuala Lumpur, where I was a speaker at the Leadership Energy Summit Asia organized by a Malaysian organization called the ICLIF Leadership and Governance Centre (http://www.iclif.org).

 

ICLIF was originally set up by Malaysian central bank governor Dr Zeti Akhtar Aziz. After the disastrous banking crisis in Malaysia in 1998 (a crisis akin to our Western financial meltdown of 2008), she wanted to ensure that leaders in finance and corporations be more responsible — and essentially more moral.  

 

The focus of the conference was what makes for a great leader  — specifically, what are the personal sources of energy and staying power that great leaders tap into at will, particularly when times get tough?

 

For the first time in Asia, this topic was to be analyzed and explored through the lens of neuroscience, management psychology and spiritual philosophy, and the audience ready to hear this was composed of more than 400 financial leaders in Malaysia, including several heads of banks.

 

To address this topic ICIF assembled an incredible collection of extraordinary speakers: Robert Swan, OBE, the first person to walk to both the North and South Poles, and now a major environmental activist; Dr. Patch Adams, the doctor turned clown, who speaks around the world about reforming health care; Dr. Kiran Bedi, the first woman police officer and prison warden in India who, against the resistance of her male colleagues, created major prison reform in India and exposed corruption in the police force (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OdteZIdoF4A).

 

The two-day event also featured Ping Fu, who’d been forcibly separated from her adoptive parents at 10, and survived rape and  imprisonment for being politically outspoken, emigrated to America,  co-founded  Geomagic, a 3-D printing and imaging software development company, in 1997.  Eight years later, she was named Inc. magazine’s Entrepreneur of the Year.

 

Dr. Zeti Akhtar Aziz herself spoke.  As first female governor of Malaysia's Central Bank, she has repeatedly stood up to all the Western (largely male) bullies in the IMF and the heads of Western government such as Britain’s former prime minister Gordon Brown by implementing controls against speculators and firing the whole of the banking senior management who'd caused the 1998 banking crisis. 

 

 My own talk was to provide a new overview of the science, demonstrating that the Darwinian 'greed is good' model is not supported by cutting edge science and that the West's financial model is a busted flush because it acts against nature.  IONS chief scientist Dean Radin and GDV inventor physicist Konstantin Korotkov followed on with a wonderful round-up of the unassailable scientific evidence of our connectedness.

 

I was humbled by the extraordinary message of all the speakers over the two days and also by the willingness of the audience to take on board what we had to say.

 

 Over lunch, my husband Bryan and I also had the opportunity to speak with Dr. Aziz about her refreshingly moral views about banking.  Possibly alone among bank chiefs, she’d refused to allow the banks to be bailed out by the Malaysian people or indulge in ‘quantitative easing’ as a quick-fix measure. She also didn’t hesitate in punishing those that had caused the crisis, rather than rewarding them with enormous bonuses, as our Western leaders have done.

 

When speaking to them, my message was simple:  don’t do as we did.  Throughout the two days I kept repeating in my mind a line from the Arthur Miller play All My Sons, when the mother of the family attempts to justify her husband’s wrongdoing (sending out faulty airplane parts during WWII, causing the death of many innocent young men) by arguing that her husband did it only in order to protect his own family. ‘What more can we be?’ she says to Chris.

 

‘You can be better!’ he replies. ‘Once and for all you can know there's a universe of people outside and you're responsible to it.’

 

 

I hope that in some small way our audience understood that it’s their turn and the turn of all emerging nations in the East right now to grow and develop, but to do it better than we did. 

 

 

Lynne McTaggart

Lynne McTaggart is an award-winning journalist and the author of seven books, including the worldwide international bestsellers The Power of Eight, The Field, The Intention Experiment and The Bond, all considered seminal books of the New Science and now translated into some 30 languages.

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