When Pro-Life and Pro-Choice became good buddies

Imagine the following happening in America today: a group of women meeting regularly, half of the group pro-life and Trump supporters, and the other half pro-choice and Clinton supporters, each group respecting the other’s point of view and speaking together with compassion and understanding. Impossible? That’s exactly what happened nearly 26 years ago.
Read More

Brexit and the US election: understanding the ‘other’

As I witness the great divisions in both Britain and America in the recent referendum and ongoing US election campaign, I’m reminded of Mark Gerzon, who, as a leadership facilitator with the Congress and the United Nations, once worked with the New Israel Fund, an organization whose membership, comprised of both Israelis and Palestinians, raises money for a number of joint causes.   When he asked the board how they were able to work together so effectively, one board member replied, “We are able to live with paradoxes.”
Read More

Quantum plants

Inside the interior of a football-sized laboratory at the University of California at Berkeley, Graham Fleming and his colleagues in the biology department have set up the scientific equivalent of a pinball machine. Numerous precision lasers, which pulse out light at millions of a billionth of a second, are placed in various strategic points, trained onto an obstacle course of mirrors and glass lenses, themselves aimed at a tiny solitary black box. Once the lasers are switched on, the light generated by these ultra-fast light beams will careen off each mirror and lens before shooting inside and alighting on the
Read More

A tale of two campaigns

This blog is NOT about who should become the next President of the United States. It’s a tale of two campaigns, about the way in which we Americans have elected to choose our leaders, compared to the way in which Great Britain chooses theirs.
Read More

The audacity of hope

This is a story about a largely unsung hero who changed the face of medicine from a tiny village in the English East Midlands. For us, the story began in 1995 when Bryan’s 78-year-old mother Edie was diagnosed with end-stage breast cancer. Privately her doctor told us, “If I were you, I’d get her affairs in order.” When he’d examined her, he’d been shocked: her breast, he told me, looked like raw meat. In fact, so advanced was the cancer, he said, that it was too late to try chemotherapy or any other intervention. She had three months to live,
Read More

Even better vibrations

Even better vibrations For all aspects of life, molecules have to speak to each other. If you’re excited, your adrenals pump out more adrenaline, which tells specific receptors to get your heart beating faster. The standard theory about how this happens is that two molecules that match each other structurally exchange specific (chemical) information, which happens when they bump into each other, a bit like a key finding its own keyhole. But if these occurrences are due to chance, then there’s very little statistical hope of their taking place, considering the universe of the cell. Tennis balls in swimming pools
Read More

The big wheeze

We are overwhelmed by wheezing these days. Some 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, and one of every 10 Americans will suffer from the condition at some point in their lives. As to the cause of this soaring epidemic, conventional medicine is unequivocal, pointing the finger squarely at pollen and other airborne irritants like animal dander and dust mites. But what most doctors don’t appreciate is that up to 50 per cent of asthma is caused by a food allergy.
Read More

The big wheeze

We are overwhelmed by wheezing these days. Some 300 million people worldwide suffer from asthma, and one of every 10 Americans will suffer from the condition at some point in their lives.   As to the cause of this soaring epidemic, conventional medicine is unequivocal, pointing the finger squarely at pollen and other airborne irritants like animal dander and dust mites.   But what most doctors don’t appreciate is that up to 50 per cent of asthma is caused by a food allergy.  
Read More

Playing Cowboys and Indians

Last week David Brooks wrote a column in the International New York Times with the extraordinary assertion that in 18th century America, when the Native Americans and the European settlers lived cheek by jowl, not a single Indian defected to go live with the settlers, but many settlers took off to live with the Native Americans. At the time, the colonial settlers had embraced what we regard as the ‘good’ and ‘civilized life’: rich, ‘advanced’, with single-family dwellings and a good deal of privacy. The natives, however, had a lifestyle we might consider primitive because it was communal and tribal,
Read More

How to really say you’re sorry

Not long ago, I attended a talk featuring a man who’d accidentally killed several people in a car accident through negligent driving – a case not unlike that of Oscar Pistorius, the Paralympic champion convicted of accidently murdering his girlfriend. (I’m changing some of the particulars but staying with the real meaning of what happened there.) The man – we’ll call him John Smith – was tried, convicted of negligent homicide and served his prison term, during which time he lost everything: his business, his house and all his savings. After he came on he began addressing his downfall as
Read More